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Old 05-08-2008, 05:42   #16
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I think forsailbyowner was referring to pole line Guy Wires (not ACSR conductors); which are roughly analogous to shrouds & stays.
The wire, normally used in a down guy, is seven-stranded galvanized steel wire, or seven-stranded alumoweld wire. Alumoweld wire consists of steel wire strands coated with a layer of aluminum to prevent corrosion.

Still not a convincing (IMHO) argument for galv. rigging on a sailboat.
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Old 05-08-2008, 05:57   #17
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I think you're right, Gord. Thanks.
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Old 05-08-2008, 07:14   #18
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My reasoning is, if you have exposed wire running around a thimble you can do a visual inspection of the entire wire. The problem with swaged and mechanical fittings is the problems are often inside the fitting or swage. Invisible to the eye the saltwater is sitting inside the fitting with no oxygen (we all know how stainless suffers from corrosion if not exposed to oxygen) corroding away invisible to the naked eye. Then you have a catastrophic failure like a backstay zinging by your ear from a stay that looked solid to the visual inspection. Look at the specs for galvanized guy wire compared to the stainless. Size for size the galvanized steel is rated higher. I havent made the jump yet to galvanized but fully plan on it before I graduate from coastal cruising to offshore passagemaking. Incidentally for treating my stainless fittings, Ive been experimenting with using lanacote instead of 5200 to treat the fittings. As well as bedding the inside of the mechanical fitting I heavily coat the turnbuckle and the fitting and cable 2 inches up from the fitting. Then wrap a canvas boot around the whole works. The last time I checked after 4 months of cruising in salt the turnbuckles and cable ends looked great . After I dissambled the fittings I rinsed them in mineral spirits , recoated and reassembled. If you can get over the barnyard smell the lanacote gives when first applied its by far the best protectant available for saltwater exposed metal.
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Old 05-08-2008, 08:30   #19
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Given that a Newport 30 in any condition is worth anywhere from $16,000 to $26,000, it would seem that spending $1,800 on new rigging would not be unreasonable. If you are handy, temporarily support the mast with halyards, remove the back stay and one each of you uppers and lowers and measure the pin to pin length on the headstay and send them and your measurements off to SECOSOUTH, INC. Manufactures of stainless steel cable handle rail systems or JSI - Marine Rigging & Architectural Rigging Systems for duplication. If you are not handy, a rigger can do the mast work for you in very little time. Given the age of the yacht, I would also suggest you carefully examine the tangs and the chain-plates while the tension is off the rig. SoCal boats of that era have a tendency to develop crevice corrosion in the chain-plates, just below the deck level, and having one snap off is not a fun thing (been there, done that, got the T-shirt). Replacement chain-plates are not costly, typically about $60 each on that boat at New JSI.

The Newport 30 is a great boat and worth caring for properly.

FWIW...

s/v HyLyte
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Old 05-08-2008, 20:44   #20
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Originally Posted by svHyLyte View Post
Given the age of the yacht, I would also suggest you carefully examine the tangs and the chain-plates while the tension is off the rig. SoCal boats of that era have a tendency to develop crevice corrosion in the chain-plates, just below the deck level, and having one snap off is not a fun thing (been there, done that, got the T-shirt). Replacement chain-plates are not costly, typically about $60 each on that boat at New JSI.

The Newport 30 is a great boat and worth caring for properly.
I got my t-shirt too. Between the deck chainplate and the hull fitting is a carry-through rod from the underside of the deck fitting to a fitting in a chine on the hull. Very strong when all the bits are in one piece.

Our boat had a dismasting 7 years ago due to a failed chain plate.

After we bought it one of the underdeck fittings failed. We replaced it. Then during a sail a starboard chain plate failed and we were lucky not to lose the mast.

I then replaced all the deck fittings and chain plates including the backstay fittings and had all the bits manufactured "one size" bigger.

The previous owner spent over $15,000 for a new mast and sails when the dismasting happened. The $1,500 I spent is cheap insurance every 7 years.
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Old 05-08-2008, 21:15   #21
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I have learned more about standing rigging over the past three days--thanks a bunch to this thread. There is a local rigger here that will undress the mast and send off for reproduced rigging. I really appreciate the feedback, and I have to tell you that it was stories about demasting from the forum and others that prepared me to turn into the wind, fire the diesel, and douse the sails immediately. I know that saved me plenty of trouble; I'm thankful for you all~
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