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Old 05-02-2010, 08:35   #61
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That locker does not appear to be very well ventilated....I wonder if that may be a contributing factor?
On most installations I have seen, and I admit that you could count them on one hand, once the copper enters the locker it goes to rubber.
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Old 05-02-2010, 12:04   #62
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Did you read any of the links...It looks to me like copper is the way to go if you're going through any bulkheads...also several of the links note a maximum length of rubber,,,and its not much.
IMO if the copper is secured reasonably well, work hardening is just not going to happen....there is no way your boat flexes that much.
I did, and it was very short, 1.5 meters I think. Those were UK and Canadian standards, though, what about US? I've seen places selling pre-made hoses longer than that. If that's against the standards than what on Earth is it used for? Also, what's the reason for that max length?

As someone else pointed out.
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Copper flexes and fatigues, hose degrades. Use due diligence.
So then why is it ok for copper to be longer, but not rubber?

Also, as someone else pointed out, seems all the so called authorities seem to be in disagreement. I'm about ready to just go with a George Foreman, and deal with the battery drain. Either that or go veg and eat everything raw.
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Old 05-02-2010, 12:12   #63
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Originally Posted by James S View Post
That locker does not appear to be very well ventilated....I wonder if that may be a contributing factor?
On most installations I have seen, and I admit that you could count them on one hand, once the copper enters the locker it goes to rubber.
Since when are lockers supossed to be ventilated? Last I checked you only want a vent on the bottom, which mine is. You just can't see the vent in either of the photos.

Not sure why you'd do that. You're just adding another connection (AKA: failure point). If it's to avoid corrosion in the locker, what's to say the copper won't rust in another spot? Behind a bulkhead, under the cockpit floor, etc. or any other place where it won't be as noticeable as in the locker.
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Old 05-02-2010, 12:27   #64
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For now, I've decided, to stay with copper until a leak test fails, then I'll consider a change.
Does this mean you will wait till you blow up to replace it?

Personally I would rethink that thought if it is in question replace it! Some prefer cooper some hose the real point is if it is old and looks at all suspect then just replace it. I like hose because I have had corrosion problems with copper, but hose is not perfect either. Use what you think will work best for you, install it carefully and using common sense, but don't not replace it because you are not sure what is "best" Best is new and safe, be it copper or hose.

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Old 05-02-2010, 12:52   #65
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Gentlemen
This realy IS a no brainer.
If in doubt, why not check with the emergency services, the lawyers, the insurers, the marine archiatects, the coast guard et al.

In other words, would you go to your local bar for advice on a brain tumour or ask your garbage collector to fix your laptop?
No
So why come here for advice and then disregard, argue over or ignore it?

Its a bit of a clue what to do when the boat was originally designed for copper. The design isnt bust, so dont fix it.
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Old 05-02-2010, 13:38   #66
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LPG supply lines may be either Hose, or Metallic.
Some people prefer hose to copper supply line tubing, because hose is much easier to install, and rationalise that legitimate reason on the basis that it won`t corrode or develop stress/fatigue cracks.

I believe that either will be safe and long-lasting, when PROPERLY INSTALLED.

See MARINE LPG SYSTEMS
http://www.abycinc.org/committees/A-01.pdf
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Old 05-02-2010, 13:57   #67
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The propane hose in my boae was 30 years ols when i got her
Did a high pressure test and hose was still good.. Replaced it anyway as that was why
I remoned tthe linw from the boat..
Replaced it with high presssure propane hose, but, I took the hose abd fitrting to a hydraulic shop to assembl the hose
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Old 06-02-2010, 07:45   #68
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Quote:
Originally Posted by anjou View Post
Gentlemen
This realy IS a no brainer.
If in doubt, why not check with the emergency services, the lawyers, the insurers, the marine archiatects, the coast guard et al.

In other words, would you go to your local bar for advice on a brain tumour or ask your garbage collector to fix your laptop?
No
So why come here for advice and then disregard, argue over or ignore it?

Its a bit of a clue what to do when the boat was originally designed for copper. The design isnt bust, so dont fix it.

OMG do you mean ask for directions ?
Why do women always think that we should do that.... ?


Just kidding anjou

The reason he is unsure about the advice he was given, is because there really is no right or wrong way here, EXCEPT to replace this copper asap.
He could use copper tubing, he could use propane hose. Or he could do away with the propane in his boat entirely, and go to diesel, alcohol, or electric.
Since there are so many choices it is only right to ponder which one is best for him.
I suggest that as already posted, any of these choices (copper or hose) would be fine, if it is installed properly, and checked/maintained appropriately.

Bob
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Old 04-07-2010, 17:44   #69
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Hose length

Howdy,

I'm currently thinking through my gas install myself and have read through this thread and have come to the conclusion that hose is best...

However... here in Australia, hose suppliers aren't allowed to supply more than 3m max length (with professionally swaged fittings) due to some bizarre regulatory reason.. I think the total hose run will be about 8m.

I also don't think I can use copper - since the run has a million bends to go around (all almost 90degrees)...

Any thoughts? I'm pretty sure that they will sell me the hose.. but won't install the fittings for me... kind of stupid, but hey.

(..and no, calling a licensed plumber/gasfitter is not an option here for a variety of reasons)
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Old 04-07-2010, 22:10   #70
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Illegal and no insurance...

DIY gas connection would be illegal in Australia. It may also invalidate your insurance.

The actual gas connection must be made and certified by a licensed gas-fitter.

I employed Matt Cope (I think he advertises in Afloat magazine). He did an initial survey where he told me what was required, where to get the bits and then came and connected it all up. Expensive, but worth it for the peace of mind.

My only quibble was that he should have told me to use galvanised tanks. Only $100 filled as opposed to $45 + filling for steel.
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Old 05-07-2010, 02:21   #71
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DIY gas connection would be illegal in Australia. It may also invalidate your insurance.

The actual gas connection must be made and certified by a licensed gas-fitter.

...........
And some Marina' s may ask to see your gas certificate.....
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Old 05-07-2010, 03:47   #72
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DIY anything is illegal in Australia - so who cares.. But this is the wrong forum for that discussion.

I will however look him up to see if he can point me to a hose.

Thanks for that.

Quote:
Originally Posted by Boracay View Post
DIY gas connection would be illegal in Australia. It may also invalidate your insurance.

The actual gas connection must be made and certified by a licensed gas-fitter.

I employed Matt Cope (I think he advertises in Afloat magazine). He did an initial survey where he told me what was required, where to get the bits and then came and connected it all up. Expensive, but worth it for the peace of mind.

My only quibble was that he should have told me to use galvanised tanks. Only $100 filled as opposed to $45 + filling for steel.
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Old 05-07-2010, 06:01   #73
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And some Marina' s may ask to see your gas certificate.....
Really? What if you're a foreign vessel? Guess that's just another reason for staying on the hook?
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Old 05-07-2010, 19:47   #74
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I could start a thread on some of the bizarre engineering ideas some owners have come up with.

They should sail under bimimis with a hat on....cuz it must be the sun and boredom that drives them nvts. Micromanagement and getting away from the K.I.S.S. factor.
and the comingling of a number of anecdotal experiences....leads to.......
more work for me......
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Old 11-07-2010, 22:17   #75
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36 year old copper still working

Myabe they used different copper back in 1974 but my old Prout had the copper tubing glassed in place for most of it's run (approx 15 feet) And the original Calor stove still works great. I doubt rubber would last as long. I probably ought to pressure test it though.
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