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Old 14-11-2008, 02:23   #16
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... i think silver melts at what, 700 degrees or so? ...
I’d google “silver plating”, prior to purchasing any silver. It may be a little (actually, a LOT) trickier than you anticipate.

Sterling silver melts between a it’s solidus temperature of about 760 degrees C (1,400 F) and it’s liquidus temperature of about 930 or 940 degrees C (1,724 F).

Silver Solders typically melt at about 732 degrees C (1,350 F).
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Old 14-11-2008, 05:47   #17
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You're right..I was a bit low on my temp there..I might still be stuck on the old lead solder melting point. Still, I think it might work. Too bad you can't find a silver spray paint that actually IS powdered silver. Guess that would give the steel hulled guys a break..expensive, but you could silver plate the entire hull..below the waterline anyway. I think from a shock standpoint that a polished silver or chrome boat would be something to see. I know there are paints made now, REAL expensive, but they actually look like polished silver, and reflect light just like a silver plate mirror.

Too bad you couldn't just imbed an electrical grid into the gelcoat like that of a bug zapper, but in a screen mesh pattern so that anything that grew would cover the + and - and get zapped.. nothing more annoying than having an engine overheat because barnacles started growing in the water jackets and intakes.

If they can make teflon stick to aluminum, why not fiberglass??

Got to be a better way than scraping the things off..will a 3 or 4000 psi pressure washer blow them off? I've always been fresh water, but my pacemaker is going to be blue water this summer..
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Old 15-11-2008, 09:31   #18
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If they can make teflon stick to aluminum, why not fiberglass??
Ummm... they do, sort of. Teflon-based anti fouling paints have been around for years. Unfortunately, they don't do a very good job of anti fouling and are seeing less and less use, at least in my neck of the woods. There are a whole new generation of "foul release" type coatings, which work by forming a surface too slick for fouling organisms to readily attach to. But these tend to be expensive, difficult to apply and need very frequent cleanings to be effective.
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Old 19-11-2008, 10:00   #19
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Has anyone tried this product? It is supposed to be too slippery for anything to grow on it.

nanotech WOW! is designed to provide the greatest surface protection for any surface in the most environmentally friendly way. This water borne polymeric finish is processed with nanotechnology to miniaturize the finishing particles so they penetrate the surface and bond with the finish to provide the longest lasting protection from friction, static, soil and sun. WOW! contains no solvents, PTFE, silicone, petroleum distillates, oils, or waxes. It is free of VOCs (volatile organic compounds), explosive propellants or any other damaging chemicals.

Green wax products | Environmentally friendly wax | Eco-friendly cleaning products | Green friendly wax
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Old 19-11-2008, 11:20   #20
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Has anyone tried this product? It is supposed to be too slippery for anything to grow on it.

nanotech WOW! is designed to provide the greatest surface protection for any surface in the most environmentally friendly way. This water borne polymeric finish is processed with nanotechnology to miniaturize the finishing particles so they penetrate the surface and bond with the finish to provide the longest lasting protection from friction, static, soil and sun. WOW! contains no solvents, PTFE, silicone, petroleum distillates, oils, or waxes. It is free of VOCs (volatile organic compounds), explosive propellants or any other damaging chemicals.

Green wax products | Environmentally friendly wax | Eco-friendly cleaning products | Green friendly wax
Yup - tried a sample of Nanotech (my version ex Denmark was designed to protect metals) on some chromed brass big rigging screws. To be fair it worked better than expected. Kept them shiney for maybe 6 months - but don't think it would work underwater for anywhere as long.

Seriously - try out the indeleble felt tip pen. It's worked for me in Australian, UK, Med and Caribbean waters. I suspect it is the smooth coating (and not the colour guys) that maybe makes it work. Or maybe I'm just been lucky and the slime just hates my prop?
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Old 02-12-2008, 01:02   #21
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For understanding antifouling, cupper and zinc anodes, :

Tin and barnacles?
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Old 02-12-2008, 01:55   #22
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Guess I need to stock up on sharpies then eh? Do you need to smooth down the props and shafts first, or do you just scuff them up a little bit to knock any oxidation off? I can't imagine how many sharpies it would take to do my two props and shafts..more time than anything else. I wonder if you could buy the ink in bulk from the sharpie factory? It would take a week to get my stuff all done.

Dave
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