Cruisers Forum
 


Join CruisersForum Today

Reply
 
Thread Tools Rate Thread Display Modes
Old 10-09-2010, 10:55   #1
Registered User

Join Date: Jun 2009
Location: Annapolis, MD
Boat: Sabre 34-1
Posts: 153
Adding Luff Padding to a Roller Furler - DIY

Greetings,

I have a Sabre 34 with roller furling. The jib is still functional, but old enough that significant cash modifications are probably not warranted. When reefed, even a little, the jib rapidly becomes bellied out -- typical of roller reefing.

I'd like to consider adding a luff pad, either foam or rope. Has anyone undertaken this task? Any pointers? I've seen the foam type, and understand it. Sailrite sells 12" wide foam for this for $2.75/ft, which would run me just over $100 -- although I assume that would have to be top-coated with sailcloth. I have never seen the rope type pad in use, or even pictures, although the concept sounds pretty good. How is the rope stuff attached, and is it a DIY project? I've done heavy sewing work before, so if these projects are straightforward machine and hand sewing, I'm on it.

Any comments would be appreciated!

Harry
1979 Sabre 34
__________________

__________________
sailingharry is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 11-09-2010, 07:04   #2
Senior Cruiser
 
osirissail's Avatar

Cruisers Forum Supporter

Join Date: Feb 2009
Location: A real life Zombie from FL
Boat: Gulfstar 53 - Osiris
Posts: 5,416
Images: 2
If the sail is as old and stretched as you said, then even adding a Luff pad is not going to make much difference. It is easy to install if you have a sail sewing machine. But it is a variable width addition to the sail with the widest portion up the luff nearest the middle of the sail and then it gets narrow at the top and bottom of the sail.
- - I would just suggest a new foresail with the luff padding built into the design by the sailmaker.
__________________

__________________
osirissail is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 11-09-2010, 08:18   #3
Registered User
 
svHyLyte's Avatar

Join Date: Mar 2006
Location: Tampa Bay area, USA
Boat: Beneteau First 42
Posts: 3,422
Images: 25
We have a 155 with foam padding in the luff that came with the boat when we bought her. I have to say that I don't think much of the sail and I certainly wouldn't spend the money to have one made. If the fabric in your sail is still any good, have it recut. If not, the foam might extend the usedful life a bit but is it really worth the effort?

FWIW...
__________________
"It is not so much for its beauty that the Sea makes a claim upon men's hearts, as for that subtle something, that quality of air, that emanation from the waves, that so wonderfully renews a weary spirit."
svHyLyte is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 11-09-2010, 09:18   #4
Senior Cruiser

Cruisers Forum Supporter

Join Date: Aug 2009
Location: between the devil and the deep blue sea
Boat: a sailing boat
Posts: 17,314
The need for more foam at the center can also be solved by adding two stripes along the luff - one longer along about 75% of the luff and one shorter along only the area where the sail is deepest (perhaps 50% of luff's length). Space them well for perfect rolling.

Works very well on our sail.

b.
__________________
barnakiel is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 11-09-2010, 10:10   #5
CF Adviser
 
Bash's Avatar

Cruisers Forum Supporter

Join Date: Dec 2008
Location: sausalito
Boat: 14 meter sloop
Posts: 7,260
I had a rope type installed by a sail loft on a previous boat, and didn't think much of it in terms of how it pointed when partially furled. In my mind, the only good way to have a good range is to have at least two sails, a jib and a genoa, and swap them out as conditions warrant.
__________________
cruising is entirely about showing up--in boat shoes.
Bash is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 11-09-2010, 21:34   #6
Registered User

Join Date: Jun 2009
Location: Annapolis, MD
Boat: Sabre 34-1
Posts: 153
As an avid racer (on OPB's), I have to agree with Bash that the only really good way to perform in heavy air is to shift down to a #2 or #3. However, my boat is a 34 footer that I sail with my girlfriend, a good-spirited but very inexperienced lady. I can't see doing a headsail change on a pitching foredeck with her -- and then I REALLY can't see stuffing that big wet 150% down below! Yes, on the Olson 30 I race on, we'd do that half way through a weather leg without a second thought. Roller reefing brings cruising to the boat sailed by a couple.

And I have to agree that my headsail probably needs replacing. It certainly would be an improvement, even if it doesn't "need" it. But a used sail that is better than mine is over $1000, and a new one runs north of $3K -- and neither of those numbers are in the budget for this year or next. Better alternator, upgraded wiring, leaky ports, propane conversion (CNG vanished overnight here in Annapolis), and other more urgent tasks have my budget pegged.

I was contemplating an affordable way to "improve" the performance of a sail that is going to last 2-3 more years, minimum. I have more time than money, and a willing attitude. But I also sometimes beat dead horses. And from these responses, it sounds like I'm better off living with the huge belly (and the associated hit on point and heel) when the wind demands a reef (or rolling it all up and motoring), than wasting time on this project.

Which was probably the point of my question! I appreciate the reality check. I could well have found myself this winter spending $100 and a few hours on the task, which sounds to be the proverbial dead horse.

Thanks again for the input,

Harry
__________________
sailingharry is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 12-09-2010, 05:34   #7
Registered User

Join Date: Sep 2010
Location: NY-FL
Boat: Sold
Posts: 291
Free fix - tighten the backstay, as in really tight
__________________
Jimbo2010 is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 12-09-2010, 06:31   #8
Senior Cruiser
 
Blue Stocking's Avatar

Cruisers Forum Supporter

Join Date: Dec 2008
Location: St. Georges, Bda
Boat: Rhodes Reliant 41ft
Posts: 4,114
If you want to see if the sail really does have any life left in it, or at least use it until the end of the season, why not get some thin foam, of reasonable density, cut it to the taper, spot tack it with contact cement on some sail-repair tape squares, and seal the edges with sail repair tape.
Not the prettiest, but an inexpensive test.
__________________
so many projects--so little time !!
Blue Stocking is online now   Reply With Quote
Old 12-09-2010, 07:05   #9
Senior Cruiser
 
osirissail's Avatar

Cruisers Forum Supporter

Join Date: Feb 2009
Location: A real life Zombie from FL
Boat: Gulfstar 53 - Osiris
Posts: 5,416
Images: 2
Quote:
Originally Posted by Blue Stocking View Post
If you want to see if the sail really does have any life left in it, or at least use it until the end of the season, why not get some thin foam, of reasonable density, cut it to the taper, spot tack it with contact cement on some sail-repair tape squares, and seal the edges with sail repair tape.
Not the prettiest, but an inexpensive test.
I think that is a very good idea - you can get some of the thin foam padding/sheets used to pack stuff for mailing. It is about an eighth to quarter inch thick. Then use duck tape or fabric tape (available in better hardware stores and Home Depot - type stores) to attach it to the luff of the foresail. It should hold up for a couple/three days while you try out the system to see if it really makes any difference in the sail when partially furled.
- - Before spending hundreds or more dollars and lots of time getting a real foam luff tape installed, it would be nice to know if it will make any difference - or - it is just time to get a new foresail.
- - If the sailcloth is not frayed or has a lot of patched tears in it, you can get it cleaned and re-resined by an outfit like "Sailcare" in Pennsylvania and then have a sailmaker re-cut the sail to take out the stretch.
__________________
osirissail is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 12-09-2010, 12:55   #10
Senior Cruiser

Cruisers Forum Supporter

Join Date: Aug 2009
Location: between the devil and the deep blue sea
Boat: a sailing boat
Posts: 17,314
I have seen many new furling sails done very, very well and still efficient when partly furled. The problem is, with many cruising boats, the sail to be furled is a relatively biggish genoa and, furled, it will move the SA way fore - perhaps not what you want when going upwind in heavy air.

Thus, if there is an inner forestay, hoisting a smaller, flatter jib will nearly always be the way to go.

A good sailmaker can make a well furling jib that will be usable half-furled. Successful retrofitting may be much more difficult and often not worth the buck.

b.
__________________
barnakiel is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 12-09-2010, 14:06   #11
CF Adviser
 
Bash's Avatar

Cruisers Forum Supporter

Join Date: Dec 2008
Location: sausalito
Boat: 14 meter sloop
Posts: 7,260
Quote:
Originally Posted by sailingharry View Post
As an avid racer (on OPB's), I have to agree with Bash that the only really good way to perform in heavy air is to shift down to a #2 or #3. However, my boat is a 34 footer that I sail with my girlfriend, a good-spirited but very inexperienced lady. I can't see doing a headsail change on a pitching foredeck with her -- and then I REALLY can't see stuffing that big wet 150% down below!
Actually, I was suggesting making the switch at the dock. Here in SF Bay, where summer winds are reliably heavy and winter winds are reliably light, we switch to the yankee in mid-spring, and then back to the lapper in mid-fall. As a consequence, even though we may sometimes be overpowered in the winter and underpowered in the summer, we can always point high enough to tack through 70 degrees or less. (And if we're reaching and need a bit more power, there's always the gennaker.)
__________________
cruising is entirely about showing up--in boat shoes.
Bash is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 10-10-2015, 17:42   #12
Registered User
 
MapleSugarMan's Avatar

Join Date: Mar 2013
Location: Fort Pierce, FL USA
Boat: 1980 Cal 39 Mk II Type 3
Posts: 29
Re: Adding Luff Padding to a Roller Furler - DIY

For whatever it's worth, we just bought a used 8.5oz, 110% with a 44' luff
from Second Wind Sails in Fort Lauderdale for $600.00. For another $200 they cleaned it. It's in great shape and nice and clean. We found John Malloy, who owns the company, to be very helpful. He gave us great advice on the fabric weight we need for where we plan to sail; and he had the best prices the of any of the sites we checked; and we've been shopping online since May. You can reach him at: info@secondwindsails.com; and the web address is secondwindsails.com.
__________________
Scott
MapleSugarMan is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 20-10-2015, 12:13   #13
Registered User
 
rognvald's Avatar

Join Date: Jan 2011
Location: Summer: In the land of Wooly Mammoths
Boat: Pearson 34-II
Posts: 2,252
Images: 2
Re: Adding Luff Padding to a Roller Furler - DIY

Harry,
We installed a luff rope on our 135% genoa last Winter. The sail sets much cleaner than before and can reef to 100% without bellying. Good luck and good sailing.
__________________
"And those who were seen dancing were thought to be insane by those who could not hear the music."
Friedrich Nietzsche, Thus Spake Zarathrustra
rognvald is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 20-10-2015, 23:46   #14
Senior Cruiser
 
Jim Cate's Avatar

Cruisers Forum Supporter

Join Date: May 2008
Location: cruising SW Pacific
Boat: Jon Sayer 1-off 46 ft fract rig sloop strip plank in W Red Cedar
Posts: 11,440
Re: Adding Luff Padding to a Roller Furler - DIY

"Harry,
We installed a luff rope on our 135% genoa last Winter. The sail sets much cleaner than before and can reef to 100% without bellying. Good luck and good sailing."

rog, that thread was five years old... that sail is probably in the dumpster by now!

Jim
__________________
Jim and Ann s/v Insatiable II , lying Port Cygnet, Tasmania once again
Jim Cate is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 21-10-2015, 09:18   #15
Registered User
 
rognvald's Avatar

Join Date: Jan 2011
Location: Summer: In the land of Wooly Mammoths
Boat: Pearson 34-II
Posts: 2,252
Images: 2
Re: Adding Luff Padding to a Roller Furler - DIY

Quote:
Originally Posted by Jim Cate View Post
"Harry,
We installed a luff rope on our 135% genoa last Winter. The sail sets much cleaner than before and can reef to 100% without bellying. Good luck and good sailing."

rog, that thread was five years old... that sail is probably in the dumpster by now!

Jim

Thanks, Jim,
I guess we all will have a good laugh with this one! Best, Rognvald
__________________

__________________
"And those who were seen dancing were thought to be insane by those who could not hear the music."
Friedrich Nietzsche, Thus Spake Zarathrustra
rognvald is offline   Reply With Quote
Reply

Tags
roller furler

Thread Tools
Display Modes Rate This Thread
Rate This Thread:

Posting Rules
You may not post new threads
You may not post replies
You may not post attachments
You may not edit your posts

BB code is On
Smilies are On
[IMG] code is On
HTML code is Off
Trackbacks are Off
Pingbacks are Off
Refbacks are Off


Similar Threads
Thread Thread Starter Forum Replies Last Post
Need Help Finding Luff Diameter for Furler Garrett Deck hardware: Rigging, Sails & Hoisting 1 07-08-2010 19:38
Which Roller Furler? Idylles15.5 General Sailing Forum 20 21-01-2010 17:53
Roller Furler Jamming riptide Deck hardware: Rigging, Sails & Hoisting 7 11-11-2009 14:08
Roller furler main sail esse0esse Multihull Sailboats 46 19-11-2007 21:50
Choosing a new roller furler. Help bmiller Monohull Sailboats 12 11-07-2007 06:17



Copyright 2002- Social Knowledge, LLC All Rights Reserved.

All times are GMT -7. The time now is 10:26.


Google+
Powered by vBulletin® Version 3.8.8 Beta 1
Copyright ©2000 - 2017, vBulletin Solutions, Inc.
Social Knowledge Networks
Powered by vBulletin® Version 3.8.8 Beta 1
Copyright ©2000 - 2017, vBulletin Solutions, Inc.

ShowCase vBulletin Plugins by Drive Thru Online, Inc.