Cruisers Forum
 


Join CruisersForum Today

Reply
 
Thread Tools Rate Thread Display Modes
Old 27-05-2010, 17:59   #1
Registered User
 
boat_alexandra's Avatar

Join Date: Aug 2009
Location: Masachusetts
Boat: bristol 27
Posts: 2,803
Making Your Own Deadeyes

I want synthetic rigging, but dont want to pay much for all the deadeyes involved. What would be a good easily obtained material for deadeyes?

Would delrin work? I can get blocks of it, then cut with a jigsaw, drill holes, and file where needed.

It has a 18,000 psi compressive strength. What other materials would be good?

Does anyone have a decent design or drawing of a deadeye?
__________________

__________________
boat_alexandra is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 27-05-2010, 18:03   #2
Registered User
 
tager's Avatar

Join Date: Apr 2009
Location: Vashon, WA
Boat: Haida 26', 18' Sea Kayak, 15' kayak, 6.5' skiff, shorts
Posts: 837
Delrin is self lubricating. I thought about making these up as a business, but there just isn't a big enough market for synthetic standing rigging. I am pretty sure an oversize stainless thimble would get the job done as a deadeye, if not perfectly, at much less investment of time and money!
__________________

__________________
tager is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 27-05-2010, 18:27   #3
Registered User

Join Date: Nov 2008
Location: Tampa Bay
Boat: Nor Sea 27'
Posts: 202
Quote:
Originally Posted by tager View Post
I am pretty sure an oversize stainless thimble would get the job done as a deadeye, if not perfectly, at much less investment of time and money!
It depends on what is being used for the lanyard, but you're right, it's possible to get a good lashing around a big thimble.

Delrin should be fine for deadeyes. It's a failsafe system if the splice around the deadeye is performed properly anyway.
__________________
WIKIJAR
knothead is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 27-05-2010, 18:33   #4
Registered User

Join Date: Jan 2010
Location: Wells, Vt
Boat: 42ft Colvin Gazelle - TLA HLA
Posts: 504
Lignam Vitae seems to last for a few generations. Why use anything else?
They are still available from Dauphinee and sons in Lunenburg Nova Scotia I think if you don't want to make them yourself.

I have seen them made from aluminum which is close to galvinized steel (both zinc and low carbon steel) on the galvanic scale so corrossion sholdn't be a problem. I am asuming you are staying away from stainless shrouds for longevity of course. That stuf work hardens and has to be replaced relatively often and definately doesn't get along with aluminum.
__________________
ConradG is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 27-05-2010, 18:40   #5
Registered User

Join Date: Nov 2008
Location: Tampa Bay
Boat: Nor Sea 27'
Posts: 202
Quote:
Originally Posted by ConradG View Post
Lignam Vitae seems to last for a few generations. Why use anything else?
They are still available from Dauphinee and sons in Lunenburg Nova Scotia I think if you don't want to make them yourself.

I have seen them made from aluminum which is close to galvinized steel (both zinc and low carbon steel) on the galvanic scale so corrossion sholdn't be a problem. I am asuming you are staying away from stainless shrouds for longevity of course. That stuf work hardens and has to be replaced relatively often and definately doesn't get along with aluminum.

One of the advantages of synthetic rigging is in the weight savings. Plus lignum vitae would probably be pretty costly.




__________________
WIKIJAR
knothead is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 27-05-2010, 18:52   #6
Registered User

Join Date: Nov 2009
Location: Bellingham WA
Boat: 17' faering Ironblood, building 34' schooner Javelin
Posts: 305
A good set of directions for deadeyes may be found in Smith's The Marlinspike Sailor. Use a hardwood. Locust or lignum vitae or whatever you have available locally. Soak them in linseed oil for a few days, let them thoroughly dry and proceed. Easy to use and maintain. I made a set out of walnut. If you are setting up a traditional rig, why not go with traditional materials? Galvanized wire is easily obtainable, see Toss's book Rigger's Apprentice for easy to follow directions. I typically wrap the rigging in cloth electricians tape [NOT PLASTIC!!] and then serve with a serving mallet as he shows. I find tarred nylon net twine to serve the wire locally, black, of course. You stretch the wire between two trees or whatever - very tight, start the mallet going and then stand in one place jerking the wire up and down against the tension and the mallet will serve the whole thing. Magic, I tell you. And the technique is a couple of centuries old. I made my serving mallet so a whole spool of net twine will fit onto the roller. See the book and this makes sense. You can splice the wire around mast head and deadeye, but you can also fasten it with two round seizings. Three books for you: Brian Toss: Rigger's Apprentice, Emiliano Marino, Sailmaker's Apprentice, and HG Smith The Marlinspike Sailor. Indispensable and worth every nickel you spend.
__________________
MichaelC is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 27-05-2010, 19:00   #7
Registered User

Join Date: Nov 2008
Location: Tampa Bay
Boat: Nor Sea 27'
Posts: 202
Geckosenator posted that he wanted synthetic rigging not traditional rigging.
I would agree that wood would be more appropriate for traditional rigging.
__________________
WIKIJAR
knothead is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 28-05-2010, 23:05   #8
Registered User
 
boat_alexandra's Avatar

Join Date: Aug 2009
Location: Masachusetts
Boat: bristol 27
Posts: 2,803
Does anyone know what the minimum radius for a deadeye for dyneema would be?

Also, what kind of line should I use for the lanyards? I thought about using smaller dyneema, but 1/4" is already pretty small. Maybe 1/4" dacron would be better because it can hold knots and its distributed over 6 lines?
__________________
boat_alexandra is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 28-05-2010, 23:29   #9
Long Range Cruiser
 
MarkJ's Avatar

Cruisers Forum Supporter

Join Date: Dec 2007
Location: Australian living on "Sea Life" currently in England.
Boat: Beneteau 393 "Sea Life"
Posts: 12,828
Images: 25
Quote:
Originally Posted by geckosenator View Post
Does anyone know what the minimum radius for a deadeye for dyneema would be?

Sheeve diameters on rotating sheave blocks
Twisted Rope
= 10 times the rope diameter
Braided Rope = 8 times the rope diameter
The diameter on fixed pin termination should be at least 3 times the diameter i.e., the bending radius for 1/2" rope should be 1-1/2"
__________________
Notes on a Circumnavigation.
OurLifeAtSea.com

Somalia Pirates and our Convoy
MarkJ is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 29-05-2010, 16:08   #10
Registered User
 
tager's Avatar

Join Date: Apr 2009
Location: Vashon, WA
Boat: Haida 26', 18' Sea Kayak, 15' kayak, 6.5' skiff, shorts
Posts: 837
If you just go with thimbles of 10x the rope diameter, it may look silly, but it will be strong, and you will definitely be able to put a lashing on it without crowding your lanyard.
__________________
tager is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 29-05-2010, 16:26   #11
Registered User
 
boat_alexandra's Avatar

Join Date: Aug 2009
Location: Masachusetts
Boat: bristol 27
Posts: 2,803
Yeah, I was thinking just using all stainless thimbles, then use shackles to attach to chainplates?

The lanyard would need a bowline or different knot since it cant use a stopper through the hole. Any suggestions on how to rig with thimbles rather than deadeyes?
__________________
boat_alexandra is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 29-05-2010, 16:48   #12
Senior Cruiser
 
mikereed100's Avatar

Cruisers Forum Supporter

Join Date: Dec 2005
Location: Santa Barbara
Boat: 46' custom cat
Posts: 1,571
Images: 2
Hampidjan says for blocks the diameter should be 10x the rope size but you can go as low as 5x with some loss of strength and usefull life.
http://www.hampidjan.is/media/pdf/Dy...intainance.pdf

I use 6mm dyneema for my deadeyes on a 46' cat. The breaking strength is something ridiculous like 4 tons and there are 10 wraps. When added up the breaking strength is about 84,000 lbs. The 14mm wire and 7/8" pins the deadeyes are attached to have a breaking strength of about 30,000lbs.

I paid a bit over $60 apiece for aluminum deadeyes from Precourt. They would be cheaper for a boat your size.
Precourt Rigging - Designer and manufacturer of innovative sailboat rigging systems - Internationally recognized for our synthetic rigging systems
Chainplate Distributors | Colligo Synthetic Systems | Colligo Marine

I would think that Delrin would be fine, especially as it is UV resistant. I wonder if there is a reason why the above riggers chose aluminum over Delrin? Might be worth a jingle. Both Dave at Colligo and Eric at Precourt are nice, helpfull folks who enjoy talking about synthetic rigging.

If you use thimbles, attach the Dyneema with a Brummel splice, keeping in mind that the radius will not be optimal. SK 75 does not like tight bends and Dux likes it even less. Instructions are on the Colligo website.


Mike
__________________
mikereed100 is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 29-05-2010, 17:46   #13
Writing Full-Time Since 2014
 
thinwater's Avatar

Join Date: Nov 2008
Location: Deale, MD
Boat: PDQ Altair, 32/34
Posts: 4,332
It strikes me that the synthetic is going to be far stronger than the Delrin, so there may be no purpose in going fancier than polyester. If I were going that way, I would check the math. It's sort of weakest link thing; I commonly see high tech line used in lashings, folks worrying over its knot holding ability, when it is far too strong for the application anyway.
__________________
Gear Testing--Engineering--Sailing

Writing full-time since 2014.
Bookstore:http://sail-delmarva.blogspot.com/20...ook-store.html
thinwater is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 30-05-2010, 22:54   #14
Registered User
 
tager's Avatar

Join Date: Apr 2009
Location: Vashon, WA
Boat: Haida 26', 18' Sea Kayak, 15' kayak, 6.5' skiff, shorts
Posts: 837
The lashings don't need to be dynex dux, or even dynex. Thinwater has it right. The lashings will be way stronger with less creep than the stay. As long as you get a line that tolerates the small radius, you should be fine. As to the lower termination I am not sure what would be best. It seems that some thick aluminum or stainless tubing or rod would work. That shouldn't be too difficult to keep captive. Maybe even build it into the chainplate.
__________________
tager is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 22-11-2010, 12:15   #15
Registered User

Join Date: Nov 2010
Posts: 1
I have used the synthetic decking material,trade name TREX. Turns easily on a lathe and has good compressive strength.Unaffected by water etc.
__________________

__________________
baranof is offline   Reply With Quote
Reply

Thread Tools
Display Modes Rate This Thread
Rate This Thread:

Posting Rules
You may not post new threads
You may not post replies
You may not post attachments
You may not edit your posts

BB code is On
Smilies are On
[IMG] code is On
HTML code is Off
Trackbacks are Off
Pingbacks are Off
Refbacks are Off


Similar Threads
Thread Thread Starter Forum Replies Last Post
Making Your Own Cradle k8ekotzel Monohull Sailboats 9 17-12-2011 11:30
Making Ice Arizona Provisioning: Food & Drink 38 16-09-2009 20:36
Making a Post geraldbasford Forum Tech Support & Site Help 12 13-09-2009 08:17
33 Years in the Making knottybuoyz Construction, Maintenance & Refit 0 01-06-2009 06:58
Making a mainsail from a kit Strygaldwir Construction, Maintenance & Refit 9 22-07-2005 20:21



Copyright 2002- Social Knowledge, LLC All Rights Reserved.

All times are GMT -7. The time now is 10:50.


Google+
Powered by vBulletin® Version 3.8.8 Beta 1
Copyright ©2000 - 2017, vBulletin Solutions, Inc.
Social Knowledge Networks
Powered by vBulletin® Version 3.8.8 Beta 1
Copyright ©2000 - 2017, vBulletin Solutions, Inc.

ShowCase vBulletin Plugins by Drive Thru Online, Inc.