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Old 16-02-2011, 18:40   #16
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Originally Posted by skipmac View Post

4. Short handed I think the ease of furling/reefing the jib outweighs the potential concerns for jamming or other breakage. If I planned any high latitude or other high risk sailing I might rethink.

One question, if you have a roller furler but plan to have hank on as a backup, do you have hanks or at least the eyes for the installation already sewn into your jibs?
Re your pt 4:

a) I think the risk of jamming / breakage is small - we have the cheapest (Plastimo) unit that came with the boat, and we have had this one for 8 years now (I have just replaced the bearings this year), I believe things like Harken or Facnor must be nearly bullet-proof then,

b) I would never use hanks in high latitude - all IMOCA boats furl, and you do not want crew on rolling foredeck, in cold water / weather ...

Re the question - we do not use the same sails for furlers and for hanks - we carry separate sets (jib and storm jib with hanks, big jib and a spare for the furler, the sails with hanks are the shorter ones so they can be used on any stay).

The funny: our storm jib is built the way that we can convert it to an emergency "main" too (remove the hanks, insert the slides ...). Never used this way, but can be done.

b.
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Old 16-02-2011, 21:29   #17
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Re your pt 4:

a) I think the risk of jamming / breakage is small - we have the cheapest (Plastimo) unit that came with the boat, and we have had this one for 8 years now (I have just replaced the bearings this year), I believe things like Harken or Facnor must be nearly bullet-proof then,
Well yes I pretty much agree and that is why I finally decided to go roller. BUT, it does happen, happened to me once years ago and if it does happen in really nasty weather it could sorta ruin your day.

BUT the likelyhood is really small, but if it does then....

Wait, here I go overthinking the whole deal again.

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b) I would never use hanks in high latitude - all IMOCA boats furl, and you do not want crew on rolling foredeck, in cold water / weather ...
No, don't want to go forward in cold weather but still, sailing in places where you can pretty much expect an occasional really hard blow I get back to the question, which system offers the absolute lowest chance of failure. So which is worse, getting cold and wet changing sails with the increase risks of going to the bow in bad weather or having a sail jam in the roller and whatever that might bring, including losing the rig?

IMOCA boats use rollers. Now I didn't know that (had to google IMOCA to find out that's the racing class for those go fast 60 footers, don't keep up with all the racy acronyms these days) but on the other hand, some of the racing types do stuff that I wouldn't as a cruiser.


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Re the question - we do not use the same sails for furlers and for hanks - we carry separate sets (jib and storm jib with hanks, big jib and a spare for the furler, the sails with hanks are the shorter ones so they can be used on any stay).

The funny: our storm jib is built the way that we can convert it to an emergency "main" too (remove the hanks, insert the slides ...). Never used this way, but can be done.

b.
Problem for me, not a lot of space to haul around that many sails which makes the idea of storm jib/main interesting. Might not set as well as dedicated sails but then in a storm that's usually the least of your concerns.

This does bring to mind one of my pet peaves. Ever notice that almost no production boats (at least in the under 50-60' range) have a place to stow the sails? How many boats have you seen that turn the forepeak into the sail locker, then have to throw the sails around to get into bed?
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Old 17-02-2011, 09:10   #18
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You could have the furler (135%-150%) genoa and have a storm gib on a detachable (highfield lever or similar) Solent stay. Is there not some storage underneath the v berth?
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Old 17-02-2011, 12:03   #19
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You could have the furler (135%-150%) genoa and have a storm gib on a detachable (highfield lever or similar) Solent stay. Is there not some storage underneath the v berth?
Yes there is a little storage under the V-berths which is where the spare sails will probably go. Plan is like you suggest, to go with a 135% on the furler. Aside from what will stay on the rig (main, staysail and the 135) I already have a high cut Yankee and an asym drifter/reacher. Will add a storm jib and storm main and maybe a second genoa for a downwind twizzle type rig. That will fill and probably overflow the space I have.

Main problem with stowing sails under the V-berth is you really can't stow wet sails there without problems with mildew and getting the whole area wet. Pluse it is a bit awkward moving all the cushions and such around to get to the storage.
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Old 17-02-2011, 13:01   #20
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Thats a lot of inventory allright. If they are wet leave them bagged on deck till you can dry maybe. I assume cockpit lockers are full to bursting also. You allready have a good sized boat but you will have to tell wife you need to go bigger.
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Old 17-02-2011, 17:11   #21
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I assume cockpit lockers are full to bursting also. .
What cockpit lockers? Ain't got no stinkin' cockpit lockers.

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You allready have a good sized boat but you will have to tell wife you need to go bigger.
Well, since it took me 30 years to talk my wife into getting another sailboat I think I better let well enough alone.
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Old 17-02-2011, 17:24   #22
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im wondering how i would be able to know if the stock standing rigging on a mid 80's catalina would be up to the task of blue water sailing. if not where can i get stronger rigging? what are the costs?
I'd say look at what others have actually done on a Catalina. Specifically, I'd say Patrick Childress. In other words, just rigging may not be enough.

If you're willing to read through a post from another thread, this post highlights Patrick Childress's upgrades in preparation for circumnavigation. I would just copy it in here but I did a lot of links you might also find interesting.
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Old 17-02-2011, 17:25   #23
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What cockpit lockers? Ain't got no stinkin' cockpit lockers.

We can fit all of our sails into the cockpit lockers......along with all the cockpit cushions
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Old 17-02-2011, 17:28   #24
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We can fit all of our sails into the cockpit lockers......along with all the cockpit cushions
Can anyone tell me where to find the smiley face with the tongue sticking out. Failing that, maybe one that is green for cockpit envy.
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Old 18-02-2011, 15:58   #25
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This does bring to mind one of my pet peaves. Ever notice that almost no production boats (at least in the under 50-60' range) have a place to stow the sails? How many boats have you seen that turn the forepeak into the sail locker, then have to throw the sails around to get into bed?
Big boats store the sails on the rollers / inside of the mast (furled). The real big boats will in fact furl things like gennaker and later store the furled sausage on a drum, under the deck (call it - twice furled ;-).

They do not seem to be bothered by 'jamming' or other 'what if issues' even thought the furlers are electric or hydraulic, etc..

Re possible failure - simply rig another forestay (preferably an outer one) and you have both extra security and a back up to hoist your jibs.

b.
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