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Old 04-08-2010, 20:49   #1
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Boom Restrainer

I want to add a boom restrainer. I'd like to hear how others have approached the problem. I've seen a few systems - including simply snapping a line from the toe rail to the boom which seemed to me to be dangerous/inconvenient when a gybe was called for and it has to be removed.
Thanks.
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Old 04-08-2010, 21:00   #2
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Only if you forget it before gybing.
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Old 04-08-2010, 21:10   #3
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You may want to look into something called a Boom Brake.
http://www.wichard.com/fiche-A%7CWIC...000000-ME.html
Looks relatively simple, apparently borrowed from climbing gear. They say their line is special, but I imagine you could rig something similar yourself, though the results might be less predictable.
I think I read someone's blog who swore by it (I think it was Colin Speedie).
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Old 04-08-2010, 21:13   #4
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I second the boom brake. Do not cut corners when it comes to safety! remember far out at sea you are the hospital police and fire department! Spend the extra money on safety. Ok I am done with my public service announcement now.. LOL
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Old 04-08-2010, 21:16   #5
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There are proprietary systems such as the boom brake which do the job.

If you rig up one yourself - and there are many ways of doing this - important things to consider are:
- You should be able to release it under load (after the accidental gybe).
- It should be rigged so that it doesn't slam into you standing rigging in the event of an accidental gybe
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Old 04-08-2010, 22:26   #6
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Never quite happy with the boom brake. Holds better than it lets loose and tends to bind the boom, especially in light airs. On the other hand it worked real well to take the dance out of the boom when sailing off the wind in light air. Took a lot of the wear off the gooseneck toggle.
US
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Old 05-08-2010, 09:12   #7
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The boom brake looks interesting though I think my boat will be at the upper end of its functionality. When I gybe I haul in the main sheet first which is a lot of work but does keep the boom under control. I'm more concerned with accidental gybes on a dead dwonwind run and the boom brake will still let the boom swing. Watching the video in 25 knots of wind made me wonder about wear on the sheets etc.
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Old 05-08-2010, 09:22   #8
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I have a Walder Boom Brake. Used to use it on my CS36 when I took it south. They are good but a bit of work and more lines on the deck as the lines are led aft to the cockpit. Also had to hold the brake away form the dodger with a bungee cord. I no longer use it. On my B393 I use a preventer which I make fast to the midship cleat, much simpler but not as safe as the boom brake. The Beneteau has swept back spreaders and you can't really let the mainsail all out going downwind. Too much chafe. I was going to put the boom brake on the Beneteau but decided the preventer was easier. I only coastal cruise but for deep sea stuff I'd go with the boom brake.
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Old 05-08-2010, 09:37   #9
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I think that the position of the main sheet on the boom is very important. If your main sheet is at the end of your boom and your boom brake are in the middle, you may break your boom if the brake jams. Same would be true if you have mid boom sheeting with a preventer at the boom end. In my case my sheeting is end boom, I like a preventer at the boom end set to a block midship running to a clutch for a fast release. It is all setup so I can release it at the helm. Jack
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Old 05-08-2010, 09:41   #10
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Stevens 47 View Post
I think that the position of the main sheet on the boom is very important. If your main sheet is at the end of your boom and your boom brake are in the middle, you may break your boom if the brake jams. Same would be true if you have mid boom sheeting with a preventer at the boom end. In my case my sheeting is end boom, I like a preventer at the boom end set to a block midship running to a clutch for a fast release. It is all setup so I can release it at the helm. Jack
You are absolutely right about this, and too few people realize it. I see preventers rigged incorrectly as often as not.
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Old 05-08-2010, 10:04   #11
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I'm wondering how a Walder boom brake would or could jam. There are no moving parts. The lines are tensioned so there's no loose line that could kink. The thing is just a worm screw and the friction slows the jibe.
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Old 05-08-2010, 10:19   #12
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Stevens 47 View Post
I think that the position of the main sheet on the boom is very important. If your main sheet is at the end of your boom and your boom brake are in the middle, you may break your boom if the brake jams. Same would be true if you have mid boom sheeting with a preventer at the boom end. In my case my sheeting is end boom, I like a preventer at the boom end set to a block midship running to a clutch for a fast release. It is all setup so I can release it at the helm. Jack
Thanks. I learned something I need to know.
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Old 05-08-2010, 11:02   #13
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The Wichard is a beauty. It's based upon a mountaineering descender. And it's a beautifully engineer piece of kit. It's a perfect transposition from climbing to sailing but...

Problem is it's only good up to 500 sf mainsail. Damn, my mainsail is 600sf.

So the question is --- given the sophistication of modern engineering tolerances, is a crash gybe going to overstress a Wichard thingymajig if its loaded at 120% - or to be blunt, will it bust before something more expensive and save me a bit of grief?
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Old 05-08-2010, 11:18   #14
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In my experience the secret in avoiding the boom moving when accidentally gybing is two fold. First, you need to get a good angle between the preventer and boom, ideally more than 60 degrees, and secondly the preventer must be bar tight, get it on a winch if you can and then tension the mainsheet against it. That way there is no movement in the boom if the sail is back winded.
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Old 05-08-2010, 11:23   #15
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Preventer

Here's a good article from the Sailing Press...

Sailing Magazine | Boom preventers
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