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Old 04-08-2013, 09:56   #1
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Furler Cover Repair, Again (Picture)

I hAve searched the forum but have yet to find an answer to my particular issue.

We have owned the boat for about 10 months but do not really know the age of the furling jib. It appears the thread and or fabric is giving out.

My wife has it in mind to get Theresa's and repair the cover materials by hand, I am not so sure about it but do like the low cost nature of the proposed repair.

She does not like the idea of a zip over cover as it involves work over time. Would tape be worth the effort?

We plan on having the boat for about 5 to 8 more years until we upgrade so longevity is a concern.

Any suggestions are welcome.
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Old 04-08-2013, 10:02   #2
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Re: Furler Cover Repair, Again (Picture)

Quote:
Originally Posted by The Garbone View Post
I hAve searched the forum but have yet to find an answer to my particular issue.

We have owned the boat for about 10 months but do not really know the age of the furling jib. It appears the thread and or fabric is giving out.

My wife has it in mind to get Theresa's and repair the cover materials by hand, I am not so sure about it but do like the low cost nature of the proposed repair.

She does not like the idea of a zip over cover as it involves work over time. Would tape be worth the effort?

We plan on having the boat for about 5 to 8 more years until we upgrade so longevity is a concern.

Any suggestions are welcome.

Take it down and examine it. If it just popped along the seams it is quite possible that the sail at least partially deployed and flailed about during a storm. It's amazing the number of people who do not adequately secure their headsails.

However, if fabric broke in the woven, not stitched part, examine those breaks carefully. That fabric is called "sacrificial" because it is INTENDED to deteriorate over time -- instead of the edges of the sail itself. It is the part intended to be exposed to the sun when the sail isn't being used.

You may well have a strong sail that needs to have its sacrificial replaced.
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Old 04-08-2013, 10:02   #3
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Re: Furler Cover Repair, Again (Picture)

I don't know what Theresa's is, but any sailmaker should be able to handle replacement of a sunbrella sun cover. Here in California they last about 5 years.

Zip-over cover sounds terrible to me.

Simply find a competent sailmaker and get the sunbrella replaced.

I think you are overthinking this one.
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Old 04-08-2013, 10:11   #4
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Re: Furler Cover Repair, Again (Picture)

I had my Sunbrella re-sewed at a sail shop in Miami. Cost was $200. plus shipping.
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Old 04-08-2013, 10:30   #5
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Re: Furler Cover Repair, Again (Picture)

It is a very common problem.

Usually when it looks like your photo all the stitching is weak and needs to be redone, not just the isolated areas where its failed at the moment.
In many cases the sacrificial fabric is weak as well.

Take it down and give the threads and the fabric the rip test.

Hand stitching is fine for small areas, but it is not viable to redoe all the stitching by hand which I think is what you will need.

If all the stitching and/or fabric is gone the only option is pay a sailmaker or buy a heavy duty sewing machine like a Sail Right. Consider using one UV resistant threads like Tenara, the sailmakers hate using it but the thread will outlive the fabric rather than the other way around.

Sewn covers instead of a sacrifical strip are used by some racing yachts (the sail is lighter and sets better in light air), but It is fiddly option for a crusing boat. You need a line or spare halyard to pull the cover up.
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Old 04-08-2013, 11:31   #6
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Re: Furler Cover Repair, Again (Picture)

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Originally Posted by noelex 77 View Post
It is a very common problem.

Usually when it looks like your photo all the stitching is weak and needs to be redone, not just the isolated areas where its failed at the moment.
In many cases the sacrificial fabric is weak as well.

Take it down and give the threads and the fabric the rip test.

Hand stitching is fine for small areas, but it is not viable to redoe all the stitching by hand which I think is what you will need.

If all the stitching and/or fabric is gone the only option is pay a sailmaker or buy a heavy duty sewing machine like a Sail Right. Consider using one UV resistant threads like Tenara, the sailmakers hate using it but the thread will outlive the fabric rather than the other way around.

Sewn covers instead of a sacrifical strip are used by some racing yachts (the sail is lighter and sets better in light air), but It is fiddly option for a crusing boat. You need a line or spare halyard to pull the cover up.

I took my headsail down for TS Debby and found that stitches were popping in small sections all over the sail. I had the entire sail restitched, with Tenara. It didn't cost that much, and it's a really good sail, worth protecting. Especially if you expect to keep it for a while, keeping the stitches tight really protects a sail.
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Old 04-08-2013, 12:26   #7
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Re: Furler Cover Repair, Again (Picture)

When redone be sure to use this thread Helios PTFE Lifetime Thread 8oz (1700 Yds) - Clear in Color.

Hand carry to a professional IF they do not have it. It comes with a lifetime guarantee against uv and or chemical damage.

I've been using V92 thread for 20 years on all my canvas work w/o any hint of thread damage.
Thread Antiwick V-92 Black Polyester UV 8oz (2,250 Yds)

It's usually the thread that gives out first.
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Old 04-08-2013, 12:42   #8
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Re: Furler Cover Repair, Again (Picture)

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When redone be sure to use this thread Helios PTFE Lifetime Thread 8oz (1700 Yds) - Clear in Color.

Hand carry to a professional IF they do not have it. It comes with a lifetime guarantee against uv and or chemical damage.

I've been using V92 thread for 20 years on all my canvas work w/o any hint of thread damage.
Thread Antiwick V-92 Black Polyester UV 8oz (2,250 Yds)

It's usually the thread that gives out first.


That's Teflon, just like Tenara.

I wouldn't just "insist that someone use it." It's really tricky to sew with. Sewing machines count on friction between spool thread and bobbin thread, and teflon doesn't do that. I would not want someone learning how to use it on my sail.

I would want a shop experienced in using it. You don't have to spend $115 for a whole spool of it. My place charged me $40 extra for Tenara, which they had in supply, and a machine permanently set up to handle it.
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Old 04-08-2013, 13:01   #9
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Re: Furler Cover Repair, Again (Picture)

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That's Teflon, just like Tenara.

I wouldn't just "insist that someone use it." It's really tricky to sew with. Sewing machines count on friction between spool thread and bobbin thread, and teflon doesn't do that. I would not want someone learning how to use it on my sail.

I would want a shop experienced in using it. You don't have to spend $115 for a whole spool of it. My place charged me $40 extra for Tenara, which they had in supply, and a machine permanently set up to handle it.
Lifetime is not cheap. IF one was to use that thread for every project, no need to ever restitch is not a bad deal.
That's NOT been my experience with the thread.
Yup, it's PTFE, I believe, and I've found that it is indeed quite easy to sew with. Just follow the directions and use a #18 needle for up to 10oz fabric, and a #20 beyond that.

I do all my own canvas and sail work so I do know what I'm doing rather than believe what someone with a financial incentive tells me. My guess is that your loft charges you so much to use that thread because they know you won't ever need restitching.
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Old 04-08-2013, 13:09   #10
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Re: Furler Cover Repair, Again (Picture)

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Lifetime is not cheap. IF one was to use that thread for every project, no need to ever restitch is not a bad deal.
That's NOT been my experience with the thread.
Yup, it's PTFE, I believe, and I've found that it is indeed quite easy to sew with. Just follow the directions and use a #18 needle for up to 10oz fabric, and a #20 beyond that.

I do all my own canvas and sail work so I do know what I'm doing rather than believe what someone with a financial incentive tells me. My guess is that your loft charges you so much to use that thread because they know you won't ever need restitching.
OF COURSE they charge extra for Tenara. It's expensive. And, it's not easy to sew with -- having sewn with it. if you have the right kind of machine (very expensive), it becomes easier, that's for sure.

And yes, those stitches will survive the life of the sail. That was well worth the $40. There is no need to buy a $115 spool of thread and provide it for a decent sail loft. That was my point. No one insulted your sewing ability. Anyone who can do his own canvas work knows what he's doing.

Your assumption that I just blindly accepted what some sail loft told me was rather offensive.
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