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Old 31-03-2010, 16:29   #16
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I made an offer on a boat today with sails listed as "fair" I'm assuming that this will mean replacement is required pretty soon. If I go to Lee sails, price is very good, but they appear to have only one type of sail fabric. Doyle has quite a variety of fabrics and grades, and I suspect a lot higher price. Is there any advantage in a higher price sail if the planned use is cruising the Carribean and maybe a trip across to the med?

Bill
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Old 31-03-2010, 18:30   #17
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Yes, "fair" translates to "worthless and ugly" in sail lingo ... except for my own.

Sail buying is very competitive. I think you'll get what you can afford ... "what you pay for."

For general sailing, like you propose, my personal opinion, and I've bought many many sails from HK made mailorder sails to North 3DL, is basic dacron is just fine. Insist on first grade name brand cloth ... which may rule out some of the mailorder sails.

Good old dacron wears out nice, steady and slow. And replacing is less costly so it might be done more often than only when the sails reach "fair".
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Old 31-03-2010, 19:33   #18
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Sailmakers

Thanks for the advice.

Is Lee sails a good quality provider, do you know?

Actually, I'd appreciate any recommendations for quality suppliers.

Bill
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Old 01-04-2010, 11:14   #19
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i got a quote from them 2 yrs ago for a main for a GulfStar 37 $1460.00 about six weeks delivery
haven't done it yet. went to Portland Me. Boat Builder's show couple weeks ago and got a quote from Bonnell sails in Rockport Me. for $1680. 2 reefs logo, sail # cunningham leach control four battens 7.5 Bainbridge cloth. that wass not a show quote just his standard price. needless to say where i'm going to get my sail from.
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Old 01-04-2010, 11:21   #20
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Not a great difference is it?

For a small difference I'd much rather keep a local guy employed.

Bill
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Old 01-04-2010, 16:25   #21
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Agreed.

I have met Bonnel. Seems like a straight up fellow
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Old 03-04-2010, 08:08   #22
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dropped my genoa at Anson's yesterday and talking to the guy that took in my sail he told me all major sail makers if not all of them have their sails made in Srilanka now because of labor cost.
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Old 03-04-2010, 08:52   #23
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Agreed. A sailmaker in Maine revised a quote for us based on a new manufacturing facility in Sri Lanka.

The critical parts are still measuring the rig and selecting the proper cloth for your application. That is where the sail consultant earns his/her keep.
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Old 03-04-2010, 10:29   #24
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Dang! More jobs gone off-shore. This is good for the third world, of course, and when viewed from a distance is no doubt a good thing for the world. Us in the west will have to get used to having less of the world's resources to ourselves.

Bill
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Old 04-04-2010, 09:56   #25
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We had a new main made by Lee sails in 2008 which has now done two Med seasons. We are very pleased with it. They also got the stak-a-pak wrong and replaced it free of charge.

We got quotes from both French (where we were) and British (who made the last main) and there was about GBP100 between them. There was nearly GBP1000 difference between them and Lee. We are great supporters of local producers but simply cannot afford that level of subsidy.

The sail is is standard dacron, made to their standard specs - eg triple reinforced reefing points rather than rings - and if we were going to extensively cruise in high latitudes I would want much more control over many detailed elements (eg patching at the foot, clew and head) than I could get mail order. But for our needs (Mediterranean/tropics) it is plenty good enough.
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Old 04-04-2010, 10:41   #26
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Sadly, I agree on the level of subsidy, especially when it appears that the local manufacturers have gone off-shore and are not supporting local workers anymore.

I was amazed to get a very fast response from a local Lee rep here in landlocked, semi-arid CALGARY! He knows his stuff too.

Bill
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Old 05-04-2010, 05:55   #27
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As the topic moves from sailing to economics, the economist-sailor must add a few notes. Groan universally...

Before roller furling, boats had more sails. There was more work for sail makers. Racing was different, more distance racing requiring more sail choices. More work for sail makers. Hand designed and cut and sewn sails were more labor intensive. Production boats mean production sails. None of this is in and of itself bad. It is a change.

The process of making, using, and servicing sails has been radically changed over the last thirty years. It is much less labor intensive and less personal. Rationalization of the sail making business must follow.

On a positive note. Notice how busy the custom canvass work makers are. Custom work for custom clients, labor intensive, personal service required....
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