Cruisers Forum
 


Join CruisersForum Today

Reply
 
Thread Tools Rate Thread Display Modes
Old 11-02-2016, 10:36   #1
Registered User
 
TheOffice's Avatar

Join Date: Jun 2012
Location: Annapolis
Boat: Hylas 44
Posts: 528
How do I add a spin halyard to a Hylas 44?

Looking to add a spin halyard. There is no open sheave, but the mast has a track and spin pole ring, as well as an exit for another halyard.

Has anyone added a spin halyard?

Thanks
__________________

__________________
TheOffice is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 11-02-2016, 20:09   #2
Registered User

Join Date: Mar 2011
Location: Southport CT
Boat: J/36
Posts: 377
Re: How do I add a spin halyard to a Hylas 44?

Could the "halyard exit" you mention be for the spinnaker pole topping lift? Since you say there's no sheave at the masthead that might make sense. On a cruiser like a Hylas, I would attach a single swiveling halyard block at the top of the mast. Get it sized appropriately! If there's no obvious place to attach it up there, I would perhaps weld a short crane arm to the top of the mast and slap the block on that. Are you planning to use mast-mounted winches & cleats for the halyard ends (both P & S ) or are there turning blocks at the partners and winches, stoppers and cleats on the cabintop?
__________________

__________________
psk125 is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 12-02-2016, 06:07   #3
Registered User
 
TheOffice's Avatar

Join Date: Jun 2012
Location: Annapolis
Boat: Hylas 44
Posts: 528
Re: How do I add a spin halyard to a Hylas 44?

There is a separate exit (labeled) for the topping lift. All the halyards are at the mast and there are no turning blocks. I'll probably add a clutch on the mast.
Thanks.
__________________
TheOffice is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 12-02-2016, 06:17   #4
Registered User
 
captjcook's Avatar

Join Date: Jul 2008
Location: Fort Lauderdale Florida
Boat: Northstar 1500, 35'
Posts: 318
How do I add a spin halyard to a Hylas 44?

I agree with psk125 , however not necessarily about the welding...
I would be a "no" vote for internal spinnaker halyard, I want to get it up and down fast...even though I have an ATN.


Sent from my iPad using Cruisers Sailing Forum
__________________
captjcook is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 12-02-2016, 09:08   #5
Registered User

Join Date: Nov 2015
Location: Brockville On
Boat: Alberg 34
Posts: 31
Re: How do I add a spin halyard to a Hylas 44?

Run a separate halyard . Attach a horse shoe ( bolt on ) on top of the mast ,can be bought or fabricated . Use a good quality swivel block. Have long enough halyards to go around the forward stay so you can use on either tack. Or run two halyards
Running a spin/ asymmetric on an in mast sheave will wear the halyard quite quickly
__________________
Regards Eric
You don't ask You don't get
Alberg 34 is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 12-02-2016, 10:18   #6
Registered User
 
UNCIVILIZED's Avatar

Join Date: Jun 2014
Location: Up the mast, looking for clean wind.
Boat: Currently Shopping, & Heavily in LUST!
Posts: 5,629
Re: How do I add a spin halyard to a Hylas 44?

To put in a kite halyard, you can go internal, or external. My vote's for the former. Less windage, noise, wear on the halyard, & things to get tangled.

You put a masthead crane on, with an attached U-bolt, to hang the block for the halyard from. In addition to machining an exit slot for the halyard, near the masthead, on whichever side you're going to mount it. And then mount a cheek block, near the exit slot up at the top of the mast.

The halyard then runs from; your winch on the mast, through the lower exit plate in the mast wall, up through the inside of the spar tube. Exiting @ the top slot, & then using the cheek block as a fairlead in order to lead it to the block on the masthead crane.

I can't upload a pic right at the moment, but it's less complex than it sounds. And you get the perks of an intenal halyard, with the bits that commonly need inspecting, being right out in the open.

I'd suggest that you just run the new halyard off of a dedicated self-tailing winch, with a horn cleat on the spar (or deck) to back it up. Because if you're sailing with a kite shorthanded, & are using a clutch, there can be difficulties.
Like the clutch accidentally getting closed during a takedown, & the chute then re-filling while at half hoist.
Such occurrences tend to cause the boat to lean over REAL far, at rather inconvenient moments.

If you've got a 2nd person onboard, who's only job during a takedown is to handle the halyard, then clutches are okay. But if not, you need to be certain that everyone onboard is up for dealing with a cranky spinnaker. Whether you're running a snuffer or no.

Also, with a mast mounted winch, it's easy for someone to keep a couple of wraps on the winch, & control things during a drop or hoist that way.
As the extra friction afforded by the winch makes handling the kite a lot safer.

Plus, it lets one person fully handle a drop or hoist by themselves. As you simply keep a couple of wraps of the halyard on the winch, & walk forward while holding it, & gather up the kite (with or without sock) as you go.

Or, crew member #2 can handle the halyard in the same fashion, while standing at the mast. While you deal with handling the kite itself.
__________________

The Uncommon Thing, The Hard Thing, The Important Thing (in Life): Making Promises to Yourself, And Keeping Them.
UNCIVILIZED is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 12-02-2016, 12:32   #7
Registered User

Join Date: Mar 2011
Location: fl- various marinas
Boat: morgan O/I 33' sloop
Posts: 1,100
Re: How do I add a spin halyard to a Hylas 44?

Your spinnaker halyard needs to be above and clear of your jib halyard. That will dictate the position and length of the crane you will need assuming you need one at all. Internal location is nice to have but much more trouble to install. You may need to rig a fair-lead or a bail to prevent halyard wrap. Even if you have a roller reefing jib I see no reason to not use the jib winch for the kite.
Seems strange to have hardware for the pole and not the halyard. If you have a large genoa the topping lift and attachment ring might be for running wing and wing.
__________________
Dave22q is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 12-02-2016, 14:30   #8
Registered User

Join Date: Feb 2014
Location: Pickering ON CAN
Boat: ODay 322
Posts: 25
Re: How do I add a spin halyard to a Hylas 44?

If you search the mast maker , you will find the fittings to purchase or you can make your own. My mast crane was 140.00 and I made one for 6.00.
__________________
naitaka322 is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 12-02-2016, 14:34   #9
Registered User

Join Date: Oct 2007
Location: Charleston, SC
Boat: Stevens 47
Posts: 80
Re: How do I add a spin halyard to a Hylas 44?

I have a Stevens 47 from the same yard. Your Hylas almost certainly already has a crane on the mast head with a u bolt installed. The slot in the mast for the internal spin halyard should be on the front of the mast a couple of feet directly below the crane. There will be an exit slot for the halyard about ten feet up from the deck on the port side of the mast toward the front.

I have a mast mounted winch for it above the main halyard winch and slightly forward of the main halyard winch.

I, too, recommend against a clutch having had a son halyard jam during a take down. Boy, that was not fun. I had to throw those undies away.

To reeve the halyard, tie a heavy fishing weight to a feeder line (good stout yellow nylon) and take it up to the top of the mast. Leave the un weighted end of the feeder on deck and tie it to something. The line will have to be twice the height of your mast plus 10 feet or so. Run the weighted end of your feeder through the spin halyard block and then drop it through the slot in the mast. Feed it down to the bottom of the mast and listen for the weight banging around a bit below the exit slot. Using a straightened coat hanger wire with a u hook bent on one end, fish around in the mast through the exit slot until you hook the line. Pull it through the slot.

Now tie the new halyard to the weighted end of the feeder (cut the weight off first) and pull the halyard up the mast through the block and down on deck. Don't untie the feeder from the deck until you have both ends of the halyard in your hands. Don't forget to tie the lower end of the halyard to the mast before you hoist it up through the mast.

For the halyard block, get a stout harken big boat swivel block suitable for at least half inch. A spin halyard block is not the place to skimp. Don't forget to safety wire the shackle pin.

Have fun!
__________________
sainted is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 12-02-2016, 14:52   #10
Registered User
 
TheOffice's Avatar

Join Date: Jun 2012
Location: Annapolis
Boat: Hylas 44
Posts: 528
Re: How do I add a spin halyard to a Hylas 44?

Here is a shot of the masthead. (best I have) You can see the 2 jib halyards and forestay. Looks like a U bolt to starboard and in another shot I can see holes for another to port. I'd like to have an internal, but I'm not seeing room.
Attached Thumbnails
Click image for larger version

Name:	P1290665.jpg
Views:	173
Size:	335.7 KB
ID:	118826  
__________________
TheOffice is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 12-02-2016, 17:39   #11
Registered User

Join Date: Oct 2007
Location: Charleston, SC
Boat: Stevens 47
Posts: 80
Re: How do I add a spin halyard to a Hylas 44?

Ok, the crane is the hard part. If the mast already has a crane and internal halyards, then it likely has the entrance and exit slot necessary for an internal spin halyard. Look down a couple of feet from the masthead for the entrance slot and up from the deck about 8 feet for the exit slot. Then just reeve a halyard as I outlined in my previous post.
__________________
sainted is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 12-02-2016, 23:30   #12
Registered User
 
UNCIVILIZED's Avatar

Join Date: Jun 2014
Location: Up the mast, looking for clean wind.
Boat: Currently Shopping, & Heavily in LUST!
Posts: 5,629
Re: How do I add a spin halyard to a Hylas 44?

So… Back to spinnaker halyards. Below is a sketch of how to add the type of halyard which I described. Though what style you go with is up to you. But with a little time up at the masthead, with a piece of string, you’ll get a better idea of what’ll work, & what won’t.
Or rather, the difficulty & expense of each style choice. And having a chat with a rigger will help too. As might going online, & seeing if there’s a Hylas forum, or just some other Hylas owners who’ve added kite halyards. That, & one other source would be to find out who built your spar, especially the masthead. So that you can talk to the experts to find out what your best options are.




Regarding pictures of masthead hardware & designs. The one attached by the OP surely helps. And I always take a camera along when I go aloft. And I take dozens of shots from as many angles & perspectives as I can reach, even if I can’t see exactly what I’m aiming the camera at, when I’m snapping them off.


As with said method, you’ll get enough decent shots, so that you have full knowledge of the design & configuration of the masthead. Including shroud & stay tangs, halyard sheave configurations… pretty much “The Full Monty”.
Which REALLY helps, when you’re back down on deck/terra firma, to analyze things & make decisions.

Okay, so regardless of what masthead hardware configuration you go with. When you’re adding things like halyards, & topping lifts, it’s a good time to both; properly Color Code things, & put your rig on a diet.
~ The first bit’s about choosing colors for your new halyards & control lines, so that they (hopefully) conform to the “standard” colors for the specific control lines. As, generally speaking, halyards & the like, have standardized colors. Much like, say, the Main Halyard is always on the Starboard side on (99%) of all boats.
So that when someone new steps onboard, they instantly know which line does what.

Main Halyard – White (or Other)
Jib Halyard – White (or Other)
Port Spinnaker – Red
Starboard Spinnaker – Green
Topping Lift – Blue
Solent/Staysail – Other (I’m a fan of Yellow, or Orange. But; Grey, Black, or even Lime Green work)

Also, keep in mind where you’ll be sailing, & that Spectra/Dyneema isn’t the biggest fan of heat, so choose your jacket colors accordingly with this in mind. Black being the primary/worst offender here.
Unless you go with another halyard material. Such as Vectran cored, or something with a blended core, like T900; which is cored with Spectra & Technora.

One other consideration/option, is that of putting your rig on a slight diet. As if you go with halyards which get the majority of their strength from their cores, then you can save a good bit of weight aloft, by stripping off some of their cover.

I know, it sounds like a racer’s thing, & that it won’t make much difference. But if you strip the cover off of 40% of 4 of the 6 lines which you have aloft. Then it’s not difficult to pull 15 -25lbs out of your total rig weight, as compared to using standard, dacron double-braid halyards.
And that’s when things are dry. Once the rain starts to fall, & things get soaked, then your weight savings just tripled (or more). As Spectra/Dyneema doesn’t absorb any water, whereas Dacron (Terylene) is a sponge.

Doing this, is like adding 150lbs to your keel, or having an extra crew hiking out on the weather rail all of the time. And it’s a practically free “upgrade”.

Also, when you’re assembling your halyard;
~ Luggage Tag Splices work well for shackles. Albeit some folks will do a minor bit of lock stitching, to ensure that the shackle stays put. That, & add a coat or two of Maxi jacket to the line in that area.
~ And Reeving Splices, on the tail ends of halyards, work wonders when you’re installing them, or moving them around.

One last trick. If you’re contemplating racing at all, some guys like to cross their Spinnaker halyards, inside of the mast. So that the Port Halyard comes out of the Starboard side of the mast, down at deck level. So that the guy hauling on it to hoist things, is doing so from the weather side of the boat. And vice versa.

PS: A length of bicycle chain on the end of your leader line when reeving a halyard, makes for a handy weight.
Also, were it me; at a minimum, I'd pull out that U-bolt, polish it up, & then dye penetrant test it. That, or plain old, just replace it. As they're notorious for being subject to a LOT o metal fatigue, & work hardening over time. Followed by their subsequent failure.
__________________

__________________

The Uncommon Thing, The Hard Thing, The Important Thing (in Life): Making Promises to Yourself, And Keeping Them.
UNCIVILIZED is offline   Reply With Quote
Reply

Tags
halyard, Hylas

Thread Tools
Display Modes Rate This Thread
Rate This Thread:

Posting Rules
You may not post new threads
You may not post replies
You may not post attachments
You may not edit your posts

BB code is On
Smilies are On
[IMG] code is On
HTML code is Off
Trackbacks are Off
Pingbacks are Off
Refbacks are Off


Similar Threads
Thread Thread Starter Forum Replies Last Post
Main halyard stbd, jib halyard port??"? skipmac Deck hardware: Rigging, Sails & Hoisting 39 30-10-2017 18:47
New used sailboat. 3 sail lines main sail halyard, jib halyard and ??? Mrdouble Monohull Sailboats 10 21-09-2015 14:01
How to add second head sail halyard to small boat Boulter Deck hardware: Rigging, Sails & Hoisting 5 02-06-2014 13:33
SPIN TEC Roller Furling System kevball Deck hardware: Rigging, Sails & Hoisting 4 08-09-2008 23:37
Shipping Whisker/Spin poles Greg S Classifieds Archive 9 23-09-2007 19:17



Copyright 2002- Social Knowledge, LLC All Rights Reserved.

All times are GMT -7. The time now is 22:25.


Google+
Powered by vBulletin® Version 3.8.8 Beta 1
Copyright ©2000 - 2017, vBulletin Solutions, Inc.
Social Knowledge Networks
Powered by vBulletin® Version 3.8.8 Beta 1
Copyright ©2000 - 2017, vBulletin Solutions, Inc.

ShowCase vBulletin Plugins by Drive Thru Online, Inc.