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Old 06-02-2008, 13:25   #16
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Ummm...when I had a similar problem, I turned the boat around and removed the forestay instead. It was easier. Can you do this in your situation?
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Old 06-02-2008, 14:36   #17
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Ummm...when I had a similar problem, I turned the boat around and removed the forestay instead. It was easier. Can you do this in your situation?
Probably not due to the slipway configuration but we are investigating that also.

So did you have to remove the jib? Assuming roller-furling of course...
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Old 06-02-2008, 16:48   #18
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They say they have riggers that will do this of course. But do they have riggers that will be as concerned about my boat as I am??

I'd prefer to be in the drivers seat lest someone do something we'll all regret.
Right on the money here IMO, nobody cares as much about your boat as you do.

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Old 06-02-2008, 16:52   #19
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They say they have riggers that will do this of course. But do they have riggers that will be as concerned about my boat as I am??

I'd prefer to be in the drivers seat lest someone do something we'll all regret.
There are many things that I trust the boatyard to do right. I am not going to stand there and tell the Travelift driver how to do his job nor am I going to tell the guy setting up the boat stands how to do his. They are paid to do their job right and I am sure that the vast majority of people who work in boatyards take pride in their work as well. There is no doubt that thay ALL want to keep their jobs. I would not worry so much.

Being there to watch may be a good thing because it may help allay your fears, but to actively participate in something that they do all the time, and probably get in their way in the process, is not such a good idea.

I have been skippering commercial boats for over 25 years now and you just have to trust the people who are hauling your baby out of the water that they are going to do their job correctly...which they do 99.5% of the time. The fact that boatyards do screw up occasionally is why they also have insurance.

Kick back, have a beer and just watch and learn...and don't walk under the lift. Also, stay away until after your boat has been pressure washed and is securely on its stands.
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Old 06-02-2008, 17:08   #20
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I have been skippering commercial boats for over 25 years now and you just have to trust the people who are hauling your baby out of the water that they are going to do their job correctly...which they do 99.5% of the time. The fact that boatyards do screw up occasionally is why they also have insurance.

Kick back, have a beer and just watch and learn.

heh, perhaps there is a higher standard in the commercial industry but I have seen some really interesting travel lift fiascos and witnessed/been victim of many boat yard screw ups. I no longer subscribe to the theory that "they know what they are doing". In fact it seems to me that the marine industry in general is not a meritocrcacy. I dont understand it but I have seen some really amazing basic mistakes made by riggers, mechanics, travel lift operators, brokers, and the like.

I dont think doing things yourself can hurt, any error you make is a learning experience and you're less likely to err because you both care more and are more paranoid about your inexperience. The "pros" often screw up due to professional hubris IMO.

Also removing or slacking a stay isnt exactly rocket surgery.

Of course that is just my anti-dogma dogma. If you want to do it yourself go ahead. If you want to pay instead, you can do that too. I just dont think paying guarantees a better outcome. :-)

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Old 06-02-2008, 17:22   #21
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Mark, why don't you just go bow in? Wrap the furler drum and hang it over the side. The spar is keel stepped (I think) it won't fall down. We always go in bow first.
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Old 06-02-2008, 17:24   #22
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And tip them. $20 bucks per guy for beer and lunch is appreciated.

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There are many things that I trust the boatyard to do right. I am not going to stand there and tell the Travelift driver how to do his job nor am I going to tell the guy setting up the boat stands how to do his. They are paid to do their job right and I am sure that the vast majority of people who work in boatyards take pride in their work as well. There is no doubt that thay ALL want to keep their jobs. I would not worry so much.

Being there to watch may be a good thing because it may help allay your fears, but to actively participate in something that they do all the time, and probably get in their way in the process, is not such a good idea.

I have been skippering commercial boats for over 25 years now and you just have to trust the people who are hauling your baby out of the water that they are going to do their job correctly...which they do 99.5% of the time. The fact that boatyards do screw up occasionally is why they also have insurance.

Kick back, have a beer and just watch and learn...and don't walk under the lift. Also, stay away until after your boat has been pressure washed and is securely on its stands.
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Old 06-02-2008, 17:49   #23
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So did you have to remove the jib? Assuming roller-furling of course...
Yes. No need to make the job any harder than it has to be. You do the easy stuff because you can.
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Old 08-02-2008, 19:37   #24
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Lightbulb Yeeeha! Got it Sorted Out

I got a local guy who knows his way around rigging to take a look. We found that by bleeding away the hydraulic tensioner we had almost enough slack to lay the back stay on the boom end. Released the bottom clevis and almost had enough slack in the cables to move the entire rig aside.

Went below, removed the headliner and pulled up as much slack as we could. Got enough slack in all but one that I ended up cutting. Figures it was the one working radar that had to be cut, but the rats nest the PO created when he interfaced this unit with the GPS showed me that cutting and then splicing color-for-color would be no big deal.

So we're good to go for haul-out tomorrow!

Good news is that the chainplate is in pristine shape. Bad news is that the PO has built a nice web of wires that only he would recognize. Planned on new electronics anyway...

Many thanks for the suggestions in this thread!
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Old 08-02-2008, 19:44   #25
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Good luck with the haul-out, I always get a little nervous when I see my boat lifted out of the water and carried over dirt and gravel.
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Old 09-02-2008, 13:24   #26
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So did you have to remove the jib? Assuming roller-furling of course...
Did not remove the jib on the furler...we just emoved the pin at the furler base, walked it back a bit and secured it to the lifelines...but it is probably not a bad idea to remove the sail.
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Old 09-02-2008, 19:23   #27
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Cool And She's Out!!

Had room to spare.... not sure why you guys were so worried

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Old 25-05-2008, 07:18   #28
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Mark, hope your project finished up the way you wanted it to.
I seen your pic and have a non related request. I'm moving the stanchions for my life lines from my deck to a similar toe rail as yours and was wondering if you would be willing to take a close-up of your connection/fitting at your toe rail/stanchion. It may be helpful as I don't have this designed yet. Also is it strong?
If it's not too much trouble.
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Here's the best photo I have of the shroud arrangement...
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