Cruisers Forum
 


Join CruisersForum Today

Reply
 
Thread Tools Rate Thread Display Modes
Old 29-03-2013, 19:04   #16
Registered User

Join Date: Mar 2009
Location: Australia, Central Coast.
Boat: Boden 36 Triple chine long keel steel, named Nekeyah
Posts: 776
Re: Protection of gal rigging

Our gal rigging is 25 yrs old and will need replacement in the next few years. We coat it every few years with a mixture 50% silver paint with fishoil. I paint it in situ which is an unpleasant job.

Regards,
Richard.
__________________

__________________
boden36 is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 29-03-2013, 19:28   #17
Registered User

Join Date: Nov 2011
Location: Montegut LA.
Boat: Now we need to get her to Louisiana !! she's ours
Posts: 3,421
Re: Protection of gal rigging

The rigging on our Colvin, was galvie, and was wormed, parceled, and served, as per Colvins equipment list. We replaced it at 25 years, on inspection after replacement found no real damage, other some small rust where the coatings were worn a bunch ! We replaced with the same stuff and it's still on the boat and looks good !! I know its a bunch of trouble to do this old style hand work, and it's some nasty to do but Galvie will last darn near forever if done right !!( and really looks ship shape when done! We got a lot of thumbs up by old timers who liked the old style looks of our rigging !) just sayin, galvie is cheaper and by using the old style coating ya never need to oil or treat the wire again !!
__________________

__________________
Bob and Connie
bobconnie is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 29-03-2013, 21:42   #18
Registered User

Join Date: Nov 2009
Location: Bellingham WA
Boat: 17' faering Ironblood, building 34' schooner Javelin
Posts: 305
Re: Protection of gal rigging

Stretch your rigging wire between two strong [STRONG] attachments. Wrap the wire with CLOTH electrician tape [not plastic]. Consult Brian Toss' book Rigger's Apprentice. Make the flying mallet and use tarred nylon net twine in a coil on the flying mallet. Once you start it, you stand there jerking the wire up and down and the flying mallet will serve the entire length in very short order. The flying mallet will serve the system so tightly it will squeeze the tarring out of the cloth electrician tape and add to the tarring on the nylon serving twine. It is easy to do, and nearly permanent. AND it is traditional as hell. No gaff rigger should be without it. On my Colvin boat it was still pristine when I sold her.
__________________
MichaelC is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 30-03-2013, 05:04   #19
Registered User
 
Snowpetrel's Avatar

Join Date: Jul 2012
Location: Hobart
Boat: Alloy Peterson 40
Posts: 3,071
Quote:
Originally Posted by MichaelC View Post
Stretch your rigging wire between two strong [STRONG] attachments. Wrap the wire with CLOTH electrician tape [not plastic]. Consult Brian Toss' book Rigger's Apprentice. Make the flying mallet and use tarred nylon net twine in a coil on the flying mallet. Once you start it, you stand there jerking the wire up and down and the flying mallet will serve the entire length in very short order. The flying mallet will serve the system so tightly it will squeeze the tarring out of the cloth electrician tape and add to the tarring on the nylon serving twine. It is easy to do, and nearly permanent. AND it is traditional as hell. No gaff rigger should be without it. On my Colvin boat it was still pristine when I sold her.
I can vouch for the flying mallet. We did all the serving on the foremast of a 100 foot brigantine (soren larsen) by hand the old way. Then while rigging james craig I got the chance to try the flying mallet. It took a few tries to get the wire tension and slackness just right, but when I did I got it done in a quarter of the time.

Still on a simple non traditional yacht I would just use aluminium talurit swages and replace the wire every 10 years or so.
__________________
My Ramblings
Snowpetrel is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 30-03-2013, 05:28   #20
Certifiable Refitter/Senior Wannbe
 
Wotname's Avatar

Cruisers Forum Supporter

Join Date: Jan 2008
Location: South of 43 S, Australia
Boat: Van DeStat Super Dogger 31'
Posts: 7,331
Re: Protection of gal rigging

An old time rigger I knew used to take each length of rigging and attach to two strong points pulled reasonably tight. Then he would untwist it a little (using a lever through an eye splice or whatever) until the fibre core was clearly visible and the individual strands where opened a little. He would then saturate the entire length and especially the core with linseed oil (don't recall if it was boiled or raw).

I suspect fish oil could work just as well - fish don't rust do they
__________________
All men dream: but not equally. Those who dream by night in the dusty recesses of their minds wake in the day to find it was vanity: but the dreamers of the day are dangereous men, for they may act their dreams with open eyes, to make it possible. T.E. Lawrence
Wotname is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 04-04-2013, 05:37   #21
Registered User

Join Date: Aug 2010
Location: sydney, australia
Boat: 38 roberts ketch
Posts: 1,021
Images: 3
Re: Protection of gal rigging

nothing. It's gal., it's cheap, strong even when its rusty, which is when you start thinking about replacing it. Met a guy in Auckland a couple of years ago told me he slops lanoline on a rag and hauls it up the wires with a halyard once a year - cant be bothered meself, i've had boats with rusty gal rigging all my life, never broke a single wire yet.
__________________
charliehows is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 10-04-2013, 19:46   #22
Registered User
 
kefroeschner's Avatar

Join Date: Feb 2012
Location: Livermore California, St Petersburg Florida
Boat: Morgan, Ocean Racer, 45'
Posts: 75
Re: Protection of gal rigging

GREAT THREAD. I was about to ask if anyone out there thought I'd be crazy to replace the stainless on Orion, a Morgan 45, with galvanized wire, flemish eye splices, no swages, etc. I am now firmly convinced. Thanks.
__________________
kefroeschner is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 27-09-2013, 15:06   #23
Registered User
 
lonesoldier0408's Avatar

Join Date: Jun 2013
Boat: Luger, Southwind, 21
Posts: 357
Re: Protection of gal rigging

Thanks to all who made this information possible. Need to re-rig a Luger Southwind 21 as some of the rigging has rust to seperation.
__________________
lonesoldier0408 is online now   Reply With Quote
Old 28-09-2013, 00:04   #24
Registered User

Join Date: Oct 2011
Posts: 2,433
Re: Protection of gal rigging

Just be careful of using galvy for head stays or inner forestays. If you use 7 by 7 or 7 by 19 galvy, you will wear out your bronze hanks much faster than if you have 1 by 19 SS. The hanks will also remove the galvanizing so that you will have weeping rust on your head sails. It probably works fine for the rest of the rig. _____Grant.
__________________
gjordan is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 15-10-2013, 16:27   #25
Registered User

Join Date: Aug 2010
Location: sydney, australia
Boat: 38 roberts ketch
Posts: 1,021
Images: 3
Re: Protection of gal rigging

Quote:
Originally Posted by gjordan View Post
Just be careful of using galvy for head stays or inner forestays. If you use 7 by 7 or 7 by 19 galvy, you will wear out your bronze hanks much faster than if you have 1 by 19 SS. The hanks will also remove the galvanizing so that you will have weeping rust on your head sails. It probably works fine for the rest of the rig. _____Grant.
+1 - i did use s/s for both my forestays because of the hanks.
__________________

__________________
charliehows is offline   Reply With Quote
Reply

Tags
rigging

Thread Tools
Display Modes Rate This Thread
Rate This Thread:

Posting Rules
You may not post new threads
You may not post replies
You may not post attachments
You may not edit your posts

BB code is On
Smilies are On
[IMG] code is On
HTML code is Off
Trackbacks are Off
Pingbacks are Off
Refbacks are Off




Copyright 2002- Social Knowledge, LLC All Rights Reserved.

All times are GMT -7. The time now is 13:12.


Google+
Powered by vBulletin® Version 3.8.8 Beta 1
Copyright ©2000 - 2017, vBulletin Solutions, Inc.
Social Knowledge Networks
Powered by vBulletin® Version 3.8.8 Beta 1
Copyright ©2000 - 2017, vBulletin Solutions, Inc.

ShowCase vBulletin Plugins by Drive Thru Online, Inc.