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Old 08-04-2016, 10:23   #16
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Re: Milwaukee 0721 angle drill

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Originally Posted by captmikecoin View Post
I'm really tempted to buy one of these to help with sail furling. However being in Europe I have to import one and so can't see the thing before buying. In particular I want to be sure it will not be too heavy for my wife, who is not strong, to use. Does anyone know what this machine weighs? Milwaukee have been distinctly unhelpful.
Cheers,
Mike
If I am reading this right? What about the torque considerations for your wife?
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Old 08-04-2016, 10:33   #17
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Re: Milwaukee 0721 angle drill

Web page here, <https://www.milwaukeetool.com/power-tools/cordless/0721-20>, hope this helps!
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Old 08-04-2016, 10:46   #18
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Re: Milwaukee 0721 angle drill

I appreciate what you say about torque reaction but it will rarely need full torque and the torque reaction I think will never come on suddenly in a jerk in the way we intend to use it. It's to make furling the yankee and main less hard work. We're not looking to tighten big genoa sheets or haul people up the mast. We use the windlass for the latter.

All the above is said without personal experience so it remains to be seen. The drill is about twice as long as a winch handle though so more leverage.

Cheers,
Mike
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Old 08-04-2016, 11:02   #19
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Re: Milwaukee 0721 angle drill

You mentioned furling. Be careful, this is a powerful tool and could easily damage something important. You might never know when something is stuck and the drill just powers through it. That being said I used one on to raise the main on a wildcat catamaran. Without the drill I would still be hoisting that sucker up.
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Old 08-04-2016, 11:08   #20
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Re: Milwaukee 0721 angle drill

I don't think it's too heavy for anyone. And agree, that fresh batteries can easily do two/ three trips up on a charge. Use the low gear, it's like riding up in a elevator! Just be aware that the back of the angle drill will need to be braced by her (hip) or tying/ wedging/ blocking it with something fixed into position (for every force there is an equal but opposite force...). But that angle drill is quite long and thereby giving significant mechanical leverage. With the nice variable speed/ slow start this reaction force is not suddenly jarring or intense in my experience. I believe anyone that can do the usual chores of boat life (handling power cords, fenders, carrying jugs of water, wouldn't have any issues operating it. The drill makes easy work raising main/ rolling up genny.

But it should be reminded that no one should go up a mast without a separate safety line (and highly recommended, an extra experienced crew/ helper to keep it just slack enough to not hinder, but at the ready to stop a fall. Very experience crew can operate an electric winch/ angle drill and the safety line. If your Admiral has her hands full with just operating the drill, that leaves this important function to you, and while the guy going up/ down the mast can technically do this, it's not the best situation for a number of reasons.


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Old 08-04-2016, 11:36   #21
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Re: Milwaukee 0721 angle drill

Yes hard to go backwards on comforts. Just so happens my brother has a totally 'tricked out' 53' Gulfstar ketch (motor sailer) and because of health issues is deciding he should start looking for someone that will enjoy their 'luxury' cruising lifestyle as much as they do. Currently in Ft Lauderdale. Yes an older boat, but carries 250 gal of diesel, abt same for water, new sail covers/ total cockpit enclosure, plus an additional full boat length hanging sun shade, ACs, Gen, all modern Garmin two station electronics, so very roomy and all conveniences (including recently installed Espar hydroponic diesel heater that can keep you at 80 degrees up North!). If interested in knowing more, indicate here and I'll get you two together (no broker yet).


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Old 08-04-2016, 12:19   #22
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Re: Milwaukee 0721 angle drill

Quote:
Originally Posted by captmikecoin View Post
I'm really tempted to buy one of these to help with sail furling. However being in Europe I have to import one and so can't see the thing before buying. In particular I want to be sure it will not be too heavy for my wife, who is not strong, to use. Does anyone know what this machine weighs? Milwaukee have been distinctly unhelpful.
Cheers,
Mike
This is a very handy tool that is absolutely terrific in lieu of power winches. Following back surgery, I bought this unit several years ago and used it routinely to haul up my dinghy and outboard hanging from the davits on my catamaran. Prior to the drill, that task was a real workout as it would require more than 12O winch handle revolutions (yes, I counted them once!) and that task would be at the end of the day following the usual sundowners and dinner - not something at all to look forward to. Once I bought the drill, the required dinghy hoisting was NO chore at all and very easy to do. Very easy to manage for ANYONE that can lift the approx. 10 lb drill onto the winch i.e. I emphasize, no challenge at all. It has also been used with equal ease and success in raising the main and hoists up the mast.
This drill has always been one of my best boat accessory acquisitions and it is used daily on the boat. It comes with two batteries and a charger and a charged battery will readily last a week with my daily useage.
Hope this recommendation helps!
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Old 08-04-2016, 13:11   #23
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Re: Milwaukee 0721 angle drill

Quote:
Originally Posted by captmikecoin View Post
I appreciate what you say about torque reaction but it will rarely need full torque and the torque reaction I think will never come on suddenly in a jerk in the way we intend to use it. It's to make furling the yankee and main less hard work. We're not looking to tighten big genoa sheets or haul people up the mast. We use the windlass for the latter.
We use the Milwaukee drill to hoist the main. It was a great addition to the boat. I agree with the comments that the weight is a relative non-issue since it will sit well in the winch -- especially with the replacement chuck. However, the torque can be a surprise. I'm 6'3" and 200#. If I don't get myself set and the drill is on the high speed setting, it will give my upper body a good jolt. Not a reason not to use, but a smaller person needs to be properly braced. My wife is about 130# and has hoisted me up the mast with someone else tailing the halyard. She just sets herself against the bulkhead and uses her hip to stabilize the drill.
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Old 08-04-2016, 13:47   #24
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Re: Milwaukee 0721 angle drill

I faced the same problem as we have 240 volt in Australia, I just bought a new one on ebay older model at a good price wiht 110 charger shipped in from the US it is 28 volt. The 240 Watt chargers are expensive here. I bought a 350 watt 110 inverter that runs off of the boats 12 volt system. It works just fine. Once the winch bit is plug into the winch it cuts the effect of the weight down.

Possibly you should get your wife to teach you to winch in the furler it would cut out the weight problem. As there is no getting around it, it is Solid well made and heavy for this reason it is a worthy piece of gear on the boat. I also bought a cover from Cranker Bits - a padded drill cover it will help keep the drill from damaging your boat. It is a spray cover of sorts...blarb from Crank bits.

"Padded Drill Cover The Padded Drill Cover is made from waterproof nylon covered neoprene sponge (wetsuit material). It comes with a solid spacer to fill the gap between the motor and angle drive - makes the drill much easier to move around - is available in the colors shown. Please specify the color after the auction closes" .        
Don't buy the 18 volt unit it is a wast of time.

As always on a boat everything is a compromise.

Hope this helps.

Skoiern IV


Quote:
Originally Posted by captmikecoin View Post
I'm really tempted to buy one of these to help with sail furling. However being in Europe I have to import one and so can't see the thing before buying. In particular I want to be sure it will not be too heavy for my wife, who is not strong, to use. Does anyone know what this machine weighs? Milwaukee have been distinctly unhelpful.
Cheers,
Mike
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Old 08-04-2016, 14:28   #25
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Re: Milwaukee 0721 angle drill

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Originally Posted by kryg View Post
.

Possibly you should get your wife to teach you to winch in the furler it would cut out the weight problem. ............. I also bought a cover from Cranker Bits - a padded drill cover it will help keep the drill from damaging your boat. It is a spray cover of sorts...blarb from Crank bits.

" .        
Don't buy the 18 volt unit it is a wast of time.


Skoiern IV
In fact I would be using the drill most of the time as she is usually on the helm with me doing the heavier work. I do want her to be able to use it though just in case.

Thanks for the tips re: cover and 18V drills and thanks again to all for your recommendations. I'm reaching for my wallet!

Cheers,
Mike
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Old 08-04-2016, 15:22   #26
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Re: Milwaukee 0721 angle drill

They don't sell angle drills where you live? What do tradespeople do when they need to drill holes in tight quarters? Remember, if you buy one locally you will likely be able to get parts and service locally as well.
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Old 08-04-2016, 15:53   #27
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Re: Milwaukee 0721 angle drill

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They don't sell angle drills where you live? What do tradespeople do when they need to drill holes in tight quarters? Remember, if you buy one locally you will likely be able to get parts and service locally as well.
Yes but not as powerful. The best is this: M18 FRAD | Milwaukee Tools but it only has 95Nm torque rather than about 120Nm of the 0721. At about $450 in the UK without batteries or charger for the FRAD which has an 18V battery I don't want to take the risk of it being inadequate in both torque and time between charges.

Mike
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Old 08-04-2016, 16:09   #28
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Re: Milwaukee 0721 angle drill

I've been using one of them for years.......it's my best friend.
It is a bit heavy but it's just a matter of sitting it in your winch. The battery needs to be charged in a AC 110 volt charger. We always keep two charged batteries. One battery mounted in the drill and another in it's charger.
Our boat is 45' and we have no problems doing all sail adjustments. We also use it daily for roller furl main and Genoa as well as picking up our 12' caribe with a 15 hp Yamaha outboard.
I suggest that if you order one get the Milwaukee hard case as well.
BTW, no problem getting a good sized grown man up the mast either...
Enjoy.
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Old 08-04-2016, 16:46   #29
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Re: Milwaukee 0721 angle drill

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Originally Posted by captmikecoin View Post
In fact I would be using the drill most of the time as she is usually on the helm with me doing the heavier work. I do want her to be able to use it though just in case.

Thanks for the tips re: cover and 18V drills and thanks again to all for your recommendations. I'm reaching for my wallet!

Cheers,
Mike
Sorry Mike, this I knew I was just applying a bit of dry humour re your wife comment. However in this case she will find a way to use it no matter what as it will help her winch in, so much so the drill weight will not matter to her, as much as mastering her effort to manualy grind away a loaded sheet with a drill. believe me it will be a help. this way every winch you have on board can be electric when needed. Enjoy..
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Old 11-04-2016, 13:08   #30
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Re: Milwaukee 0721 angle drill

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Originally Posted by Moody46CC View Post
I have one but have loaned it to a friend. It is heavy, but once locked into the winch, the drill is supported by the winch. Your wife would just need to watch her balance when moving the machine to the winch and inserting it, but it locks in place. My Milwaukee (called a cinch winch) turns in both directions with the flip of a switch in the case. I think mine was 18V. The battery is detachable and it comes with a charger, which plugged into a 110V system. I have two batteries. Two batteries allowed me to raise my buddy to the masthead to change the light bulb, etc. One battery could get him to the top set of spreaders, the second batter to the masthead.

Good machine. Kept it in a little gym-bag like zippered container to keep spray out/off.
The battery only last long enough to get him halfway up the mast??
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