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Old 21-12-2007, 14:37   #16
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Pulling the rudder is no big thing. It's digging the hole that's the hard part.

It only takes me an hour to get the rudder out/in but to pull the strut, re-caulk and fair in would take hours.
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Old 21-12-2007, 15:11   #17
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Originally Posted by markpj23 View Post
Well... this is not giving me that warm fuzzy feeling...

I sure hope I have enough clearance so that I don't have to drop the rudder... no seepage at all from the rudder stock, turns easily, etc. I'd like to leave well enough alone for a change...

Can't wait to get started on this one...

OK all together now, "I LIKE boats... I really really LIKE boats..."

Looking at the "angle of the dangle" on that prop-shaft, it looks like it may contact the rudder just below the center-line of the rudder-shaft. If that's the case (they'll need to fire that engineer for doing something that makes sense ) you should be able to clear the rudder.

I'm sure glad to see that you have a respectable sized prop-shaft. That other one bothered me.

One more tip.....be sure to have an impact wrench handy when you get ready to remove the prop-flange from the gear-box. Even if it's just an air ratchet ( Harbor Freight Tools - Quality Tools at the Lowest Prices ). It's not the torque that you may need, it's the impact vibration to loosen any corrosive particles in the threads. Applying torque first can sometimes make matters worse by compressing the corroded paticles in the threads, thereby locking the bolt in place. It's better to start with impact. When replacing any bolts in a marine environment, I recommend using lock-tite or some anti-seizing formula.

Also, I believe that your mounts have height adjusting nuts built into them for aligning your engine. At least the pictures that I saw of that other Endeavour 52 did.

I may be mistaken but it looks like you have a line cutter on your prop-shaft. I wonder if a previous owner could have had a problem. The only thing that I am wondering is, if you may have a strut alignment issue.
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Old 21-12-2007, 16:43   #18
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Crui-sing (Kroo-Zing) 1. Fixing your vessel in exotic places.
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Old 11-02-2008, 08:22   #19
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Situation Update

Now that we're on the hard there's no doubt that I'll be pulling the shaft. Unable to make more than 3 knots on the way to the yard, more heavy black smoke. But the good 'ol Yanmar kept right on going with no overheat problems

Force required to turn the shaft is excessive - I cannot rotate it by hand if I grab the shaft. I must grab the prop to have enough leverage to get it to move. No side to side play in the shaft but I think a new cutlas bearing is in order regardless.

Funny thing is - the shaft seal didn't leak a drop on the way over here. Lasdrop rep says I probably lost the spring compression against the seal but who knows at this point.... Looking real hard at the Tides Marine Strong Seal to replace this setup. But maybe not.

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Old 11-02-2008, 08:44   #20
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Mark..

Mark,

The cause of your LasDrop leaking is likely the pressure washing of the bottom. Follow me on this one. Under high pressure, a barnacle chip or, paint chip or chunk, likely got forced between the seals faces. This is easily cleaned out with a rag between the faces. I had it happen to me and in less than fives minutes all was well and good again.

P.S. I have thousands of miles and hours of shaft spin on dripless seals with zero problems. But, and this is a big but, you have to use what you feel comfortable with.

The USCG feels comfortable with dripless seals as well as builders like Hinckley and other high end builders so they have been proven reliable. Keep in mind that a traditional stuffing box is also connected to the hull by rubber so both systems have a weak link..
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Old 11-02-2008, 09:31   #21
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...The cause of your LasDrop leaking is likely the pressure washing of the bottom. Follow me on this one. Under high pressure, a barnacle chip or, paint chip or chunk, likely got forced between the seals faces. This is easily cleaned out with a rag between the faces. I had it happen to me and in less than fives minutes all was well and good again...
Makes perfect sense... will see how it looks since it's got to come off anyway. Thanks!
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Old 11-02-2008, 11:20   #22
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good luck with it Mark:

Hope it turns out to be the least expensive option.
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Old 11-02-2008, 15:12   #23
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One more tip Mark.....

When you get the shaft out, polish as best you can. If you can get it in a lathe, that would be great. Get a couple sheets each of 180g, 220g, 300g etc, all the way to 800g wet & dry sand paper. Then you can go over it with a rag and rubbing compound. S/S sands rather easily. This entire process will take an hour or less to complete.

This will bring the shaft up to a mirror finish and make it harder for anything to attach to it. Anything that attaches to it will easily wipe off. It will also slow down any corrosion.

The side benefit is, if there are any cracks in the shaft, they will stand out like a sore thumb by the time you get to 600g paper.

It is never a good idea to put any type of paint or other coating on S/S. S/S requires oxygen for it's anti-corrosion properties to work. Without access to oxygen (which is in water too) it can degrade a lot faster.
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Old 11-02-2008, 16:02   #24
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If you don't have a lathe...any major city will have shops that refinish shafts and rollers for the printing and elevator industries. They can rebuild, fill, polish to make them like new.
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Old 11-02-2008, 16:11   #25
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My PSS has been fine since it was installed in 2000.
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Old 11-02-2008, 20:10   #26
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Thanks guys - I've already located the local shafting expert through referrals from others at the yard. I plan to have the shop check trueness, etc and will polish the shaft.

PO had painted the shaft with bottom paint - I thought that was normal. So I should polish and leave it bare?
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Old 12-02-2008, 15:43   #27
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Bare, yup. I suppose a nice heavy tin or copper electroplate would be the next best thing--toxic to many critters but "fused" to the shaft.
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Old 12-02-2008, 19:00   #28
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Mark,
I forgot to mention. There is a hydraulic press out there that can push the shaft out of the coupler from the inside.
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Old 12-02-2008, 20:36   #29
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One more tip Mark.....

When you get the shaft out, polish as best you can. If you can get it in a lathe, that would be great. Get a couple sheets each of 180g, 220g, 300g etc, all the way to 800g wet & dry sand paper. Then you can go over it with a rag and rubbing compound. S/S sands rather easily. This entire process will take an hour or less to complete.

This will bring the shaft up to a mirror finish and make it harder for anything to attach to it. Anything that attaches to it will easily wipe off. It will also slow down any corrosion.

The side benefit is, if there are any cracks in the shaft, they will stand out like a sore thumb by the time you get to 600g paper.

It is never a good idea to put any type of paint or other coating on S/S. S/S requires oxygen for it's anti-corrosion properties to work. Without access to oxygen (which is in water too) it can degrade a lot faster.
Good advice but.........


DO NOT SAND OR REMOVE ANY MATERIAL WHERE THE COUPLING GOES!! This area is under extremely tight tolerances to make the fit and facing of the coupling perfectly aligned and tight..
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Old 12-02-2008, 21:46   #30
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I have one lasdrop shaftseal, with carbon and stainless steel friction surfaces and I'm quite happy with it. Once pressure is adjusted by compressing the below, that all that need be done. I've never had any trouble with it, and I'm surprise to read all those comments. In fact I have had this type of seal on my boats since 15 years, without a single complaint. I believe I'm not an exception.
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