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Old 25-02-2010, 23:32   #1
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Pocket Booms ?

Does anyone here have any experience with these? I've seen a few ads and the concept is intriguing, but I have no direct experience and haven't been able to find any local boats that have one. I will be replacing my 17' boom with a 22' boom and am curious how well they work.

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Thomas
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Old 26-02-2010, 00:43   #2
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I had to google this one ....and wasn't too surprised when it wasn't something for a very small boat.

Conceptually I think it's a good idea. Made from lightweight composites it wouldn't add much more weight than a conventional alu boom. Properly designed and integral with a lazy jack system, I think it will work well.

Will be interesting to see how the concept develops
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Old 26-02-2010, 00:55   #3
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Actually, I was thinking of doing it in aluminum, shouldn't be all that hard to fabricate I wouldn't think. Was also thinking of perhaps using a stack pack type system in lieu of the lazy jacks. In any case, as the sail should flake into the pocket, it would eliminate the need for a sail cover pretty much. Interesting idea anyway.
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Old 26-02-2010, 01:24   #4
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In aluminium? would need some thinking about. Structurally a 'pipe' section is fairly strong, a 'half pipe' isn't (think drain pipe vs gutter). These forces are easily resolved in a composite structure - not so with an alu extrusion - perhaps an alu fabrication would need to incorporate some 'ribs' to resolve the distortion?
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Old 26-02-2010, 01:51   #5
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I was thinking about two pieces. The outer would form the basket, the inner would provide the strength. The inner member would be welded in place and form the structural "tube" so to speak at the bottom of the boom. I'll post a pic/drawing when I get to that point. So, the outer member is a widened U shape and the inner member is a flattened upside down U shape the forms a structural tube running along the bottom. Clear as mud, right?

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Old 26-02-2010, 08:24   #6
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Is anybody concerned about added windage with something that wide?
Especially with the reduction in weight.

I would think that it might make jybing more hazardous.
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Old 26-02-2010, 10:09   #7
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Good point! Dunno the answer.
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Old 27-02-2010, 05:47   #8
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should be ok - no more than an inboom furling
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Old 27-02-2010, 07:18   #9
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Seen them on many maxis and now on smaller (40') boats too. They often come as a pack when a carbo stick is ordered. I think they are a great idea for big mains but sure could be used on smaller boats too - probably your local carbo spar manufacturer will make one if you ask them. At a price though.

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Old 27-02-2010, 07:32   #10
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The only ones i have seen are built out of carbon fiber and are ridiculously heavy, people assume they are light because its been drummed into them that carbon = light, the more recent Tartans use them and they are as sexy as hell and i like the concept but they need to be much much lighter,it would be fairly easy to do in a wood epoxy composite, another idea would be a trussed aluminum tube space frame with a heat shrunk fabric skin.
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Old 27-02-2010, 08:29   #11
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The carbon booms are very expensive. A 22 foot section will set you back $20 to $40k. We are adding aluminum tube extensions to our boom that are bolted to the existing section. I'll post pictures this summer when completed. The probrelmwe have is 250# of mainsail flopping over the side of the boom so the extensions should hold this up. Look at many of the single handed boats and you'll see them.
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Old 27-02-2010, 08:52   #12
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Why are the carbo ones heavy?

My cross-country skiing poles are carbo and they are 150 grams a pair (alloy ones are roughly 6 times heavier) ... so why is the boom so heavy?

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Old 27-02-2010, 09:55   #13
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$34,800 in carbon! Pricey for sure. Weight was about 300# I would certainly be interested in seeing the aluminum extrusions or perhaps a sketch. Sounds like a great idea.

Thomas
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