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Old 17-11-2008, 13:37   #16
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Thanks CSY Man, but if I am not mistaken you have to be a US citizen to get that licence. I am do have a green card but I am sure that will not qualify me for the USCG ticket.
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Old 17-11-2008, 13:45   #17
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Pherhaps someone here can help me out a bit with information. I aquired a Canadian Small Craft Ticket (40 Ton), about 20 years ago. Unfortunately, it is not valid in the US.
I'm not sure, but it sounds like this ticket is now what is called the Master, Limited - not only is it not valid in the US, it's not valid universally in Canada. This ticket is endorsed on a case-by-case basis for a specific job, region, even boat.

Unless you're a US citizen, don't even think about getting a USCG ticket.

Sorry I haven't provided an answer to your question - it's a good one, and I'm keen to see what answers you get.

Kevin
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Old 17-11-2008, 17:18   #18
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For information about the OUPV license go to: USCG National Maritime Center - Charter Boat Captain Information

For the OUPV license, the fees are Evaluation: $ 100.00; Examination: $ 110.00 and Issuance: $ 45.00. The examination fee is usually included if you take a Coast Guard approved Captain's course. The license allows you to operate un-inspected passenger vessels including sail and auxiliary sailing vessels while carrying six or less "passengers" including at least one "passenger for hire" on the waters designated on the license.

License Requirements:
A Physical Exam approximately $100 from your doctor and certified on using the USCG form CG-719K. A Drug Test and membership in a USCG Mandated Random Drug Testing Program such as the APCA (American Professional Captains Association) program $49/year. See: maritime drug testing, pre-employment, Coast Guard licensing and CPR and First Aid certifications. The CPR can be from either the Red Cross or the American Heart Association or certified equivalent Coast Guard approved course, but the First Aid has to be from the Red Cross or certified equivalent Coast Guard approved course. From the Red Cross the combination course is about $60.

Your Sea Time Can Be On Another Person's Boat Or Yours. Sea Time Is Counted From Your 15th Birthday. For All Licenses, 90 Days Of Your Sea Time Must Be In The Last 3 years.

The OUPV (6-Pack) un-inspected 6 passenger vessels on inland waters license requires 360 days total boating experience, 90 of those days must be in the last 3 years, no offshore time is needed U.S. citizenship is not required. Minimum age is 18.

The OUPV (6-Pack) un-inspected 6 passenger vessels inland or offshore up to 100 miles license requires 360 days total boating experience, 90 of those days must be in the last 3 years, 90 days, in any time frame, must be in Near Coastal waters (offshore). U.S. citizenship is not required. Minimum age is 18.

Note: you can't operate a Coast Guard "Inspected Vessel" unless under the supervision of a Captain with a Master license.

You now must obtain a TWIC (Transportation Workers Identification Credential) card in addition to your license. How much does a TWIC cost? The fee for TWIC is $132.50 and is valid for five years. Workers with current, comparable background checks will pay a reduced fee of $105.25. If workers are eligible to pay the lower price, their TWIC will expire 5 years from the date of the comparable credential (additional information is provided in the next question). The cost of a replacement TWIC, if the original is lost, stolen, or damaged, is $60.

So your total cost for the license not counting the time and expense for the on the water experience is approximately:
Captain's course $699 or $800 or $945 etc. depending on the school plus testing fee about $80
License fee $145
Drug Program $49
First Aid / CPR $60
Physical exam $100
TWIC card $132.50

Total to get license $1,265.50 - $1,511.50

Now, if you want to deliver sailboats, generally nobody will hire you to do that unless you are also ASA (American Sailing Association) certified, usually they want an Instructor certification. So you are looking at an additional $69 Instructor membership fee per year and $295 for the Basic Keelboat Instructor course. See: Become a Sailing Instructor - American Sailing Association and http://www.asa.com/pdf/asa-150_10_08.pdf

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Old 18-11-2008, 17:42   #19
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Forgive me for copying and pasting from one of my previoust post,but here you go.

I believe foreigners can get a 6 pack, meaning you could carry only up to six paying passengers on a vessel up to your tonnage level. I don't think you will qualify for a Masters License which would enable you to run a Coast Guard inspected vessel carrying more than six paying passengers up to the tonnage level of your ticket

I have made tens of thousands a year with my License but it all up to you and you may never be put in the responsible position that I was in, nor would you want to be. A Captains licence is one credential that you can always fall back on even in older age, it's better than digging ditches. I still make ten's of thousands a year with mine, but I am not your average Captain, I do lots of dangerous salvage work. Good Luck.
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Old 19-11-2008, 02:48   #20
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Excerpted from:
http://www.uscg.mil/nmc/st-info-pack...al_Package.pdf

Proof of Citizenship and Any Legal Name Change:
To obtain a Merchant Mariner’s Document (MMD), you must be a U.S. citizen or an alien “lawfully admitted to the U.S. for permanent residence.” To obtain a license, you must be a U.S. citizen except non-citizens may apply for an Operator of Uninspected Passenger Vessels (OUPV) license limited to undocumented vessels less than 5 net tons. All original license and document transactions must provide acceptable proof of nationality (i.e., original passport, birth certificate, or baptismal certificate). All subsequent applications by non-U.S. citizens (i.e., renewal, upgrade, duplicate) must provide proof of nationality and immigration status. All original license and document transactions must provide an original social security card. If your name has changed due to marriage, divorce, or a legal name change, you must provide documentation of your name change (for example, a marriage certificate, divorce decree, or judicial name change) and your current legal name.
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Old 19-11-2008, 03:18   #21
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I ran nature tours in the Everglades with a 25-ton Master's License and made about $40/trip plus tips. It was a fun job but I was on-call all of the time because I only worked when there was a trip scheduled. My best month was like $800. I got the licensce so people would call me "captain" (yeah, dumb reason) and since then have learned that the term is used VERY loosely in the boating world. Anyone coherent enough to stand at the helm is a "captain" nowadays, no matter what their experience!
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Old 20-11-2008, 10:04   #22
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An un-licensed Captain is expected to know all of the laws and regulations, i.e. "Rules of the Road," and will be held liable just like a licensed Captain for any violations or accidents.

Did you know that an un-licensed Captain is not allowed to accept money for the fuel costs of an outing?
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Old 20-11-2008, 10:39   #23
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Actually a licensed captain is held to a higher standard than an unlicensed boater. At least according to the coasties in Hawaii.
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Old 20-11-2008, 12:36   #24
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Originally Posted by Easterly-30 View Post
An un-licensed Captain is expected to know all of the laws and regulations, i.e. "Rules of the Road," and will be held liable just like a licensed Captain for any violations or accidents.

Did you know that an un-licensed Captain is not allowed to accept money for the fuel costs of an outing?
Actually, the USCG doesn't even have the term "Captain" in their licenses. I probably should have been using the term "Operator" and not "Captain" since Captain is almost a colloquial term nowadays. And yes, "Operators", licensed or otherwise, are supposed to know the rules of the road just like a person with a USCG license. Keep in mind also that just because an "Operator" is licensed, doesn't mean he is necessarily operating his boat under his license. This is to avoid the issue that a violation is considered much more serious if committed by a licensed "Operator".

Just for the record, just because an operator accepts money for fuel costs does not automatically turn the trip into a "Charter" for hire by an unlicensed operator. Unlicensed operators are given sufficient latittude for sharing the costs of operating the boat. The rules are much more strict for a licensed operator, in which case if operating under his license, accepting any kind of money can cause some problems. The average Joe on the street can accept money for fuel costs without incurring the wrath of the USCG.

I don't feel like getting into a major discussion of all the legalities, but keep in mind that a good lawyer (if there is such a thing) could probably cause problems for anyone under any circumstances if the violation was grave enough. Speaking of which... 'nuff said.
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Old 20-11-2008, 16:15   #25
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Of course a ticket does not determine competence, but it sure opens doors to employment.
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Old 20-11-2008, 16:36   #26
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Of course a ticket does not determine competence, but it sure opens doors to employment.
A USCG license assures the public of minimal competency. IAs part of the Dept of Homeland Security t's added "identity" to the requirements now as well. So you know they really are the one minimally competent. As with most occupations there is a large gap between qualifications and skill.
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Old 20-11-2008, 16:52   #27
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A USCG license assures the public of minimal competency. .
LOL... wouldn't that be nice. I knew of several new "captains" that got their license and had never even driven a boat. Back when I took the class and got my license one requirement of the class was that each student have one hour behind the helm. Yet these same people were getting masters (not six-pac) tickets.
I cannot think of one of the other new captains from my class that I would have let take my boat across Lahaina harbor let alone out with a passenger.
The US license needs to have some sort of practical test. Until then I would not say that the license "assures anyone" of any competency at all.
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Old 04-04-2009, 17:09   #28
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The lower level licenses through 100 ton are pretty much handed out. By the time you get to 1600 ton or oceans unlimited - these guys know what they're doing. Not to say they're infallible, but I've a ton of respect for these guys.
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Old 04-04-2009, 17:49   #29
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Are the USCG lower level licences STCW tickets?
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Old 04-04-2009, 19:30   #30
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CG licenses are separate. STCW is internationally recognized standards of training for merchant mariners. They are required for working on shipping traveling internationally. It's required for masters - oceans not inland or near coastal licensing.
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