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Old 07-01-2008, 13:46   #16
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Originally Posted by Ron Tan View Post
Thank you, professor. Unexpressed thoughts can really burn a hole in a person's skull, can't they?

Just freakin curious.

I don't know if your statements have graduated to the realm of thoughts; just a heads up.
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Old 23-01-2008, 22:11   #17
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Um, Ron, I'm not sure what you are saying. I did not view your post as negative.
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Old 23-01-2008, 22:52   #18
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Good sail cloth did not sound the death knell of the junk rig

Materials limitations is not the reason most people who use the junk rig want to use it. My sails on Batwing were made out of perfectly conventional sail cloth. Ease of reefing and furling are usually the main reason for using the junk rig. I became very interested in ease of reefing and furling after sailing through about 2 weeks of 25' waves in the N. Pacific in September and October on an Erickson 35.

I also never wanted to crank a genny when tacking again (a millionaire lost a finger that way, you know, Rupert Murdoch's son,) or drag one down to the fore deck in a gale again, or fight with a sail that wanted the boat turned into the wind to come down. Turn into 25' breaking waves? No thanks! As for pulling down a genny in a gale, my wife never tried to do so again after the genny lifted her about 3 feet off the deck, and she was a healthy and fearless woman. The reliability of not worrying about the condition of dozens of bits of stainless steel holding up your rig is another factor speaking in favor of the junk rig.

For some, economy of construction is a main reason. A 65' catamaran can be built for over $100,000 less using a junk rig or a similar rig using a wing sail than with a marconi rig, because you can dispense with: Chainplates, toggles, turnbuckles, shrouds and stays, tangs, aluminum masts, mainsail tracks and slides, roller reefing, fancy mainsail reefing gear, track and cars for the mainsheet, track and car for the gennoa, genny sheet winches, multiple sailmaker made sails, and of course, perhaps, lots of optional goodies for spinnakers. In a large boat, you start to need some pretty fancy gear, like slides with ball bearings and compatible track, which add up very fast, and really huge and expensive winches. I priced each of these items for a 65' catamaran and was horrified at the total cost. No wonder these things usually retail for over a million bucks!

For that matter, a square rigged ship of the 1800s was square rigged because it was the only way to get enough canvas to carry the weight of large cargos. A marconi-rigged clipper ship would have been hopelessly under-canvassed. Even large gaff-rigged schooners were considered undercanvassed, and they could set a lot more canvas than a marconi rigged-version could have.

Quote:
Originally Posted by Pblais View Post
Modern sail cloth has made all these old sail rigs pointless. Materials in general have changed sailing more than any single factor. The junk rig does let you use almost any woven material as a sail since the design provides all the sail shape even if it isn't all that optimum. The idea may be curious but not worth actually doing.
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Old 24-02-2008, 13:47   #19
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Originally Posted by Pblais View Post
Modern sail cloth has made all these old sail rigs pointless. Materials in general have changed sailing more than any single factor. The junk rig does let you use almost any woven material as a sail since the design provides all the sail shape even if it isn't all that optimum. The idea may be curious but not worth actually doing.

... in your humble opinion.
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Old 24-10-2008, 13:45   #20
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I just started reading "Voyaging on a small income" and have become intrigued by the Junk Rig. But I don't really get the "unstayed" mast thing. The thought makes my stomach clench. I'm sure it is just a matter of what you are used to but ....
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Old 24-10-2008, 14:19   #21
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I think it's what you are used to. Had a neighbor in a 29ft. Columbia convert it to a junk rig. Sold everything he took off the boat to pay for everything he put on the boat.

The Chinese were sailing far places, and doing trade when the Europeans were hugging the coast line. If they could sail to India, and back then they have to go to windward one would think?
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Old 24-10-2008, 15:27   #22
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I have a 25 Coronado. Might be interested in talking to your friend. If you see him ask if he is willing to give advise. I'll be needing to replace my sails soon and it seems that for the cost of new marconi rigged sails I might be able to convert and build my own sails. It might be fun at the least and not too expensive.

My first question would be... "How do you get the mast to stay up without stays?"
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Old 24-10-2008, 16:20   #23
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rgranger, if you are considering converting to junk, I would suggest you buy a copy of "Practical Junk Rig" by HG Hasler and JK McLeod ISBN 0-7136-6975-6. This book will give you all the technical information you will need to design your mast and rig, and how to modify your boat to support it.

Also join the yahoo junkrig group and read the files by Arne Knervland, who has over the years, vastly improved the windward ability of the rig without adding expense or complexity to it.
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Old 24-10-2008, 17:03   #24
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No New Ideas--Only Old Ideas Rediscovered!

Blondie Hassler converted his Folkboat, Jester, to a Junk Rig in the early '60's and easily completed 4 single handed transatlantaic passages with the boat.




See also: Jester

There is no shortage of competitors for the Jester Challange (see http://www.jesterinfo.org/ ).

s/v HyLyte!
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Old 25-10-2008, 07:53   #25
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last time I saw the man he was sailing south from S.F. Ca., and headed to Mexico. That was 10 years ago.
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Old 26-10-2008, 20:29   #26
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We use this forum as an informational tool. Everyone gives their opinions for the sole purpose of helping YOU!, the person that asks the questions. Take the advise with a grain of salt and draw your own conclusions. There is no need to become sarcastic or insulting. You'll only turn people off from helping you next time.

Quote:
Originally Posted by Ron Tan View Post
Thank you, professor. Unexpressed thoughts can really burn a hole in a person's skull, can't they?



Just freakin curious.
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Old 07-03-2009, 09:27   #27
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junk rig

I built a 6 ton falmouth pilot (24'6") 20 years ago with my wife and put a junk rig on her. The difference with the junk rig is its ease of handeling. If you are looking for a realy safe and easy rig the junk takes some beating. the possitive points are as follows: No standing rigging, easily repaired sail, fully battened, all sail handeling from the cockpit, Very low cost. On the negative side they dont point but in saying this ours used to point to about 45 degs in a f3 and do 4 knots and as all cruuising people will tell you that is about your average speed when cruising over long distances. We sailed her in all wind conditions even once being caught off shore in 62knots of wind and had NO problems with the rig. I think its the lack of knowelege that puts people off the junk rig. As we get older it realy is the easiest rig to handle. If you would like more on this please either skype me or e-mail me
Regards Pete
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Old 07-03-2009, 09:33   #28
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pirate mast

You have to fix the mast through the deck and fix the foot to the hull either on a specialy made socket or on a glassed in foot
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Old 25-04-2009, 11:26   #29
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Thumbs up junk rig

Quote:
Originally Posted by Ron Tan View Post
I was wondering if anyone had converted their sailboat to a junk rig, curious on experiences from people who actually have done it.

Also, somewhat related, about a year ago I saw a website where they were marketing this experimental kind of batwing rig, the mast and everything folded up like a DaVinci birdwing contraption. They said it could be mounted on any boat, they were even working on a giant model to be mounted on merchant ships so they use less fuel...when not needed, it folds away and disappears.

Website has disappeared, can't find where this company has gone to...ring any bells? They seemed to have gotten to beta testing it on small to midsize boats, and POOF gone. Interesting concept!
Hi We had a 6Ton Falmouth Pilot that We fitted a Junk rig to and sailed it for 6 years if you are interested in our experiences please contact us on psg1640@gmail.com
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Old 01-05-2009, 17:12   #30
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A friend of mine converted a Cal 24 to a junk rig using a carbon fiber mast
he loves it. Spent the winter in Charlotte Harbor and had no problems.
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