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Old 31-05-2013, 09:05   #31
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Re: Does anyone dig in their compost?

shakti---if you actually read my words, you will have read that i have used every kind of head that boats can have. i also have experience with the kinds land based residences can have and have had for over 60 years. dont even mention the portable and public temporary fixtures...how about chamber pots--mebbe we should return to the use of those ......
human waste contains e choli--yes is toxic. folks die of it when ingested. causes much illness when ingested .... even by those with alleged immunity to it secondary to constant contact. the appearance of immunity is due to the medications taken for the exact problem you seem to think is not happening.
enjoy your choice-and remember, some folks are older than you and have had much more experience than you, and may even know of what they speak, as experience is the best teacher...yes composting heads DO stink. they smell like the heap out in the farmrs back 40. hge keeps it there because he doesnt like the stink, either. glad to hear you dont mind that stink--i do mind it, so i will not keep a e choli factory in my boat which actively cruises.
it is a lot easier to clean and disinfect a traditional head than it is to disinfect an echoli farm. or an entire boat after the bag of feces and peat ruptures inside the boat or when you have to clean entire contents of a boat due to knockdown with stowed echoli farms on board. your choice--have fun.
marine heads are great--keep trying to re invent the wheel, or outhouse or compost heap----but DO manage to pre-think a location to which you yourself can carry your own personal feces to shore and where it will be welcomed with open arms.

these are NOT new ideas, btw--they have been used and discarded long ago by folks who understood the invention of antibiotics and treatment of cholera and yellow fever and other feces borne diseases.

yes, human waste IS toxic waste......it is responsible for many disastrous illnesses not just echoli..
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Old 31-05-2013, 20:54   #32
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I'm sorry, Z, I love your posts most of the time, but I can't just let false info set. Come to my boat, no smell. And no, human waste is not toxic waste. Unless it sits in your holding tank and grows and grows in a wet environment. Those bacteria, present in all persons waste stop reproducing in the dry environment of compost.

I guess what bothers me is Sooooooo many people who just continue to repeat the same wrong info, essentially calling the ever-increasing number of users of composing head liars. There are only a very small number of people who have tried them and not loved them, and every case I've read has been user error.

But none of this answers the OP's question. Yes, many of us "dig"our composters, but I don't use it for anything. It's just Sooooooo much cleaner and easier and massively cheaper on a new install, it's what I prefer. The space savings is nice too.
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Old 31-05-2013, 21:12   #33
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Re: Does anyone dig in their compost?

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Originally Posted by ElGatoGordo View Post
I'm sorry, Z, I love your posts most of the time, but I can't just let false info set. Come to my boat, no smell. And no, human waste is not toxic waste. Unless it sits in your holding tank and grows and grows in a wet environment. Those bacteria, present in all persons waste stop reproducing in the dry environment of compost.

I guess what bothers me is Sooooooo many people who just continue to repeat the same wrong info, essentially calling the ever-increasing number of users of composing head liars. There are only a very small number of people who have tried them and not loved them, and every case I've read has been user error.

But none of this answers the OP's question. Yes, many of us "dig"our composters, but I don't use it for anything. It's just Sooooooo much cleaner and easier and massively cheaper on a new install, it's what I prefer. The space savings is nice too.
Composting anything correctly takes skill, I believe that they can work in the right conditions and if managed properly. I just don't think that there's much of a population that is able/willing to do that on a boat.
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Old 01-06-2013, 08:20   #34
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Re: Does anyone dig in their compost?

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I love my composter... I built my own system for a crew of 5, lasts 2 Weeks full time use, 2 months or more day sailing. I also have a y-valve for the urine to go overboard as appropriate.
Pics? Maybe in a separate thread? I think there's a lot of interest, particularly as a DIY. I've read everything on the net. There's an outfit giving heads away in 3rd world countries where water is an issue. One thing I'm sure of: we've got to stop flushing our wastes with clean fresh water. I'm not in favor of mandatory anything but ... sheesz.

Golf courses in the desert? Not when I'm king, even tho I realize many are using recycled water.
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Old 01-06-2013, 10:51   #35
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Quote:
Originally Posted by cheoah

Composting anything correctly takes skill, I believe that they can work in the right conditions and if managed properly. I just don't think that there's much of a population that is able/willing to do that on a boat.
Actually you have to ask yourself how three major companies producing fairly expensive piece of equipment and growing in leaps and bounds if there's not that much interest.

Like anything, there will be far less interest in the DIY approach.

As to skill I really can't see it. The only skill I see is in keeping the urine going forward, which my three female crew tell me is not a problem for them. Perhaps composting in your backyard does require skill, I wouldn't know. This is all about simplicity and cost for me.

Blue Crab, I have all those pictures, I've been asked several times to post it. I will do so soon.

My final statement in this thread, since this has been beat to death over and over in many threads, is this:

I don't advocate people change their heads or change their minds (see what I did there?). Use what you like, and what works for you. But we can't have all kinds of repeated wrong information because there are some people who are trying to decide, and they deserve facts.
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Old 02-06-2013, 04:14   #36
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Re: Does anyone dig in their compost?

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My final statement in this thread, since this has been beat to death over and over in many threads, is this: I don't advocate people change their heads or change their minds (see what I did there?). Use what you like, and what works for you. But we can't have all kinds of repeated wrong information because there are some people who are trying to decide, and they deserve facts.
Thanks for your comments on this thread, El; and I agree the fun is in DIY. But my question was not quite the standard: I can see the benefit of waterless heads and am interested in the compost concept while thinking that a chemical version might be simpler and cheaper.

The main fault of porta-potti designs IMO is the use of flush water, not least because it becomes the bulk of the content in the waste tank. If porta-potties were instead based on the bucket concept, as compost heads are, there'd be no need for flush water - and no need to seperate the urine. And they'd also need far less frequent emptying.

But these are just thoughts - guess I need to do some bucket tests to see...unless another poster has already been there, done that?
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