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Old 15-07-2008, 10:17   #1
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Rigging Genoa to CDI Roller Furling

My new sailboat has a genoa on a CDI Furling system. I've never rigged a furling. Can anyone explaint what I attach, when, how, where, which lines I pull, etc.?

Sorry for such an elemntary question...
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Old 15-07-2008, 12:55   #2
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CDI is a simple system.....

You can find an instruction manual on line here.

CDI - Flexible Furlers

They are simple and very tough. If your sail wasn't made for a CDI you will have to have a luff tape attached. Read the manual and if you still are having trouble give me an email and I'll give you my phone number.........martin
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Old 15-07-2008, 12:58   #3
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Thanks Martin.
BTW, I'm new to sailing and amazed at how other sailors are soo ready and willing to help others.
Thanks again.
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Old 15-07-2008, 23:37   #4
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You are gonna luuuuuve that furler...

Is the sail installed?

The gennie sheets are usually still rigged through the leadblocks to the winches
There will be a line coming out of the furling drum aft that shold be cleated somewhere
Get the main up, turn to a reach, uncleat the furling line and the windward sheet, haul the lewerd sheet.
The gennie should come rolling out after which you can sheet it in.

To stow it release pressure on the leward sheet not quite until it luffs
Haul the furling line and it should roll up as you pay off the sheet.

Take one extra wrap around the forestay - you don't want the gennie out at all
Cleat the sheets and the furling line.

A guy here left a triangle of gennie out and did not cleat the furling line. A thunderstom came while it was moored during the week. The gennie came out and flogged itself to death. Expensive lesson...
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Old 16-07-2008, 10:59   #5
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Thanks for all the help! There might be a few other issues but I think I can work through it. From what I am gathering then, I attach the head of the sail to the furling halyard, thread the edge of the sail into the 'slot', hoist the halyard all the way, then attach the bottom of the genoa to the can, then the halyard (which is now longer since I hoisted the genoa) to the bottom of the can as well. Then I pull the furling sheet (which is now running afta nd cleated) to roll the sail. Am I right?

I have a slight problem in that the boatyard worker cut a piece of the genoa halyard when they were stepping the mast (long story) and now I don't think that when the genoa is fully hoisted, I will have enough line to reach and tie to the bottom of the furling can. Since I don't know how to splice, I will tie an extra 'extension' piece onto the halyard to make sure I have enough line to tie to the bottom of t he can.

I know... I am a total hack... but I'm new to all this, trying to learn and having to trouble shoot along the way (with no funds to pay for professional help!)
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Old 16-07-2008, 13:33   #6
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I have the CDI. It's pretty straight forward. After you do it once, you won't have any problems. Just make sure the furling line has enough wraps around the drum when you bend on your sail. I only did that once.
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Old 16-07-2008, 13:59   #7
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Quote:
Since I don't know how to splice, I will tie an extra 'extension' piece onto the halyard to make sure I have enough line to tie to the bottom of t he can.
You really don't want to do that. A splice is only slightly better and may be a problem down the road. A continuos line is really what you want. Try to see if it is long enough. This is not something you want to have break while sailing.

As Maddog says once hoisted you can find a clam day and pull it out and make sure it rolls back up. You might want a few wraps of furling line on the drum before you hoist it. When you roll it up you will then have enough on the drum to add a few warps of the jib sheets. This will make sure it does not open on it's own after you secure the other end of the furling line in the cockpit. Wind and sails and all that stuff.

As he says once you do it once you'll just understand because you'll see it.
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Old 16-07-2008, 18:28   #8
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Originally Posted by Adcurium View Post
From what I am gathering then, I attach the head of the sail to the furling halyard, thread the edge of the sail into the 'slot', hoist the halyard all the way, then attach the bottom of the genoa to the can, then the halyard (which is now longer since I hoisted the genoa) to the bottom of the can as well. Then I pull the furling sheet (which is now running afta nd cleated) to roll the sail. Am I right?
I am not sure I understand this. After the sail is hoisted on our ProFurl the Halyard is cleated off as normal on the coach roof or the mast base. The halyard does not run forward to the furler.

Also you preload the drum with furling line when the sail is unfurled. Then when you haul the furling line the sail rolls up. You want a few wraps left when the sail is all the way in.

If the day is strong when you furl, it is likely you will get a couple of extra wraps as the head sail will furl tighter due to the extra tensino from teh stronger wind.
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Old 17-07-2008, 08:47   #9
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I am not sure I understand this. After the sail is hoisted on our ProFurl the Halyard is cleated off as normal on the coach roof or the mast base. The halyard does not run forward to the furler.
Well, I think on this one the genoa halyard gets tied to the drum or can of the system. And that's what it ties to, so the sail can 'wrap up' without getting tangled or hung on anything. I guess. I THINK that is what the previous owner said. Again... my disclaimer: I'm new to this and have never seen, let alone used, a furler.

Also, I don't think I have a choice but to tie an extra piece to the furler halyard. It isn't long enough (it is short by about 2 or 3 feet) and it looks, to me, and at my skill level, at least, to be impossible to replace. The halyward runs through the 'tube' of the forestay and is held in place by some sort of metal clip ehich enables the line to travel through the furling tube.
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Old 17-07-2008, 09:48   #10
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If you look at page 4 of this document. I assumed you had a FF2 furler. If you don't have the document you should get it at this web site and if this isn't your model then get the one you have. It's something you really do want to have aboard in case you need to sort something out.

http://www.sailcdi.com/sailpdf/FF2%20manual%207_06.pdf

You should be able to attach a new line to the end you have and pull it backward out the top. You can try to use the same diameter line then use some sail twine and a needle to sew the two ends together. Then untie the line from the top of the sail and pull the new line through the halyard assembly. The drawing does not appear to present anything that would prevent this since the line must travel smooth so you can raise the jib. You just need to do this before you lower the sail. If you tie a new piece on with a knot you won't be able to lower the sail since the knot needs to go up the opening.
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Old 17-07-2008, 10:31   #11
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Paul is correct. Use the current halyard as a messenger and replace the whole line with new. The cdi has the halyard intregal with the track. It does not use the jib halyard that goes down the mast. I like this set up. The track never wraps the jib halyard at the top. I can use the jib halyard for other purposes, like hauling the dink on board.
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Old 17-07-2008, 10:32   #12
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I think Profurl uses the jib halyard.......

to raise the jib and stays attached like on a regular hanked jib.

A CDI uses its own internal halyard (wire on mine) and a messanger line. You attach the messanger to a metal slide that runs in a track on the foil. You raise the sail, feeding it into the track on the other side of the foil as you go. When the sail is hoisted to the top you tie the metal slide to the attachment point on the drum and remove the messanger line. There is nothing to tangle or become wrapped around the furler. The only trouble with this system is you MUST remember to attach the messenger before lowering the sail or that little metal slide will go all the way up the foil making it nearly impossible to retreave. Don't ask how I know this...........m
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Old 17-07-2008, 11:44   #13
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That's exactly right! But I don't have enough line to attach it to the drum once the sail ir raised b/c the guys at the boatyard cut the line when they were stepping and tuning the mast. Now, to attach a new line to the metal clip which runs along the wire, I think I would need to take apart the entire system (which I simply can't afford to do, and I don't know enough about it to do it myself). So the only solution I could think of was just tying a new piece of line, about two feet in length, to the halyward line so I have enough to tie to the bottom of the drum. When sailing, I think the tension will be on the leach side of the sail and not on the knots. But again I will be the first to admit... I don't have a clue.

I know, I am probably confusing the hell out of everyone and I am sure everyone will stop reading my posts.
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Old 17-07-2008, 12:41   #14
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Adcurium - Which line was cut. The one that attaches to the head of the sail - or - the one that secures the end of the halyard to the drum when the sails raised?
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Old 17-07-2008, 13:10   #15
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Adcurium - Which line was cut. The one that attaches to the head of the sail - or - the one that secures the end of the halyard to the drum when the sails raised?
It was the line that secures the end of the halyard to the drum when the sail is raised.

The line that attaches to the head of the sail is fine.
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