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Old 15-09-2010, 08:42   #16
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Hi all: for a low tech solution try linseed oil ,it worked well for me many years as lifelines with never a trace of rust,just wipe it on with a rag every few years and let it oxidize.
Not so sure about the stretch factor,but for the gaff rig mentioned where supper taut stays are less important ,I'd bet it would outlast ss in the marine environment.
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Old 15-09-2010, 09:11   #17
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After all of the corroded galvanized bolts I've pulled from old boats, I wouldn't rig in galvanized wire but that's me...
Galvanized steel tends to do very well out in the open. I suspect the corroded bolts you're talking about were passing through wood or mixed metals... galvanized doesn't fare quite as well in closed, anaerobic environments such as a bolt passing through a hull or keel.
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Old 16-09-2010, 09:21   #18
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Yep, mostly framing joints like ribs and floors.
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Old 16-09-2010, 09:47   #19
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The Norselay option sounds interesting (very). Does anybody have any info on pricing (is the outfit in the UK the sole supplier)? And can we go back to a discussion of choice of turnbuckle material (galvanized versus bronze vs stainless) if one is "stuck" with stainless chainplates. Seeing some new options here that I hadn't thought about before and want to think this through. Thanks.
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Old 17-09-2010, 08:51   #20
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I appreciate all of the answers that I have received here. Lots to think about.
For me, the synthetic rigging is not going to be considered. Although I may use Spectra for lifelines. I am not too much into the high tech stuff.
For me it will be a choice between galvanized or stainless wire. Just my personal preference.
I did find one person who had rigged their boat with Norselay and they were not too happy with it in the end it sounds like
".........The Stainless steel would not be bothered by tropical sun at all, and it would be strong, so we went with it because we know all about it. Stainless is not perfect either and not lovely. I preferred the look of the Norselay which we had, but that stuff was breaking, so is totally unacceptable to us. Never again Norselay. It certainly is a hard decision."
I don't know the whole story behind the problem they had with the Norselay, but I think I will stay with the well tested materials.
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Old 17-09-2010, 17:29   #21
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Maybe the "Norse" in Norselay has to do with using it only in very high latitudes like near the north/south pole. Anywhere close to the Equator the UV will eat away that protective plastic covering in no time flat. Then you will have exposed galvanized steel which will rust.
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Old 17-09-2010, 17:44   #22
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Our gal rigging is 25 yrs old. Initially soaked in fishoil and then painted with a half and half mixture of fishoil and silver paint every few years. The gal rigging screws are parcelled in Denso tape, with silver gaffer tape over that.
One sixth the cost of stainless and many times the life.
Regards, Richard.
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Old 18-09-2010, 01:30   #23
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Good quality Galvanised wire has the same strength size for size as SS, one of the ways to proof it is to soak it in boiled linseed oil, this will leave it with a reasonably tough skin over the wire. There used to be discussions as to whether rope cored wire was better than wire cored, as the rope had a wicking effect. Generally the wires were retreated every 1 to 2 years and can be done one at a time so as not to have to take the rig down to do it. I have seen quality 30 year old galvanised rigging still doing its job without any treatment, this was on a world cruiser, it probably still has the same wire though I lost touch with it 10 years ago. SS is more about esthetics than strength.
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Old 24-09-2010, 23:08   #24
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Norselay riging

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Originally Posted by clausont View Post
Interesting thread realizing that it is an older thread. I am replacing the bowsprit on our Ingrid which will require replacing the headstay and bobstay as the original bowsprit is nearly 2' short of the drawings for the cutter rig.
Regarding Norselay, what is the cost compared to stainless 1 x 19, especially when the fittings are considered? Can Norselay be used with a roller furler?
If I were to go with a galv headstay, can that be used with a roller furler or would that not be feasible considering there would be no way to maintain the stay without removing the furler annually?
What else should I be considering here that I am not thinking of?
These questions have probably all been answered already so if there is another thread that answers them, please redirect me.

Hi Clausont
The polyurethane impregnated in to, and coating , the lays of the 7x7 wire in the Norselay rigging will NOT withstand side loads or the wear associated with roller furling. As a result I installed terminals at the ends of the wire where it was redirected at the ends of the spreaders, and I used Dieform stainless for the twin headstays.
Regardind the cost in 2004, at that time Norselay was half the cost of equivalent stainless, and the sockets I had custom made in New Zealand from AB2 Bronze were less than a quarter of the price of a Norseman or equivalent socket. A socket for a 13mm wire was $25NZ, but that was before the the price of copper went through the roof!
I would think that to place a roller furling mechanism over a galvanized wire would wear off the zinc coating with immediate rusting and the mess it would cause.Not a good idea.
The Spelter socket system is the best wire terminal available but it is not as quick as a swaged terminal and most riggers dont want to mess with it or know anything about them. It was difficult to find good information on this outdated technology but when I finally figured it out I was pleased with the results.
The down side of all this is:
(1) The Norselay wire is heavier because of the coating, and there is more windage aloft.
(2) If you use the resin to fill the Spelter sockets it has a limited shelf life; if you want to persue this approach let me know and I will be happy to pass on what I know regarding the process. (There may be a delay in my response since my internet connection is haphazard at best in my location approaching Indonesia)
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Old 24-09-2010, 23:25   #25
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Norselay

Quote:
Originally Posted by Anomaly View Post
The Norselay option sounds interesting (very). Does anybody have any info on pricing (is the outfit in the UK the sole supplier)? And can we go back to a discussion of choice of turnbuckle material (galvanized versus bronze vs stainless) if one is "stuck" with stainless chainplates. Seeing some new options here that I hadn't thought about before and want to think this through. Thanks.
Hi Anomaly
As far as I know there was no other product quite the same as Norselay when I got some in 2004. At that time it was half the price of SS, I think the 13mm wire was about $11 NZ per meter when SS was $22.
Regarding turnbuckles I am sold on AB2 Aluminium Bronze. I had SS turnbuckles with bronze screws and they cost $600(US) each, and the bodies were cracked. I replaced them with custom made bronze turnbuckels for $250 (NZ)each and the next size up, and six years later there is no corrosion and thet look as good as new!
Regards
Lawrence
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Old 25-09-2010, 07:10   #26
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Lawrence View Post
Hi Clausont
The polyurethane impregnated in to, and coating , the lays of the 7x7 wire in the Norselay rigging will NOT withstand side loads or the wear associated with roller furling. As a result I installed terminals at the ends of the wire where it was redirected at the ends of the spreaders, and I used Dieform stainless for the twin headstays.
Regardind the cost in 2004, at that time Norselay was half the cost of equivalent stainless, and the sockets I had custom made in New Zealand from AB2 Bronze were less than a quarter of the price of a Norseman or equivalent socket. A socket for a 13mm wire was $25NZ, but that was before the the price of copper went through the roof!
I would think that to place a roller furling mechanism over a galvanized wire would wear off the zinc coating with immediate rusting and the mess it would cause.Not a good idea.
The Spelter socket system is the best wire terminal available but it is not as quick as a swaged terminal and most riggers dont want to mess with it or know anything about them. It was difficult to find good information on this outdated technology but when I finally figured it out I was pleased with the results.
The down side of all this is:
(1) The Norselay wire is heavier because of the coating, and there is more windage aloft.
(2) If you use the resin to fill the Spelter sockets it has a limited shelf life; if you want to persue this approach let me know and I will be happy to pass on what I know regarding the process. (There may be a delay in my response since my internet connection is haphazard at best in my location approaching Indonesia)
Hi Lawrence,

This has pretty much confirmed my thoughts on both Galvanized wire and Norselay. I was pretty sure galv would not be good for roller furling but not sure on the Norselay.
I would like to hear more about the Spelter socket system. I have never even heard of this so I would like to learn more.
Thanks
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Old 26-09-2010, 00:14   #27
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I may be looking at replacing the standing rigging on my boat next year. It is in refit and the masts are down to be repaired and refinished. The stainless rigging is in storage, looks good, but is the original from 1972. Galvanized seems to be the way to go for me according to what I've read on this thread. What seems to be the best (cheapest) domestic source. Not much has been said about fittings for the galvanized rigging though. Are the same fittings that are used with stainless used or are there also galvanized fittings suitable for marine use. Any problem fastening it to stainless chain plates? Also, I'm curious about the fish oil mixed with paint treatment. I have this picture of me wringing out a fish over a bucket. Where do you get fish oil?
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Old 26-09-2010, 06:27   #28
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I may be looking at replacing the standing rigging on my boat next year. It is in refit and the masts are down to be repaired and refinished. The stainless rigging is in storage, looks good, but is the original from 1972. Galvanized seems to be the way to go for me according to what I've read on this thread. What seems to be the best (cheapest) domestic source. Not much has been said about fittings for the galvanized rigging though. Are the same fittings that are used with stainless used or are there also galvanized fittings suitable for marine use. Any problem fastening it to stainless chain plates? Also, I'm curious about the fish oil mixed with paint treatment. I have this picture of me wringing out a fish over a bucket. Where do you get fish oil?
If you have the old original version that was all wood, then fine with the galvanized standing rigging - but - it you have the FRG version you might want to reconsider switching to galvanized - if - you plan on selling the boat in the future. Since it is not what the boat came with, any new buyers will not understand what galvanized is and probably pass the boat by for one with stainless steel standing rigging.
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Old 26-09-2010, 13:58   #29
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Be careful before going down the "cheap" galvanised wire route. There are many more manufacturers of galv wire on the market now, they are not all good, the older European, American manufacturers have a history of quality products, some of the products coming from Eastern manufacturers cannot compare. Not all are bad, but then not all are good. Do your homework. you wont be dissappointed. The same advice also goes for SS.
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Old 26-09-2010, 19:19   #30
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Thanks. rephrased: Where is the best place to purchase the best grade of galvanized wire and fittings suitable for sail boat rigging for the best price?
The boat is a '72 model, fiber glass hull. I view changing to galvanized rigging as an upgrade. Keeping it looking good will be a little extra work, but the benefits of strength, durability, longevity and replacement cost outweigh the aesthetics of stainless. I'm a young 60 and look to spending the rest of my days on this boat and then I'm pretty sure that my son will take over the helm.
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