Cruisers Forum
 


Join CruisersForum Today

Reply
 
Thread Tools Rate Thread Display Modes
Old 05-12-2015, 17:32   #1
Registered User

Join Date: Dec 2013
Location: St. Louis
Boat: 1983 oday 22'
Posts: 661
New Boom?

I have been the owner of a 1983 O'day 22 sailboat for 2 years now. I bought it to learn how to sail, and it's been a great learning boat.

But now that I'm more experienced, and interested in racing, I'm unhappy with the sail and reefing plan. Currently I have a "roller boom" reefing system. Basically, you pull the boom out towards the stern, and turn it, rolling the mainsail onto the boom. VERY difficult to reef, so much so, that we don't go out of we have to reef. Plus, we are only able to roll it so far as the "slugs" that hold the sail onto the mast only slide down so far. Bad system.

The other things I don't like are the fact that the boat doesn't have a traveler, no boom vang.. no boom topping lift, and the jibsheet lead (track) is set so far aft that any adjustments make no difference, what-so-ever to the trim of the jib.

So, what do I do? Would I need to get a whole new boom to change the reefing system? or could I modify the current boom to accomodate a slab reefing system? What about a traveler and boom vang? can that be added to the current "rolling boom"?

I can see where I could put a traveler... however, I can't put a traveler on, without changing the reefing system, because any block and tackle system would have to attach to the bottom of the boom. I would no longer be able to roll the boom.

Or, do you think it is too expensive, or too much work, and I'd be better off looking for a new boat? We only paid about $3000 for this boat. we like it, but I really want to be able to trim for max performance.

Advice?
__________________

__________________
scarlet is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 05-12-2015, 19:58   #2
Senior Cruiser
 
Jim Cate's Avatar

Cruisers Forum Supporter

Join Date: May 2008
Location: cruising SW Pacific
Boat: Jon Sayer 1-off 46 ft fract rig sloop strip plank in W Red Cedar
Posts: 11,454
Re: New Boom?

It shouldn't be too big a project to convert to a conventional setup. You will need to run some lines through the boom: one clear to the outer end which will be the outhaul, and one for each set of reef points that you want to install on the sail. you will need a fitting on the end of the boom to contain a sheave for the outhaul, and cheek blocks on the boom for each reef point, along with exit slots for the reefing line(s). You will need some sort of attachment at the tack - a big saddle and a shackle will do, and some means of attaching the tack cringles for the reefs. There are hooks made for this very purpose!

The control lines (main sheet and vang) can be attached with webbing strops around the boom, held in place with webbing saddles. The clew cringle is attached to the outhaul and to another webbing strop, this one free to slide in and out along the boom as you adjust the outhaul. Many race boats and some cruising boats (like mine, for instance) use just this sort of rigging, for it is light, strong and inexpensive, and it doesn't put stress risers into the boom like tangs do.

So, I reckon that it is a very approachable improvement to you boat!

Jim
__________________

__________________
Jim and Ann s/v Insatiable II , lying Port Cygnet, Tasmania once again
Jim Cate is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 05-12-2015, 23:25   #3
Registered User

Join Date: Dec 2012
Location: Me Houston boat Nanny Cay
Boat: Freydis 49' Cat
Posts: 164
Re: New Boom?

I say sell it and move up to a class you can grow with. j22 /24if you want to stay in the same size range or j 30 for a weekender you can race.
Regards
Paul
__________________
Steel sails is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 06-12-2015, 02:26   #4
Registered User
 
UNCIVILIZED's Avatar

Join Date: Jun 2014
Location: Up the mast, looking for clean wind.
Boat: Currently Shopping, & Heavily in LUST!
Posts: 5,629
Re: New Boom?

I'd suggest doing mostly what Jim's recommending. But prior to undertaking any modifications, get copies of a few (free) hardware catalogs; Harken, Schaeffer, Ronstan, Garhauer, etc. That & studying the other, below, references.

They'll show you how to reconfigure your boom & various control hardware, in addition to adding a few pieces, so that you can easily setup your boat for "slab reefing". Which is what 90-something% of most boats have on their mainsails.
And companies like Schaeffer, etc. even make bolt on kits to let you easily reconfigure your boat.

When Jim talks about strops/straps. You can easily splice your own out of a few pieces of Spectra. Such are used on boats from the smallest sizes, all the way up through Maxi's. And are cheap, as well as easy to make.
In addition to being very chafe & UV resistant.

Also, this is a pretty good book covering rig tuning, sail tuning, & the various ways to configure sailing controls. Including the ones which you're asking about.
Sail and Rig Tuning: Ivar Dedekam: 9781898660675: Amazon.com: Books

There's also the online site www.L-36.com which is a wealth of information on all kinds of things boat tuning. Including how to make & or setup all of the things which Jim & I mentioned.
Ditto on finding the setup knowledge via one of the many one-design boat type, online, tuning guides. It's all FREE!

Also, 99% of the gear which you'll need to do the modifications that you want to do can be picked up used, for cheap. Especially on a boat that size.
So once you figure out what you need, it shouldn't cost you $200, if not half of that; plus some elbow grease, & a few hours with some tools.

PS: Not to talk you out of reconfiguring things. But plenty of boats with roller reefing have travelers. They simply have the ends of the sheet connected between; the block for the sheet on the traveler car, & a bolt through the butt end of the boom, which holds the other end of your sheet.
__________________

The Uncommon Thing, The Hard Thing, The Important Thing (in Life): Making Promises to Yourself, And Keeping Them.
UNCIVILIZED is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 06-12-2015, 07:02   #5
Registered User

Join Date: Dec 2013
Location: St. Louis
Boat: 1983 oday 22'
Posts: 661
Re: New Boom?

Such good info.. all of you, thank you!

Jim, do I really need to run full reefing lines? or can I just use ties? (i.e. run a tie through an eyebolt on the boom, and tie it through the grommet on the sail?)

Paul, I would love to buy a bigger boat. Something we could spend the weekend on, etc. Currently debating that with my husband.

Uncivilized... I have to tell you, I've been coming here over 2 years, I've been to boat shows... classes, sailing with friends, etc, and never once did anyone recommend getting a catalog of hardware. That's one of those "why didn't I think of that?" moments. Brilliant. I'm going to go out and order a couple today. great idea.

This will be my first major project on the boat. We've done plenty of small stuff, but this would be big as it would require adding some attachments (i.e making holes. ) I'd much rather learn on this small, inexpensive boat, than have to learn on a huge, expensive catamaran..

One other thing... since I'm considering moving my Jib/cart track forward quite a bit.... it's probably going to leave some open holes in the deck... boat is fiberglass. How do you fix those? would I need to actually "fill, sand, paint" or is there another way?
__________________
scarlet is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 06-12-2015, 10:08   #6
Senior Cruiser
 
roverhi's Avatar

Cruisers Forum Supporter

Join Date: Aug 2005
Location: Kona, Hawaii, Carlsbad, CA
Boat: 1969 Pearson 35 #108 & 1976 Sabre 28
Posts: 6,005
Send a message via Yahoo to roverhi
Re: New Boom?

Go with cheek blocks for the clew reefing points. Position one for each reef point so that when the sail is reefed the pull on the line will be at least a 45 degree angle from the clewcringle pullling aft and down. Be aware the sail will stretch so pt the cheek block far enough aft so you can be sure to flatten the foot of the sail under the windpressure common when you need to reef. You can screw a short piece of genoa track to the boom and buy cars specifically for reefing that will allow you to move the reef points as experience dictates. The hardware tends to be a bit spendy but occasionally turns up on Ebay if you can be patient. If the sail is loose footed or has slides, run the reefing line from cheek block, through the cringle, then tie the bitter end around the boom. If the foot is a bolt rope, you'll need a padeye to secure the bitter end. A cleat(s) on the boom near the gooseneck to secure the other end of the clew reefing line should suffice. Doubt that you'd need a winch on a boat your size.

Best thing for the tack reef point is a hook on goose neck. There may be a problem securing this to the gooseneck. If so, you can use line with a padeye on one side of the mast and a cleat on the other. Position the hardwar so you are applying force to pull the tack against the mast and down. You've got to counteract the force of the clew reef pulling out board and the halyard vertically. You don't want either of these forces taken up by a slide on the sail.

What Jim describes is internal reefing and needs a custom end fitting on the boom. Way cheaper and easiler handled with external lines, a cheek block or two and cleat(s). Harken used to have some good illustrations on slab reefing in their catalogue. You'll also have to have reinforcing patches and cringles installed on the main. You can probably get by without the intermdiate cringles to save money. They are only there to gather the reefed sail and may not be necessary. Don't need them for reefing my much larger boat.
__________________
Peter O.
'Ae'a Pearson 35
roverhi is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 06-12-2015, 23:07   #7
Registered User
 
UNCIVILIZED's Avatar

Join Date: Jun 2014
Location: Up the mast, looking for clean wind.
Boat: Currently Shopping, & Heavily in LUST!
Posts: 5,629
Re: New Boom?

Quote:
Originally Posted by roverhi View Post
Go with cheek blocks for the clew reefing points. Position one for each reef point so that when the sail is reefed the pull on the line will be at least a 45 degree angle from the clewcringle pullling aft and down. Be aware the sail will stretch so pt the cheek block far enough aft so you can be sure to flatten the foot of the sail under the windpressure common when you need to reef.

In terms of where to position hardware & lines, in order to get good leads for each reefing line. Typically, with one leg of the reefing line coming straight down to the boom, & the other going to the boom's aft end, your leads will work out well.
Such is how they're done on boats which have sheaves in the aft ends of their booms. To which, I think Jim Cate referred.

That said, some of the hardware which I alluded to earlier lets you fine tune the lead angles on your reefing lines, if they need it. For instance Reefing : Schaefer Marine, Inc.
Which is what's being talked about, directly below.

You can screw a short piece of genoa track to the boom and buy cars specifically for reefing that will allow you to move the reef points as experience dictates. The hardware tends to be a bit spendy but occasionally turns up on Ebay if you can be patient. If the sail is loose footed or has slides, run the reefing line from cheek block, through the cringle, then tie the bitter end around the boom. If the foot is a bolt rope, you'll need a padeye to secure the bitter end.

For sails which have bolt ropes connecting them to the boom, it's common to put slots into the main, so that the reefing lines can then be tied through the main, around the boom. Sometimes they're reinforced, but many times, especially on smaller boats, they're not.
And if you're not comfortable putting them in, it's an easy job for the sailmaker. Only taking a couple of minutes.

A cleat(s) on the boom near the gooseneck to secure the other end of the clew reefing line should suffice. Doubt that you'd need a winch on a boat your size.

Best thing for the tack reef point is a hook on goose neck. There may be a problem securing this to the gooseneck. If so, you can use line with a padeye on one side of the mast and a cleat on the other. Position the hardwar so you are applying force to pull the tack against the mast and down. You've got to counteract the force of the clew reef pulling out board and the halyard vertically. You don't want either of these forces taken up by a slide on the sail.

When it comes to the tack connections, you can "cheat", by putting a carabiner or stainless steel snap hook onto a short pendant. Then when you go to reef, you clip it to the cringle, or the ring on webbing, hanging from the cringle.
And you either have the pendant setup at the proper length so that it automatically takes up all of the load at the tack when you re-tension the halyard. Or you can put a cleat on the spar so that you can adjust the pendant length/tension that way.

Plan B for this connection, is to run a line through each reef point, from one side of the spar, to a cleat or other way to fix it in place, on the other side of the spar, when taking a reef.
On some boats, these lines are led aft to the cockpit.

What Jim describes is internal reefing and needs a custom end fitting on the boom. Way cheaper and easiler handled with external lines, a cheek block or two and cleat(s). Harken used to have some good illustrations on slab reefing in their catalogue. You'll also have to have reinforcing patches and cringles installed on the main. You can probably get by without the intermdiate cringles to save money. They are only there to gather the reefed sail and may not be necessary. Don't need them for reefing my much larger boat.
Pretty much all of the various rigging catalogs are downloadable, gratis. However, it helps to have at least 1 hard copy catalog, if not two. That way, when you're working on deck you aren't fretting over keeping some type of computer clean & dry. And or, from sliding off of the deck & into the ocean.

Plus it's good to leave a copy onboard permanently, so that you always have your references handy. And also, keep your old catalogs, for say 5yrs min. As there will likely be lots of times that you wind up working on older hardware. And the older catalogs can come in REAL handy at that point, via providing tech specs, schematics, or part numbers to use to order things with.

AKA, don't let the wife or GF toss them because they're from 2012 ;-)
__________________

The Uncommon Thing, The Hard Thing, The Important Thing (in Life): Making Promises to Yourself, And Keeping Them.
UNCIVILIZED is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 15-12-2015, 16:36   #8
Senior Cruiser
 
roverhi's Avatar

Cruisers Forum Supporter

Join Date: Aug 2005
Location: Kona, Hawaii, Carlsbad, CA
Boat: 1969 Pearson 35 #108 & 1976 Sabre 28
Posts: 6,005
Send a message via Yahoo to roverhi
Re: New Boom?

Here's the boom track reefing system on eBay if you are still going that route. Barton Marine 41483 Slab Reefing Kit | eBay
__________________
Peter O.
'Ae'a Pearson 35
roverhi is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 15-12-2015, 19:12   #9
Registered User

Join Date: Dec 2013
Location: St. Louis
Boat: 1983 oday 22'
Posts: 661
Re: New Boom?

Quote:
Originally Posted by roverhi View Post
Here's the boom track reefing system on eBay if you are still going that route. Barton Marine 41483 Slab Reefing Kit | eBay
awesome! thank you.

still arguing with hubby about this project. He thinks the boat is fine as it is.. but I have the NEED for SPEED!!!! There is a lot of fine tuning I want to do to maximize speed!
__________________
scarlet is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 15-12-2015, 19:56   #10
Registered User

Join Date: Aug 2008
Location: Pacific Northwest, USA
Boat: 31' Corsair/Farrier trimaran, Lauwersmeer Cruiser in Europe canals. 19' Lightning
Posts: 234
Re: New Boom?

Don't know about ODay but many boats/classes are raced one design and have national organizations. I Googled Oday and came up with this, there were others too so google around: http://oday.sailboatowners.com/. If theres a fleet nearby you will get all kinds of expert advice from people who know exactly what to do to upgrade your boat in the best and most efficient and/or least expensive way. Serious racers who often upgrade might have old usable parts laying around you can get for a song or free, including sails that may be better than yours. I was a member of the Lightning class and I and other local fleet members would jump at the chance to meet a fellow owner at their boat to lend a hand or advice. Its called fleet building. I am sure there are enthusiasts for your class that will help you in very specific ways. Racing one design is a great way to learn to sail well and gain confidence in heavy air with knowledgeable people around to learn from.
__________________

__________________
ejlindahl is offline   Reply With Quote
Reply

Thread Tools
Display Modes Rate This Thread
Rate This Thread:

Posting Rules
You may not post new threads
You may not post replies
You may not post attachments
You may not edit your posts

BB code is On
Smilies are On
[IMG] code is On
HTML code is Off
Trackbacks are Off
Pingbacks are Off
Refbacks are Off


Similar Threads
Thread Thread Starter Forum Replies Last Post
Mid-Boom Sheeting And A Broken Boom somedaypam Deck hardware: Rigging, Sails & Hoisting 23 13-12-2014 23:54
Price of new mast and boom??? ryanpeddle85 Monohull Sailboats 8 10-07-2012 21:39
Using Your Boom as a Boom unbusted67 Deck hardware: Rigging, Sails & Hoisting 18 04-10-2011 20:40
Want To Buy: Looking for Dutchman Boom Brake of England or Europe, New / Used filaviasail Classifieds Archive 0 21-12-2010 01:00
Setting-Up In-Boom Outhaul for New Loose-Footed Main - Any Advice? Northeaster Deck hardware: Rigging, Sails & Hoisting 28 02-03-2010 07:39



Copyright 2002- Social Knowledge, LLC All Rights Reserved.

All times are GMT -7. The time now is 01:45.


Google+
Powered by vBulletin® Version 3.8.8 Beta 1
Copyright ©2000 - 2017, vBulletin Solutions, Inc.
Social Knowledge Networks
Powered by vBulletin® Version 3.8.8 Beta 1
Copyright ©2000 - 2017, vBulletin Solutions, Inc.

ShowCase vBulletin Plugins by Drive Thru Online, Inc.