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Old 02-04-2010, 11:36   #16
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Multi-hull is good. That's what I have now. Without the stick!
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Old 02-04-2010, 13:13   #17
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I have been up several masts on the hard and see nothing wrong with it provided that the boat is properly supported (that is kind of a requirement for anything like working on the bottom too). It definitely is a bit different to go aloft on a boat with ratlines where you are not clipped in since you don't want to kick outwards if you start to slip. On deep draft vessels, you are noticeably higher as well, it was weird the first time I went aloft on a boat that draws 11.5' and was sitting on 3' of blocking.
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Old 02-04-2010, 15:40   #18
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I work in a boatyard and do it all the time. Calm days, great view, no problem.
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Old 02-04-2010, 16:26   #19
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I have a catamaran - tipping on the hard is a non-issue.

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I work in a boatyard and do it all the time. Calm days, great view, no problem.
I was merely reporting the policy of the yards I have used. For my part, the boat would move a lot less; no mystery wake at a delicate moment.

I also agree with the posters that explained that the wind loads are FAR greater than any climber induced moment, unless the climber is 10-20 feet out of column....

but I have seen poorly blocked boats fall over too!
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Old 03-04-2010, 06:05   #20
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Is it safe to go up the mast when the boat is out of the water? I see different opinions on the web on this topic. Do you exert a lot more torque if you're swinging around at the top of the mast rather than walking around on deck, so much so that the boat could fall over?
The boat can fall over in a strong enough wind even without you wiggling about at the top of the mast.

Mine fell over some time in the distant past. Lots of other boats did too throughout the marinas in the area. Insurance companies were very busy.

In my case one of the lee metal supports of the craddle bent out of shape and the boat settled downwards. Fortunately the top of the mast came to rest against the antenna of the next door schooner. The boat ended up resting on the end of the keel and the top of the mast at an angle of about 60 degrees. That was a good test of my stays.

Only damage was that the genoa roller reefing profile bent out of shape. I straightened that out although everyone was telling me it was impossible. But that's another story...

What I do now, if there is something to be done up at the top, while on the hard, is either take the mast down (for extended work) or go up in a cage hoisted by the marina crane for a quicky. I am also willing to hoist someone else up my mast. Any volunteers?

I play it safe.
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Old 03-04-2010, 08:00   #21
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I am SO biting my tongue on this thread title....
Exactly my reaction. Since going up the mast as suggested is the very last thing I would contemplate, this thread isn't one of direct interest to me - EXCEPT, I am reading it to find the humorous posts that the title seems destined to draw.


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Old 04-04-2010, 16:47   #22
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After reading a few posts, I have a question. What is mast "pumping"? A few guys mention that their mast will pump. This is not something that I have experienced. Any requests appreciated.
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Old 04-04-2010, 17:04   #23
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After reading a few posts, I have a question. What is mast "pumping"? A few guys mention that their mast will pump. This is not something that I have experienced. Any requests appreciated.
Spencer
It's a harmonic vibration/motion. The mast will start to whip in the wind like a musical instrument string except it's compressed instead of stretched..
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Old 04-04-2010, 17:49   #24
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It's a harmonic vibration/motion. The mast will start to whip in the wind like a musical instrument string except it's compressed instead of stretched..
Happens to us occasionally about F4 normally with no sails up. Wind has to be at a particular angle too, lasts for maybe 10 seconds then stops as the wind strength or angle changes etc. Believe it is something to do with the shape and slot effect in the mast as the cure is to hoist something to break the air flow around the mast, except we never bother. First few times is sounds really bad, then you realise the mast has been standing for 20 years so don't worry.

Hasn't happened at sea because the main alters the wind flow.

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Old 04-04-2010, 19:27   #25
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Ether Vibrations

The morning we left to install a radar reflector on the mast with the boat on the cradle this thread popped up!!! The thought had already rolled around in my head with regards to the question. I suspect I disturbed the ether enough with these thoughts to cause this thread to appear in CF at just the right moment.

My thoughts are summerized below.

From an engineering point of view there is little to no risk on a no wind day. The roll-over moment is a function of how far you can move from the centerline of the boat to either side of the mast. Although your weight is a sizable force on a long lever arm (the mast) you need to exert this force on the mast so that you pull toward either the port or star'b side in order to to create a torque that could roll the boat on the stands or in the cradle. Most guys going up a long mast have enough intuition not to start swinging from side-to-side. It's kind of a self preservation thing.
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Old 04-04-2010, 19:53   #26
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Thanks Del,
That is what I thought. I have heard of mast humming, but was not certain of pumping. Thanks,
Spencer
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Old 04-04-2010, 20:18   #27
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Just to add, pumping can occur with or without the sails aloft.
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Old 04-04-2010, 21:24   #28
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It seems to me that there are other factors which are going to affect the risk of going aloft more than a general statement of it being on the hard or in the water.

Is the person controlling the halyard you are tied into reliable and capable?
What about the pulley at the top?
How did you tie in?
What local factors come into play? (wind, communication, boat wakes, roll, etc)

My hunter is now on the hard. It has a central cradle, 4 jack stands, as well as bow and stern blocking. The boat tipping over in fair weather due to my weight hanging from the mast is about the lowest risk associated with sailing I can think of.

It doesn't mean I wouldn't be nervous!
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Old 04-04-2010, 21:37   #29
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The yard I use does not allow it. Wanted to change to an LED anchor light when I last hauled, and they said they'd either have to pull the mast or send a guy up on a crane.
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Old 05-04-2010, 02:25   #30
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Humming

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Thanks Del,
That is what I thought. I have heard of mast humming, but was not certain of pumping. Thanks,
Spencer
Hi Scook1,

Apart from mast humming have you ever heard of boom booming?
It can happen.

cheers
Aris
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