Cruisers Forum
 


Join CruisersForum Today

Reply
 
Thread Tools Rate Thread Display Modes
Old 22-06-2008, 15:35   #1
Now on the Dark Side: Stink Potter.
 
CSY Man's Avatar

Cruisers Forum Supporter

Join Date: Aug 2003
Location: Ft. Lauderdale
Boat: 2001 Albin 28TE.
Posts: 3,399
Images: 115
Soo, how tight should the stuffing box be.?

Boat on the hard and plenty of work to do on this 30 year old lady.

Changed the cutless bearing, nice and snug now.
Also repacked the stuffing box with GFI packing and teflon lube. Tightened the stuffing box untill I could feel a difference in resistance turning the shaft with the zink. (Makes sense?)

Obviously I can't fine tune the stuffing box untill the boat is in the drink and I adjust the box using the no-drip method and feeling for heat buildup if too tight.

Have used the same adjustment for over 5 years, never touched the thing..Good stuff that GFI..Virtually maintenance free, but being so long ago I adjusted, wondering if there is a rule of thumb for adjusting while on the hard???

__________________

__________________
Life is sexually transmitted
www.odincharters.com
www.susanhanssen.com
CSY Man is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 22-06-2008, 18:10   #2
Registered User
 
Inthewind's Avatar

Join Date: Mar 2007
Location: Charlotte harbor, FL
Boat: Morgan OI 414
Posts: 251
After repacking and tightening many stuffing boxes throughout the years you sort of get a feel for it. You don't want it too loose, yet you don't want it too tight either, sort of in between if you know what I mean. After you get splashed in, you just want to keep an eye on it for awhile until you are confident that it is right. Stuffing boxes are always something that I am keeping my eye on and adjust when needed. New packing material should last along time before furthur adjustments are required once it is adjusted right.
__________________

__________________
Inthewind is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 22-06-2008, 18:13   #3
Now on the Dark Side: Stink Potter.
 
CSY Man's Avatar

Cruisers Forum Supporter

Join Date: Aug 2003
Location: Ft. Lauderdale
Boat: 2001 Albin 28TE.
Posts: 3,399
Images: 115
Agree on all of the above...So what is the answer to my question?

Should you be able to hand-turn the shaft with your hand on the shaft, not the prop...?
__________________
Life is sexually transmitted
www.odincharters.com
www.susanhanssen.com
CSY Man is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 22-06-2008, 18:18   #4
Registered User
 
Inthewind's Avatar

Join Date: Mar 2007
Location: Charlotte harbor, FL
Boat: Morgan OI 414
Posts: 251
Yes, you should be able to turn the shaft by hand.
__________________
Inthewind is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 22-06-2008, 18:24   #5
Senior Cruiser
 
Therapy's Avatar

Cruisers Forum Supporter

Join Date: Jul 2007
Location: W Florida
Boat: The Jon boat still, plus a 2007 SeaCat.
Posts: 6,894
Images: 4
That depends more on your tranny does it not?
One hand or two?
Enough friction to slow the shaft would burn it up I would think.
There is no magic, and don't tighten it till it gets good and wet either.
__________________
Therapy is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 22-06-2008, 18:56   #6
Registered User
 
Inthewind's Avatar

Join Date: Mar 2007
Location: Charlotte harbor, FL
Boat: Morgan OI 414
Posts: 251
I am assuming that CSY Man has a Borg Warner behind his perkins. Borg Warner transmissions are able to turn by hand. I have yet to see a tranny that would not turn freely while in neutral,but I am sure they exist.
__________________
Inthewind is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 22-06-2008, 21:17   #7
Now on the Dark Side: Stink Potter.
 
CSY Man's Avatar

Cruisers Forum Supporter

Join Date: Aug 2003
Location: Ft. Lauderdale
Boat: 2001 Albin 28TE.
Posts: 3,399
Images: 115
Quote:
I am assuming that CSY Man has a Borg Warner behind his perkins.
Well, it is a Hurst something. It turns quite freely when in Neutral...

The reason for this thread is that I did not turn the shaft by hand before I tore into the stuffing box, nor did I count the turns loosening the stuffing box..Should have done that, could have done that, but forgot...

Not really critical, but thought I ask some of the old salts for their hard earned advise anyway.
__________________
Life is sexually transmitted
www.odincharters.com
www.susanhanssen.com
CSY Man is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 22-06-2008, 22:02   #8
Senior Cruiser
 
Roy M's Avatar

Cruisers Forum Supporter

Join Date: Feb 2007
Location: Southwestern Yacht Club, San Diego, CA
Boat: Searunner 40 trimaran, WILDERNESS
Posts: 3,042
Images: 4
Okay, here is a really simple solution. Let's assume the shaft is turning and it's been tightened so that it still leaks. It's supposed to, otherwise the friction does bad things. As long as the shaft turns under power, let it drip once every couple seconds. Put your hand on the shaft coupling. It can be warm, but not hot enough to hurt you. That won't hurt the shaft. Now, put the engine in idle and give the shaft a couple minutes to cool down, and most importantly, allow the wax surrounding the flax or teflon packing to seize up. Properly tightened, the shaft drips will stop, and will return when the shaft friction builds up. Now, for the really tough part, accepting the fact that shaft logs are dynamic. That means you get to fiddle with them every so often. Properly done, they are accessible, the lock nut hasn't been tightened to the point that you need a couple of wrenches and four hands to loosen it. Before leaving the boat, make sure it has stopped dripping. If not, loosen the lock nut, give the packing nut a small turn until it stops leaking, then hand tighten the lock nut. Eventually the packing wears away and you have to replace it. That requires an extractor, looking sort of like a corkscrew, FOR THE SIZE PACKING you use. Don't know for sure? Slide the packing nut completely off the shaft, disregard the seawater pouring in, and measure the gap between the inside diameter of the packing nut and the edge of the shaft. Slam the packing nut back on the shaft log and tighten it until the water stops coming in. Go to the marine store and buy a package of shaft packing. Get one size above and below, as well, if you aren't sure (it's not too expensive) Now, wrap the packing around the shaft IN THE DIRECTION THAT THE SHAFT TURNS NORMALLY (that's what the old salts taught me, but it still doesn't make any sense). Slice this roll of packing in the axis of the shaft. Save three complete rings, toss the rest. Again, open the packing nut and slide it out of the way. Pull out the old packing with the extractor, slip the three rings on the shaft and ease them down into the collar of the packing nut, rotating the sliced part so it doesn't line up with another slice, then reassemble the packing nut to the shaft log. Tighten down, put the engine in gear and let it wear in for a bit. Keep testing the temperature with your hand. Go out and buy a spare pack of packing for next time and put the extractor with it. You just saved yourself a bunch of bucks. I'll add some pics in a couple of days.
__________________
Roy M is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 23-06-2008, 00:31   #9
Senior Cruiser
 
Alan Wheeler's Avatar

Cruisers Forum Supporter

Join Date: Dec 2003
Location: Marlborough Sounds. New Zealand
Boat: Hartley Tahitian 45ft. Leisure Lady
Posts: 8,038
Images: 102
Quote:
Properly tightened, the shaft drips will stop, and will return when the shaft friction builds up.
Ummm, Roy.... you sure you got that right??
__________________
Wheels

For God so loved the world..........He didn't send a committee.
Alan Wheeler is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 23-06-2008, 15:49   #10
Senior Cruiser
 
Roy M's Avatar

Cruisers Forum Supporter

Join Date: Feb 2007
Location: Southwestern Yacht Club, San Diego, CA
Boat: Searunner 40 trimaran, WILDERNESS
Posts: 3,042
Images: 4
I guess I wasn't too clear. When the shaft has cooled down, tighten the packing nut with your hands until it JUST stops dripping. Run the engine in forward for a couple minutes to check that it starts dripping ENOUGH to cool the packing nut and the shaft at the packing interface. Then shut it down again after use, check the packing nut, tighten ever so lightly until the dripping stops, tighten the lock nut and have a beer. The idea is that it is a dynamic operation, requiring fiddling. If it's too much for the owner, they can invest a lot of money on a so-called "dripless" shaft log. I was able to install mine in a spot where it could get easy access and regular attention. Some boats aren't built that way. If there is a hell, it will have a special corner for the designers and builders who make stuff that can't be serviced by mere mortals. And they get to spend eternity standing on their heads performing maintenance to the holding tanks of Hades.
__________________
Roy M is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 23-06-2008, 16:40   #11
Registered User

Join Date: Mar 2007
Location: Lakeland, FL
Posts: 1,296
Having repacked several stuffing boxes - all of them on the hard - I can safely say that ......... well, dunno. Tighten it until it 'feels' not loose but not too tight, put it in the water and see what happens, start engine, etc., adjust accordingly.

Hope this helps.

Next boat will have a dripless shaft.
__________________
slomotion is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 23-06-2008, 16:50   #12
Now on the Dark Side: Stink Potter.
 
CSY Man's Avatar

Cruisers Forum Supporter

Join Date: Aug 2003
Location: Ft. Lauderdale
Boat: 2001 Albin 28TE.
Posts: 3,399
Images: 115
Yeah, thanks that was all good info and should go in the Study Hall for adjusting stuffing boxes.

The stuff I am using, Virtually Dripless Packing has been so good that I forgot how to...I could probably leave it alone another few years, but this is preventive maintenance.
__________________
Life is sexually transmitted
www.odincharters.com
www.susanhanssen.com
CSY Man is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 23-06-2008, 18:35   #13
Registered User

Join Date: Nov 2005
Location: Ohio
Posts: 2,313
If it squeals it is too tight..............
__________________
Joli is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 23-06-2008, 19:13   #14
Registered User

Join Date: Oct 2007
Location: St Charles MO
Boat: Easterly 36 Aft Cabin
Posts: 180
3 to 6 drips per min.
__________________
7.25 years until the Carib
easterly is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 23-06-2008, 21:00   #15
Registered User
 
Jesse's Avatar

Join Date: Apr 2008
Location: Oro Bay Puget Sound
Boat: Irwin sloop
Posts: 374
A digital infra-red thermometer has made this chore a bit easier. They are handy for 0ter things as well.
__________________

__________________
Jesse is offline   Reply With Quote
Reply

Thread Tools
Display Modes Rate This Thread
Rate This Thread:

Posting Rules
You may not post new threads
You may not post replies
You may not post attachments
You may not edit your posts

BB code is On
Smilies are On
[IMG] code is On
HTML code is Off
Trackbacks are Off
Pingbacks are Off
Refbacks are Off


Similar Threads
Thread Thread Starter Forum Replies Last Post
Stuffing box or re-stuffing the box / dripless Dave in Eugene General Sailing Forum 10 28-12-2007 16:45
Stuffing box help Iain Propellers & Drive Systems 18 30-08-2007 07:32
Stuffing box challenged! ssullivan Construction, Maintenance & Refit 25 30-01-2007 17:08
Rudder stuffing box snakebird Construction, Maintenance & Refit 1 21-03-2005 18:20
Stuffing box replacements delmarrey Construction, Maintenance & Refit 2 10-09-2003 14:12



Copyright 2002- Social Knowledge, LLC All Rights Reserved.

All times are GMT -7. The time now is 19:46.


Google+
Powered by vBulletin® Version 3.8.8 Beta 1
Copyright ©2000 - 2017, vBulletin Solutions, Inc.
Social Knowledge Networks
Powered by vBulletin® Version 3.8.8 Beta 1
Copyright ©2000 - 2017, vBulletin Solutions, Inc.

ShowCase vBulletin Plugins by Drive Thru Online, Inc.