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Old 23-01-2010, 12:04   #61
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I want one!
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Old 23-01-2010, 23:45   #62
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I want one!
Just found out it (the 545) wont do zig-zag.

Someone recommended the Pfaff 130.
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Old 24-01-2010, 02:29   #63
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We have been offered a Singer 237.

Anyone used one or know if it would do the job ?
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Old 24-01-2010, 09:54   #64
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How much would it be to rebuild or at least adjust a Pfaff 130?
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Old 24-01-2010, 10:40   #65
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How much would it be to rebuild or at least adjust a Pfaff 130?
Hopefully this post won't be taken by the mods as an advertisement.

I charge $75 for a 30 point tuneup on a mechanical machine which includes sewing samples of the completed job.

Ribbony,
I don't understand the reason for the near cult like following for the Pfaff 130. It's an OK mechanical machine, but so are a lot of other mechanical machines of the same era.

A Singer 237 is no more or less powerful than most machines of the same age. It's a decent HOME type machine.

All of the machines being discussed here will do a similar job on a boat, but are NOT powerful enough to sew all the way into the corners of a big jib or mainsail without some "stitch at a time" help from you and the handwheel and maybe not even then.
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Old 24-01-2010, 11:01   #66
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What about this one? says 1/4" zig zag max. No walking foot. But then the 130 doesnt either.

Pfaff 138 zig zag sewing machine. Mainly used for making sailcloth, applique banners, repairs,canvas works, quilt.This is not walking foot machine widest zig zag 1/4"

Good condition , run good , clean , and been in service.
table including

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Old 24-01-2010, 11:29   #67
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I was looking at the singer 201. what about that machine. it seems very well regarded and the example stitches look like if it can sew through tons of leather and stuff it's be able to sew some sails.. My sewing experience is limited to repairing seams in pants and hemming jeans.. is the 201 a better performer than the sears models or the pfaff models?
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Old 24-01-2010, 11:33   #68
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The Pfaff is a great machine except, that motor under the bottom side is a cluch motor, I know as Ive got one.. the survo motor as in the second picture has more control BUT.. this system will NOT go on a boat for portable use..
If you could work out the issue of the motor, and the table, another issue is the OIL PAN as most industrial machines worth a darn have a self oiling system..
You can see mine has a 1 quart oil pan and an oiling system..
Oiling isnt the problem as a remote container is possible but the system drips into the pan like a car motor...
we're trying to figure out a recovery system to take ours aboard.. the motor is simple as we're going to a AC to DC motor..
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Old 24-01-2010, 11:36   #69
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I take back that "worth a darn" comment as there are a good amount of great portable machines out there but most all the industrial machines have gone to an oil pan oiling system..
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Old 24-01-2010, 14:22   #70
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What about this one? says 1/4" zig zag max. No walking foot. But then the 130 doesnt either.

Pfaff 138 zig zag sewing machine. Mainly used for making sailcloth, applique banners, repairs,canvas works, quilt.This is not walking foot machine widest zig zag 1/4"
That would be great for sails, but you'll need a big boat to carry such a machine. The motor is mounted under the table.

Regarding the oil system on industrials, how about a dry sump system?
Porsche 911's use 2 pumps, the one in the sump pumps faster than the pressure pump, thus scavenging all oil to a holding tank.
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Old 24-01-2010, 20:50   #71
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Just bought it. I may have to buy a portable eventually, but with this I can make new cusion covers, sail covers, and try my hand at sail making/repair. It seems like a nice machine.
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Old 24-01-2010, 22:38   #72
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Ok,everything ive read on here says that i need an older machine with metal gears but is this really necessary? I just watched a demo of a new pfaff hobby 1122 machine at a local sewing store which was sewing through 16 layers of denim (i didnt count them)without much problem,which is more than im likely to sew, the machine is only $259 and comes with a 10yr warranty so it seems that if i did strip the gears they would be replaced under warranty,this was the cheapest machine they carry and they claim very few problems. When i made the point about the preference for metal gears the sales lady made a compelling argument for plastic gears which i could not argue with, i have experience with designing and building machinery and while the term plastic gears sounds low quality,the truth is if they are accuratly machined from the appropriate engineered plastic they have very good strength and are self lubricating. Now im not claiming that they are as good in this application because i simply have no experience at all with sewing machines, im just wondering if just maybe i may be better off buying this very reasonably priced new machine from a well respected marque rather than an older machine which could very easily end up costing more.
If i were to be honest with myself i will most likely only be using the machine to make up the usual things like handrail covers,tiller,hatch covers etc as well as hemming some pants etc,i dont really expect to be doing much sail repair but i do want the ability to do so,maybe i will try making a dinghy sail for the tender but nothing big,so im not sure how heavy duty i need.
Steve.
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Old 25-01-2010, 01:57   #73
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That's an interesting machine, and available in Oz. Would love to hear how it sews.
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Old 25-01-2010, 04:35   #74
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I have the Pfaff 130, and it does a fair job on canvas and the edges of sails, like replacing the sun cover on roller furling jibs, but it does need manual help at the corners where there are more than 3 layers of cloth, and I would hate to try to roll up a big genoa and stuff it through that small throat if I was resewing a middle seam.

What I would like is a motor/controller for it which controls speed, rather than power--so I don't have to use one hand to get the machine started and/or deal with it racing away once it gets going. Is there something modern which can be retrofitted?
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Old 25-01-2010, 10:50   #75
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Quote:
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When i made the point about the preference for metal gears the sales lady made a compelling argument for plastic gears which i could not argue with, i have experience with designing and building machinery and while the term plastic gears sounds low quality,the truth is if they are accuratly machined from the appropriate engineered plastic they have very good strength and are self lubricating.
Steve.
The thread started with a question about used machines. Old machines with plastic gears are generally a waste of time if you're going to do heavy work, as the gears will strip. The plastics of the day weren't as good as today's.

I can't speak for that machine personally, but if you decide to buy it, the plastic will probably last longer than the gears of yesteryear.

[QUOTE/] What I would like is a motor/controller for it which controls speed, rather than power--so I don't have to use one hand to get the machine started and/or deal with it racing away once it gets going. Is there something modern which can be retrofitted? [QUOTE]

An electronic foot control will give you much better motor torque at low speed than the original resistive control.
Ask a sewing machine tech for an old control WITH the ability to directly power the motor. Some are simply the resistor to tell the rest of the electronics what to do.
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