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Old 05-08-2010, 13:21   #16
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Two lines, one for each side, run from the boom end (or wherever your mainsheet attaches) forward to the bow, through blocks and back to the cockpit. About as bullet prove as you can get...
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Old 05-08-2010, 13:21   #17
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I use a boom brake on my 800 sqft main running the line aft to a spare winch. When tightened down it will stop the main from moving, let alone jibbing. At night or in big winds, we also run a preventer from the end of the boom to ahead of midship as a belt-and -suspenders type of set-up. Running South in the Trades, we never jibe anyway.
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Old 05-08-2010, 18:55   #18
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I think that the position of the main sheet on the boom is very important. If your main sheet is at the end of your boom and your boom brake are in the middle, you may break your boom if the brake jams. Same would be true if you have mid boom sheeting with a preventer at the boom end.
I would have thought the best place to attach the preventer is where the clew of the sail is attached to the boom - which moves along the boom as you reef.

This is where the force of the sail will act on the boom in a accidental gybe - not necessarily where the main sheet is attached (which will have no load on it in an accidental gybe in any case)

Forces go from sail to clew to preventer. Boom shouldn't take any (or very little) load.
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Old 05-08-2010, 19:25   #19
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Endless ways to do it and countless toys that claim to do the job too.

But make sure you have one or else the driver knows what they are doing.

We use one - just a line from the boom's end fore.

b.
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Old 05-08-2010, 19:41   #20
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Originally Posted by muskoka View Post
Problem is it's only good up to 500 sf mainsail. Damn, my mainsail is 600sf.

So the question is --- given the sophistication of modern engineering tolerances, is a crash gybe going to overstress a Wichard thingymajig if its loaded at 120% - or to be blunt, will it bust before something more expensive and save me a bit of grief?
I'm in the same boat, so to speak, with too big a main for the device.

My sense--and I'm guessing here--is that the limiting factor is not so much the device but working loads of the line it's built to accommodate. Which makes me wonder whether a spectra-core line of smaller diameter but higher strength might work.

Any engineers out here that can tell me I'm wrong? Anyone from Wichard willing to venture an opinion?
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Old 05-08-2010, 19:59   #21
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I'm with Randy on this one. Very simple and very fool proof.

regards,
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Old 05-08-2010, 20:20   #22
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My sense--and I'm guessing here--is that the limiting factor is not so much the device but working loads of the line it's built to accommodate. Which makes me wonder whether a spectra-core line of smaller diameter but higher strength might work.
I don't know the product, but I'd hazard a guess that the load limit refers to that device - Wichard can only know the diameter of the line that will be used, not the break load of the line.
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Old 05-08-2010, 20:40   #23
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Originally Posted by rtbates View Post
Two lines, one for each side, run from the boom end (or wherever your mainsheet attaches) forward to the bow, through blocks and back to the cockpit. About as bullet prove as you can get...
I'm curious about running the line all the way to the bow. What is gained over a block a bit fore of midship?
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Old 05-08-2010, 20:45   #24
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Dutchman makes a boom brake that will work on bigger boats

Welcome to the website DutchmanBoomBrake.com
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Old 05-08-2010, 21:28   #25
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I'm curious about running the line all the way to the bow. What is gained over a block a bit fore of midship?
It increases the angle of the line from the boom. Which is a slightly better way of resolving the forces, but not hugely so.

But for most this will be the only available solution - many boats will not have anywhere solid enough to attach a block between the mid cleats and the bow cleats - the mid cleats are usually too far back (for a boom end system) because they are too close to the pivot point of the boom (at the mast) - some (most?) mid cleats will actually be aft of the mast, which is no good at all.
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Old 06-08-2010, 12:40   #26
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If you can get nearly the same angle by attaching along the rail on a sturdy section of slotted toerail then ok.
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