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Old 08-03-2009, 13:00   #1
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Residential Stainless Steel Sinks?

Will regular SS Sinks bought at places like Home Depot stand up to Ocean Cruising and the subsequent salt water?
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Old 08-03-2009, 13:05   #2
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Yes, I've used them. Bought a high quality satin finished european one once and it turned out beautiful. Generally a good one will likely be even better than the usual "marinized" (ie: small, cheap high iron tawiwan stainless and unuseable) marine ones. My opinion is any double sink you cant get a whole frying pan in is useless. I'll take one large one anyday...
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Old 08-03-2009, 13:23   #3
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The other big consideration is how deep they are...deeper=better
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Old 08-03-2009, 13:24   #4
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Take a magnet and select the one it doesn't stick to and is best polished.

For the galley: deep sinks with vertical walls make sense while under sail. I have seen good ones at Lewis Marine.

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Old 08-03-2009, 14:22   #5
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The sinks in boats are residential sinks. Any reasonable quality SS sink will work fine. Typically, they are not the best quality stainless so will require some attention to keep them bright and shiny. Would assume that the more costly the sink the better the stainless but I wouldn't bet on that. Fashion plays a big part in the cost of home sinks.

Be very careful about the depth of the sink. Most boats in the under 40' range have sinks that are the maximum allowable depth possible above the waterline. Be sure that the bottom of the sink is a couple of inches above the waterline if on centerline. Even higher off centerline.

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Old 08-03-2009, 14:37   #6
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Okay, Thanks.
I'll have a look at Lewis Marine and others.
Problem that I see with most of the sinks that I see in boats is that the low spot (where the drain is) in NOT very pronounced (fairly flat) and therefore would not drain completely while the boat heals. Square bottoms leave water in the corner.
That aside I have attached one that looks interesting but I would rather have a similar diverse sink (with inserts) but as a single.

Anyone have such a sink?

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Old 25-04-2009, 10:14   #7
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How about this?

For an above counter Sink, in order to get the drain higher/above the waterline.
A stainless steel roaster?
Just put a drain in it.
The top could be a drain board or a large frying pan or ..... You could seal the top to the roaster/sink while underway as added protection against water infiltration. The rack would be useful also.
Just started looking so this may not be the one, but as far as concept, what do you think?

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Old 25-04-2009, 10:45   #8
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We enlarged the hole in the sink to put in a larger diameter drain on our last boat. In doing that, lost the recess that the drain would normally rest in. Result was there was always a little bit of water trapped in the sink. Not a big thing but embarassing if something that had to be kept dry accidentally fell in the sink.

The pot that you illustrated wouldn't work and see no reason to go with it. Wonder how you would install it and seal around the edge. The lid would be in the way if you kept it on the pot and wouldn't seal unless you caulked it in place. I could see using an oven roasting pan, the shallow kind that come with stoves if you could find one in stainless. That would work if you have to have a very shallow sink but is the only reason to go that route.

Seems to me you are trying to make a simple task difficult. Any thing you use for a sink, be sure the drain is in the fore and aft center line of the sink. If the drain is offset, more water will accumulate on one tack than the other and could overflow onto the counter at steep angles of heel.

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Old 25-04-2009, 11:11   #9
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I really prefer two deep side by side sinks. We have used two heavy duty hand sinks from Aero manufacturing. I like to be able to clear of the counters into one, and store the soda bottles,etc there while day sailing. The two we have are 10" deep.
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Old 25-04-2009, 12:53   #10
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Residential Stainless Steel Sinks?
I have a double sink like in the pic but narrower (330mm wide) no problem.
Installing a light garden irrigation valve (1 inches) in the drain between the two sinks, prevent the primary sink filling the secondary sink. Draining the sink using a siphon loop will empty completely the sinks drainpipes. All my grey water goes to a small sump reservoir including mast drain and chain locker drain and it is pumped out using a Jabsco macerator pump with discharge through the cockpit drains by a smaller pipe or a Henderson manual pump. The pumps could be connected straight to the sinks drains then no problem with high above the water line. My Marine manual-pumping Toilet is also connected to a Jabsco macerator pump that makes it also electrically operated. Better not sitting on when flushing out.
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Old 25-04-2009, 20:07   #11
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Quote:
Originally Posted by chala View Post
Residential Stainless Steel Sinks?
I have a double sink like in the pic but narrower (330mm wide) no problem.
Installing a light garden irrigation valve (1 inches) in the drain between the two sinks, prevent the primary sink filling the secondary sink. Draining the sink using a siphon loop will empty completely the sinks drainpipes. All my grey water goes to a small sump reservoir including mast drain and chain locker drain and it is pumped out using a Jabsco macerator pump with discharge through the cockpit drains by a smaller pipe or a Henderson manual pump. The pumps could be connected straight to the sinks drains then no problem with high above the water line. My Marine manual-pumping Toilet is also connected to a Jabsco macerator pump that makes it also electrically operated. Better not sitting on when flushing out.
I'm doing my best to come up with a way to raise the sink so I don't have to run the waste water to a sump. I just can't find an above counter sink that looks any good and I don't think that to skirt a regular sink will look very good. Not to say that a roaster looks good (a bit tacky).
That said I'm hoping that if I through out an idea perhaps someone will share their brilliant idea.
Anyone??

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Old 25-04-2009, 20:13   #12
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I agree with the magnet suggestion. Cheaper stainless has a higher iron content.
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Old 26-04-2009, 09:35   #13
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Extemporaneous View Post
I'm doing my best to come up with a way to raise the sink so I don't have to run the waste water to a sump. I just can't find an above counter sink that looks any good and I don't think that to skirt a regular sink will look very good. Not to say that a roaster looks good (a bit tacky).
That said I'm hoping that if I through out an idea perhaps someone will share their brilliant idea.
Anyone??

Extemp.
Good point. You have to think out of the box for something like this. While not totally on topic, here's something to chew on.

About 4 years ago, my wife wanted to replace our entire kitchen. We added a bar/peninsula so that the new oven/stove would face the bay window we installed a couple years before that. Now, I could make you jealous, so I won't tell ya about the beautiful views we had of sunset over Salem Harbor through that window - so let me get to the point.

She wanted an above-counter sink next to the stovetop, and we looked around for something which looked nice. Initially, the only things we found which looked nice were all in the $800+ range. Well, we took some time off in the middle of the design phase to vacation in Cabo San Lucas, Mexico. While checking out some local shops, we found a large pewter salad bowl which we immediately knew was the ticket. Cost? We bargained with the owner, and got it for half the posted price: $25 instead of $50! I used an old hole saw to cut the drain hole, and the final product was beautiful!

Moral of the story: Don't discount any initial "crazy" ideas!
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Old 26-04-2009, 13:01   #14
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The higher the polish, the less rust prone it will be also, That's what I like about many of the euro sinks with the satin polish as opposed to the typical cheaper sinks with the sanded/ground finish. The magnet trick is good in general, but even higher quality stainless will be magnetic if it has been "work hardened" (ie: bent, formed, drawn etc) without annealing prior to the final minimal forming. Generally though, unless you never clean your galley, rust shouldnt be too much of an issue!
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Old 01-05-2009, 06:54   #15
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I have bought two sinks in the last month for my boat project. One off of ebay made by Scandvick which is very nice quality and expensive,(although I paid much less than retail because it was a second). The second is for the galley and because the space is a bit small I found a single, 16 3/4" x 13 3/4"x 8 3/4" deep bar sink. At a little over $100 and a nice satin finish I'm impressed. I'll try the magnet check today
Both sinks will drain into a common sump. Is there any reason to plumb a p-trap since it's all just grey water? I've heard sumps can smell from time to time with food particles floating around.

Bill
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