Cruisers Forum
 


Join CruisersForum Today

Reply
 
Thread Tools Rate Thread Display Modes
Old 06-12-2009, 13:01   #1
Registered User
 
FraidNot's Avatar

Join Date: Nov 2009
Boat: Oceanis 411
Posts: 239
Rig Failures

I have heard from local riggers that the Beneteau's and Jeaneau's have a higher rig failure rate due light 'factory installed' rigging.

Is this right?
What is the typical failure mode that people have seen?
__________________

__________________
FraidNot
FraidNot is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 06-12-2009, 13:25   #2
Senior Cruiser
 
maxingout's Avatar

Cruisers Forum Supporter

Join Date: Dec 2006
Location: Fort Pierce, Phoenix
Boat: Privilege 39 Catamaran, Exit Only
Posts: 2,606
I don't know about Junneaus and Beneteaus, but I know that I always check my rigging before I sail offshore. Many times I have found a broken strand of wire, and I replace it before heading offshore. For me the broken wire is almost always where the wire emerges from the swage.

I get in the habit of checking my rig when I arrive in port so that I can get things fixed early rather than at the last minute before I am leaving.

I have replaced wires in Bora Bora, Fiji, New Zealand, Australia, Turkey, and Gibraltar.
__________________

__________________
Dave -Sailing Vessel Exit Only

http://SailingUNI.com
http://maxingout.com
http://PositiveThinkingSailor.com
maxingout is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 06-12-2009, 13:34   #3
Vendor
 
witzgall's Avatar

Join Date: Oct 2006
Location: Eastern Shore, MD
Boat: Camper Nicholson 44 Ketch
Posts: 1,775
This is my latest, 'largest' phobia while sailing...that the rig is going to come down.

I guess what scares me is that while you can see some broken strands, I hear that sometimes the weakest link is in a place where you may not necessarily be able to see it.

I have some good references for learning more about rigging on some of the manufacturer's sites...but do any of you have good references for books that have helped them understand rigging, maintenance and tuning that they highly recommend?

Thanks!
__________________
witzgall is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 06-12-2009, 13:35   #4
Vendor
 
witzgall's Avatar

Join Date: Oct 2006
Location: Eastern Shore, MD
Boat: Camper Nicholson 44 Ketch
Posts: 1,775
P.S. This is actually 'High Heels' posting, Witzgall's wife...Highjacked his computer ;0)
__________________
witzgall is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 06-12-2009, 14:21   #5
Registered User
 
rustypirate's Avatar

Join Date: Nov 2008
Location: Largo, Florida
Boat: Bruce Roberts Offshore 38
Posts: 268
Images: 10
I actually had an upper shroud chainplate part from under the deck while under sail. Luck for me, we were not in too much wind and I was able to get the main down and genoa fulred before any damage was done to the mast. This clearly shows that failure points may not be visible for inspection.

I second the advise to check the rig prior to setting out on a voyage, but also check it following any heavy weather as well to catch any weaknesses that could cause failures.
__________________
Some people are like a slinky...

Not really good for anything, but fun to push down the stairs.
rustypirate is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 06-12-2009, 14:42   #6
Registered User

Join Date: Nov 2009
Location: Bellingham WA
Boat: 17' faering Ironblood, building 34' schooner Javelin
Posts: 305
Rig Failures

Book on rigging:

Brian Toss Rigger's Apprentice
__________________
MichaelC is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 06-12-2009, 15:26   #7
Registered User
 
Hydra's Avatar

Join Date: May 2009
Location: Lorient, Brittany, France
Boat: Gib'Sea 302, 30' - Hydra
Posts: 1,229
I have seen a broken chainplate on a Beneteau "Oceanis 311". The boat was built around 1998 and the breakage occured in 2007 after intensive sailing with a cruising association.

In fact, the part was made by Wichard, of round stock, bend in a U shape with both ends threaded to accept hex nuts under the deck. The breakage on both ends was under deck level, in an area not accessible for inspection without removing the part.

The breakage might have been caused by anaerobic corrosion but, as far as I know, the association owning the boat obtained no explanation from Beneteau or Wichard.

Alain
__________________
Hydra is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 07-12-2009, 00:14   #8
Registered User
 
bewitched's Avatar

Join Date: Sep 2009
Posts: 885
Images: 3
Neither Beneteau nor Jeaneau manufacture rigging - it is supplied by manufacturers who also supply other boat builders - so unless there is a fairly significant design error in the performance specification provided to the rigging supplier I'd doubt if there is any truth in the accusation that the rigs on these boats fail more than others.

Conversely, if there was a problem, the huge number of boats that these manufacturers turn out would soon reveal any design error and it would be rectified PDQ. I am not aware of any such design error in any boats produced by these two.

By observation,the most common mode of rig failure that I have seen is chainplate failure at deck level (actually in the thickness of the deck).
__________________
bewitched is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 07-12-2009, 01:41   #9
Registered User
 
FraidNot's Avatar

Join Date: Nov 2009
Boat: Oceanis 411
Posts: 239
The rigger seemed genuine - but I'm trying to figure out if he was just seeming one part of the market and coming to false conclusions.
__________________
FraidNot
FraidNot is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 07-12-2009, 02:47   #10
Registered User
 
bewitched's Avatar

Join Date: Sep 2009
Posts: 885
Images: 3
Quote:
Originally Posted by FraidNot View Post
The rigger seemed genuine - but I'm trying to figure out if he was just seeming one part of the market and coming to false conclusions.
I think you need to look at it from the viewpoint of whether the rigging is fit for purpose. In my opinion beneteau and jeaneau et al do indeed design rigs for their intended purpose.

There are however, other manufacturers who cater for a market where more redundancy is demanded by buyers (more than one chain plate for the shrouds, cutter rig, thicker mast sections etc). This additional design criteria comes at greater cost and will often impede the performance or ease of handling of the boat. It is therefore not everyones cup of tea.

It is perhaps the difference between these two design scenarios that your rigger is referring to. There are two ways of looking at it:

One is lighter and has less redundancy than the other. The other is overdesigned, costs more money and impedes the performance of the boat.
__________________
bewitched is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 07-12-2009, 03:20   #11
Registered User
 
FraidNot's Avatar

Join Date: Nov 2009
Boat: Oceanis 411
Posts: 239
yeah - I think he does a lot of work for the racers in the area.
__________________

__________________
FraidNot
FraidNot is offline   Reply With Quote
Reply

Thread Tools
Display Modes Rate This Thread
Rate This Thread:

Posting Rules
You may not post new threads
You may not post replies
You may not post attachments
You may not edit your posts

BB code is On
Smilies are On
[IMG] code is On
HTML code is Off
Trackbacks are Off
Pingbacks are Off
Refbacks are Off


Similar Threads
Thread Thread Starter Forum Replies Last Post
Hurth / ZF M15A Transmission Failures tomj Propellers & Drive Systems 138 06-05-2016 05:05
Liferaft Failures Woods Designs Monohull Sailboats 85 25-08-2009 08:01
Maine Passage - Successes and failures, Moving On... skipgundlach General Sailing Forum 2 20-08-2008 09:20
Bilge Pump Failures ? GordMay The Sailor's Confessional 6 14-08-2003 02:23
Equipment Failures GordMay Construction, Maintenance & Refit 2 31-03-2003 17:47



Copyright 2002- Social Knowledge, LLC All Rights Reserved.

All times are GMT -7. The time now is 22:50.


Google+
Powered by vBulletin® Version 3.8.8 Beta 1
Copyright ©2000 - 2017, vBulletin Solutions, Inc.
Social Knowledge Networks
Powered by vBulletin® Version 3.8.8 Beta 1
Copyright ©2000 - 2017, vBulletin Solutions, Inc.

ShowCase vBulletin Plugins by Drive Thru Online, Inc.