Cruisers Forum
 


Join CruisersForum Today

Reply
 
Thread Tools Rate Thread Display Modes
Old 11-11-2008, 06:43   #1
Moderator Emeritus
 
David M's Avatar

Cruisers Forum Supporter

Join Date: Sep 2007
Location: San Francisco Bay
Boat: research vessel
Posts: 10,150
Would a fuel additive work?

At work one of our boats is a C-Dory with a 80 horsepower, four stroke, four cylinder carborated Yamaha ourboard. The engine recently started running on three cylinders, so I did the usual stuff to try to get it running on four cylinders. I ended up taking the engine to the local Yamaha repair shop. I was told that with the gasoline that is blended with alcohol, that when the alcohol evaporates it leaves behind a residue that causes the carbs to not function correctly. The solution I was told is to run the engine at least once a week.

Does anyone know of a fuel additive that will prevent alcohol resudue from clogging the carborators?
__________________

__________________
David

Life begins where land ends.
David M is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 11-11-2008, 07:01   #2
Registered User
 
svHyLyte's Avatar

Join Date: Mar 2006
Location: Tampa Bay area, USA
Boat: Beneteau First 42
Posts: 3,432
Images: 25
Try Star Tron Enzyme Fuel Treatment - HOME . I cannot atest to the efficacy other than to say it seems to work for us.

Futher, when taking your engine out of service for awhile, disconnect the fuel line and run the engine until it quits. Then, take the cover off and remove and empty the fuel fliter bowl and dry it with a lint free cloth. Running the engine until it stalls does not empty the fuel filter bowl which, if not emptied, will sit and accumulate water and grow bugs over the winter. Been there, done that, got the T-Shirt.

FWIW...
__________________

__________________
"It is not so much for its beauty that the Sea makes a claim upon men's hearts, as for that subtle something, that quality of air, that emanation from the waves, that so wonderfully renews a weary spirit."
svHyLyte is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 11-11-2008, 08:02   #3
Senior Cruiser
 
mikereed100's Avatar

Cruisers Forum Supporter

Join Date: Dec 2005
Location: Santa Barbara
Boat: 46' custom cat
Posts: 1,571
Images: 2
As Forest Gump says, "I'm not a smart man", but I am a little suspicious of the alcohol evaporating and leaving a residue thing. AFAIK there are dozens of highly volatile components to gasoline and I can't imagine that E-10 would evaporate off at such a higher rate as to leave residue, but again I refer you to the above quote.

Practical Sailor has an article on fuel additives this month that does not mention this problem. It does talk about the solvent effects and water absorption and separation, though. They conclude that none of the additives works all that great and that a fuel/water separator, even with outboard tanks, is a better solution. For oxidation stability and detergency they recommend Sta-bil, Star Tron and Techron.

Mike
__________________
mikereed100 is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 11-11-2008, 08:10   #4
Marine Service Provider
 
AnchorageGuy's Avatar

Join Date: Mar 2003
Location: Wherever the boat is!
Boat: Marine Trader 34DC
Posts: 4,618
Quote:
Originally Posted by svHyLyte View Post
Try Star Tron Enzyme Fuel Treatment - HOME . I cannot atest to the efficacy other than to say it seems to work for us.
Most official reports on the Star Tron say it is little more than snake oil. Some additives have an affect and some just make you feel good. I too would be a bit leery of the alcohol claim and try for a second opinion before taking any action.
__________________
Chesapeake Bay, ICW Hampton Roads To Key West, The Gulf Coast, The Bahamas

The Trawler Beach House
Voyages Of Sea Trek
AnchorageGuy is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 11-11-2008, 11:54   #5
Senior Cruiser

Cruisers Forum Supporter

Join Date: Mar 2006
Location: Nevada City. CA
Boat: Sceptre 41
Posts: 3,745
Images: 9
Quote:
Originally Posted by svHyLyte View Post
Try Star Tron Enzyme Fuel Treatment - HOME . I cannot atest to the efficacy other than to say it seems to work for us.

Futher, when taking your engine out of service for awhile, disconnect the fuel line and run the engine until it quits. Then, take the cover off and remove and empty the fuel fliter bowl and dry it with a lint free cloth. Running the engine until it stalls does not empty the fuel filter bowl which, if not emptied, will sit and accumulate water and grow bugs over the winter. Been there, done that, got the T-Shirt.

FWIW...
I always run the engine dry even if I know that we are gign to use it again the next day. The kids don't like it but I had to rebuild a carb once and din't enjoy it. Thanks for the info on the fuel filter bowl didn't even think of that. Nice thing to do when winterizing the boat.
__________________
Fair Winds,

Charlie

Between us there was, as I have already said somewhere, the bond of the sea. Besides holding our hearts together through long periods of separation, it had the effect of making us tolerant of each other's yarns -- and even convictions. Heart of Darkness
Joseph Conrad
Charlie is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 11-11-2008, 12:36   #6
Registered User
 
CaptHead's Avatar

Join Date: Jul 2008
Location: Los Angeles, CA
Boat: Grand Banks 42 Classic - Heads Up
Posts: 109
Images: 1
Send a message via Yahoo to CaptHead
Ethanol is an enemy to boats as it readily absorbs water. Take some ethanol, vodka works, and add it to gasoline. Then add some water and watch it absorb into the gas. Another problem is it eats fiberglass fuel tanks and the USCG warns about that as the residue gets into engines and destroys them. I had to change out my carb kit with a new alcohol resistant version and my engine is a 2004. I always ran it dry after use too but the alcohol ate the rubber in the carb anyway.

Good Luck!
__________________
Captain Head
1966 Grand Banks 42 Hull #17
Twin Ford Lehman Diesels
Sterling LP over Epoxy
Life is Great, Skip the Beach
CaptHead is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 11-11-2008, 13:16   #7
Moderator Emeritus
 
David M's Avatar

Cruisers Forum Supporter

Join Date: Sep 2007
Location: San Francisco Bay
Boat: research vessel
Posts: 10,150
Thanks everyone. Looks like the best thing is to run it once a week and each time disconnect the fuel hose until the engine burns the last bit of fuel.
__________________
David

Life begins where land ends.
David M is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 11-11-2008, 13:57   #8
Registered User
 
SelkirkWind's Avatar

Join Date: Jan 2008
Location: Sandpoint, ID, USA
Boat: Leopard 46, The Selkirk Grace
Posts: 73
Quote:
Originally Posted by David M View Post
Thanks everyone. Looks like the best thing is to run it once a week and each time disconnect the fuel hose until the engine burns the last bit of fuel.
That is a lot of work for a small issue. The mechanic is wrong. The issue is that varnish settles out in the jets and metering orifices from the poorly refined gasoline. I recommend Stabil Marine (BLUE not Red!). We have used it for years and never had a problem. Even Walmart carries it (about 18 dollars a bottle, but treats 4 times more gas than Red Stabil and is formulated for plastic tanks).
__________________
SelkirkWind is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 11-11-2008, 14:04   #9
Senior Cruiser
 
Therapy's Avatar

Cruisers Forum Supporter

Join Date: Jul 2007
Location: W Florida
Boat: The Jon boat still, plus a 2007 SeaCat.
Posts: 6,894
Images: 4
Quote:
Originally Posted by SelkirkWind View Post
I recommend Stabil Marine (BLUE not Red!). We have used it for years and never had a problem. Even Walmart carries it (about 18 dollars a bottle, but treats 4 times more gas than Red Stabil and is formulated for plastic tanks).
I did not know about the "blue".

Thanks.

I will look into it.
__________________
Therapy is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 11-11-2008, 20:00   #10
Ike
Registered User
 
Ike's Avatar

Join Date: Oct 2008
Location: USA
Boat: FL12 12 ft rowboat
Posts: 184
Selkirk has it right. Alcohol is a solvent and it "cleans" out all the gunk that collected in your fuel system. On older boats the gaskets in the carb may also be detiorated by alcohol. Additives may make a temporary fix, but the best thing is do a carb rebuild with newer gaskets that are alcohol resistant, clean out the jets and orifices. Also check the fuel lines. If they are more than foru or five years old replace them.
__________________
Ike
"Dont tell me I can't, tell me how I can"
Ike is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 11-11-2008, 22:23   #11
Registered User

Join Date: May 2008
Location: Galveston Bay
Boat: 32' CC Oday
Posts: 106
Startron is good juice

I started using Startron (for diesel) last year in my Westerbeke 30. The engine starts easier, doesn't smoke when cold, and runs much better.

Good article all should read it. I worked 10 years for Mobil Oil Refinery and this information is consistent with what I think I know...

<<The Side-Effects of Ethanol
The first problems encountered with transitioning to E10 is the loosening of sludge from the fuel tanks. Ethanol is a very effective solvent and it will attack varnish, gum, and resins: the sludge that can build up in fuel tanks. Once cleaned off the fuel tank walls this build up leads to poor performance and frequently clogged fuel filters and injectors. The enzymes in Star Tron® will safely break down and disperse this sludge. After a filter change or two the fuel tanks will be clean and boaters can move on the next, more serious, ethanol related issue…
Understanding Phase Separation
Ethanol has a great affinity for water, and will attract moisture from the atmosphere through the vented lines of a marine fuel tank. The water molecules form an electro-chemical bond with the ethanol that is stronger than the fuel’s original bond with the ethanol. Water is heavier then gas so the water/ethanol molecule is dragged to the bottom of the tank and separates from the more buoyant fuel molecules. This is referred to as phase separation and occurs when the water content in the fuel reaches roughly .5%. Ethanol provides a significant boost to the octane rating of the fuel, so when phase separation occurs you end up with a corrosive water/ethanol layer on the bottom of the tank, under what is now substandard fuel.>>



Dealing with E-10 Ethanol Gasoline in a Marine Environment with StarTron
__________________

__________________
"You do not ask a tame seagull why it needs to disappear from time to time toward the open sea. It goes, that's all."

Bernard Moitessier
BassAckwards is offline   Reply With Quote
Reply

Tags
fuel

Thread Tools
Display Modes Rate This Thread
Rate This Thread:

Posting Rules
You may not post new threads
You may not post replies
You may not post attachments
You may not edit your posts

BB code is On
Smilies are On
[IMG] code is On
HTML code is Off
Trackbacks are Off
Pingbacks are Off
Refbacks are Off


Similar Threads
Thread Thread Starter Forum Replies Last Post
Could this work? stoupidmonkey Off Topic Forum 14 11-11-2008 09:02
Penetrol, the wonder additive cat man do Construction, Maintenance & Refit 5 14-07-2008 13:38
Fuel Additive Bear Essentials Powered Boats 1 07-04-2008 14:44
ispell won't work rsn48 Forum Tech Support & Site Help 1 02-04-2006 14:39
Things that work GordMay Forum Tech Support & Site Help 1 03-05-2003 21:05



Copyright 2002- Social Knowledge, LLC All Rights Reserved.

All times are GMT -7. The time now is 06:33.


Google+
Powered by vBulletin® Version 3.8.8 Beta 1
Copyright ©2000 - 2017, vBulletin Solutions, Inc.
Social Knowledge Networks
Powered by vBulletin® Version 3.8.8 Beta 1
Copyright ©2000 - 2017, vBulletin Solutions, Inc.

ShowCase vBulletin Plugins by Drive Thru Online, Inc.