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Old 25-02-2016, 11:19   #31
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Re: Macerator pump-- really that bad?

Johnson
Shurflo
Jabsco

In that order of quality.

Our OEM Shurflo lasted 28 years. Just bought a new one after doing some research on them.

Diaphragm pumps are good, too. The "stuff" we think of as "solids" really break down fairly quickly in the tank, as reported by Peggie Hall.
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Old 25-02-2016, 12:11   #32
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Re: Macerator pump-- really that bad?

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Originally Posted by Cadence View Post
I doubt it has anything to do with ecology, just being able to discharge efficiently. A turd is a turd.
Macerated human waste, not to mention paper products, breaks down much faster. No "brown trout". Not a big deal offshore I guess.
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Old 25-02-2016, 13:03   #33
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Re: Macerator pump-- really that bad?

As a couple of people have already pointed out, if you want an electric holding tank discharge pump the Sealand 'T' pump is the way to go. It's a bellows based pump using two joker valves that they call 'duckbills.' I've installed a dozen or so over the years, never a failure. They can dry prime higher and seem to do a better job of evacuating the than the 'macerator' design does. Gravity is best, of course, and manual pumps almost never fail, but we have a T pump on ours based upon customer success and we're happy with the decision.

For the person who asked about onboard treatment systems like the Raritan Type 1's (LectraScan/Scan, Purisan, etc) they are legal in all waters except those designated 'no discharge' by the EPA. While you can't use them on the Great Lakes and the Keys, most but not all waters in between are fine as of this writing. The Raritan website has good info on this.
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Old 25-02-2016, 13:23   #34
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Re: Macerator pump-- really that bad?

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Originally Posted by Scott Berg View Post
As a couple of people have already pointed out, if you want an electric holding tank discharge pump the Sealand 'T' pump is the way to go. It's a bellows based pump using two joker valves that they call 'duckbills.' I've installed a dozen or so over the years, never a failure. They can dry prime higher and seem to do a better job of evacuating the than the 'macerator' design does. Gravity is best, of course, and manual pumps almost never fail, but we have a T pump on ours based upon customer success and we're happy with the decision.

For the person who asked about onboard treatment systems like the Raritan Type 1's (LectraScan/Scan, Purisan, etc) they are legal in all waters except those designated 'no discharge' by the EPA. While you can't use them on the Great Lakes and the Keys, most but not all waters in between are fine as of this writing. The Raritan website has good info on this.
Thanks for the response on ( LectraSan.) Purely academic since I have a couple someplace I think? They have to be like me, older than dirt.
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Old 25-02-2016, 16:10   #35
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Re: Macerator pump-- really that bad?

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That's what I'm thinking. I'd also assume that the, hum, product is not more solid from tank to outflow, compared from bowl to tank. I.e., what's the benefit of having a macerating pump after the tank?
Most would consider a slurry to be superior to pieces and chunks. Regardless of ones opinion on that, the macerator is just a pump that will handle what is in the tank. A piece of TP or who-knows-what that might be in the tank would clog most conventional electric pumps. The macerator is able to digest anything reasonable and keep on pumping.

If you want to jump in there and crank a hand pump, more power to you. I prefer to hit the switch and be done.
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Old 25-02-2016, 16:59   #36
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Re: Macerator pump-- really that bad?

The ElectroScan is a newer version of Lectrasan which uses significantly less electricity.
It also keeps a log of uses and will alert you if there are any problems.

I have one and like it.
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Old 11-11-2017, 12:47   #37
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Re: Macerator pump-- really that bad?

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I have 2 on my boat. I is still original from installation late 2000, the other I replaced 2 years ago when it started binding up. I could have just rebuilt it but for the price I decided to just replace it and feel that 13 years was good service life.
Si in researching a replacement for my macerator pump I️ found this thread that had the above.

So I’ll update that the replacement pump lasted a little over 1 year
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Old 11-11-2017, 13:51   #38
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Re: Macerator pump-- really that bad?

This may sound crass. Instruct visitors what doesn't go in a head eg. kotex tampons etc.. Macerators are pretty reliable and work well with things eaten or used to wipe.
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Old 11-11-2017, 14:16   #39
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Re: Macerator pump-- really that bad?

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Originally Posted by eceavchss View Post
I had a Jasco pump with the brass bolts and it failed within a year. They have changed to stainless steel bolts and that should fix the issue.
And they will send you those bolts for free if you ask nicely. Replacing them is not difficult and a new pump will have the new bolts.

BTW: My pump was about ten years old when the brass bolts failed.

To the OP, you have to watch web forums. There's no product ever made that someone, somewhere hasn't had a problem with and all too often, they post that problem on every web forum they can find. Remember, there are thousands of people who haven't had a problem with those pumps and others like me who just made the repair with the free parts but didn't think it was worth posting about.
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Old 11-11-2017, 14:23   #40
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Re: Macerator pump-- really that bad?

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Is there any evidence the macerating pump between tank and outflow has any ecological benefits? .......... .
Why would there be evidence of that or a reason to look for evidence?

Poop is poop, no matter how you look at it but would you rather look at it chopped up or look at floating turds and wads of paper? Besides, once you chop it up it will go around bends and fittings more easily and is less apt to clog.
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Old 11-11-2017, 14:26   #41
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Re: Macerator pump-- really that bad?

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This may sound crass. Instruct visitors what doesn't go in a head eg. kotex tampons etc.. Macerators are pretty reliable and work well with things eaten or used to wipe.
I seldom have visitors on my boat and even more seldom have visitors who might use feminine hygiene products but when I do I put small plastic zip lock bags and brown paper bags in the head and my wife instructs them to put the used product in the plastic bag, put the plastic bag in the paper bag and put the paper bag in the trash bag.
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