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Old 09-10-2013, 11:01   #31
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Re: Newbie with questions, I have a lot to learn, I know.

Another question, what do you guys/gals think about buying an inexpensive, well built and taken care of older boat and buying a new engine for it. I have no idea how much a new engine is and how much it would cost to have it put in. I could not do this myself. Like, maybe find something for around $30,000-$40,000 and have a new engine put in?
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Old 09-10-2013, 11:07   #32
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Re: Newbie with questions, I have a lot to learn, I know.

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Boats for what you have in mind can (don't have to be) pretty complex and I'd suggest you start educating yourself on the structure and systems involved.
Beebe's book is terrific but very outdated. Suggest you start with Marine Survey 101.

FWIW, there's a new 4th Edition of Voyaging Under Power just out recently. Major rewrite/update.

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Old 09-10-2013, 11:12   #33
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Re: Newbie with questions, I have a lot to learn, I know.

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Another question, what do you guys/gals think about buying an inexpensive, well built and taken care of older boat and buying a new engine for it. I have no idea how much a new engine is and how much it would cost to have it put in. I could not do this myself. Like, maybe find something for around $30,000-$40,000 and have a new engine put in?

Not out of the question, but if you spend $30-40K and then repower, the boat will still be worth only about $30-40K on the market (excepting special circumstance), even if it is more valuable in your own eyes.

A previous dock neighbor repowered an '80s 33 or 35 twin gas Bertram (good brand, goo dboat as far as I could tell) sportfish with twin Cummins diesels. Including the new diesel genset and some coincidental head updating, the tab was about $110K. Since then, they've listed it for sale at $125K and haven't gotten offers from qualified buyers...

Might be more cost-effective to find an affordable good boat with diesels -- and then do a major overhaul right up front -- though. Again, it depends.

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Old 09-10-2013, 11:47   #34
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Re: Newbie with questions, I have a lot to learn, I know.

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I assume you mean periods of no wind? Isn't that the reason some sailboats also have a motor? After looking at pictures of the insides of sailboats, I think I may be more of a power boat guy. More room for me the better although I envy true sailors as that seems to be "true freedom". I will always be slave to some consistant income.



I'll definitely have something small as well. Maybe a rowable dinghy but with a motor.



I plan on doing just that. I am researching now, 5 years before I can even think about buying. Didn't know about charter shows and fests. Thank you! I'll definitely be looking into those.


Actually, most sailboats have motors to get them in and out of their berth. You CAN run the motor day and night (a diesel woul love that), but you won't go much over 6 knots on most boats, which is very slow, and when you're becalmed it's also ... HOT.


Sailboats just don't make good motorboats.

You can put out the headsail and use the apparent wind -- the air appears to be moving when you motor, just as you feel wind on your face on a calm day on your bicycle -- but you really won't move very fast, and occasionally those becalmed areas are pretty big.

You don't want a sailboat with an outboard motor as power for ocean use.

I agree with the person who said to charter both (you'll have to convince the charter operator that you know how to sail though, or take a sailor with you).

But hands down the motorized boat will go faster and you'll have more living space. You actually may have less storage on a smaller motorboat but with a little creative carpentry you may be able to significantly improve that.

You will have more options for riding out a storm on a sailboat than in many motor boats, but if you pay attention to the weather you will miss most (not all) storms.
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Old 09-10-2013, 12:32   #35
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Re: Newbie with questions, I have a lot to learn, I know.

Most yacht clubs have several race nights per week and are almost always looking for crew. There is no better place to learn sailing but you must have a thick skin and ear plugs might help, some of those guys take it very seriously
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Old 09-10-2013, 13:11   #36
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Re: Newbie with questions, I have a lot to learn, I know.

Aloha and welcome aboard!
I think most of us here have gone through this thought process. My first real boating experiences were on Navy ships and boats were used to get to and from them when anchored or moored. I thought I wanted a power boat.
That was before I learned how to sail. Once I took sailing lessons (which I highly recommend that you do) I was hooked on sailing and sailboats and never ever thought I'd ever go back to thinking about powerboats. My experience is that the on the water activity time of sailing costs peanuts versus powerboating. Your local Power Squadron and USCG Auxiliary offer very inexpensive boating classes and most local sailing/yacht clubs offer sailing classes. In my opinion that's the best way to learn and you don't have to commit to boat ownership. Who knows? You may not like it.
I am so cheap that just driving my truck that gets 22mpg versus my car that gets 39mpg makes me jittery. I take the car as much as I can because of it. That makes me a sailboater using wind versus a powerboater using fossil fuel for certain.
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Old 09-10-2013, 21:11   #37
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Re: Newbie with questions, I have a lot to learn, I know.

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Aloha and welcome aboard!
I think most of us here have gone through this thought process. My first real boating experiences were on Navy ships and boats were used to get to and from them when anchored or moored. I thought I wanted a power boat.
That was before I learned how to sail. Once I took sailing lessons (which I highly recommend that you do) I was hooked on sailing and sailboats and never ever thought I'd ever go back to thinking about powerboats. My experience is that the on the water activity time of sailing costs peanuts versus powerboating. Your local Power Squadron and USCG Auxiliary offer very inexpensive boating classes and most local sailing/yacht clubs offer sailing classes. In my opinion that's the best way to learn and you don't have to commit to boat ownership. Who knows? You may not like it.
I am so cheap that just driving my truck that gets 22mpg versus my car that gets 39mpg makes me jittery. I take the car as much as I can because of it. That makes me a sailboater using wind versus a powerboater using fossil fuel for certain.
Gosh! You guys are making me rethink this entire thing! Now I am thinking maybe a catamaran. Sail and engine, best of both worlds. Not crazy about their general layout but might be worth it. I looked around YachtWorld.com just to get a general impression and found it's difficult to find something in my price range ($60,000-$80,000) that 40 foot or more and made in the 1980's or newer, not that I am anywhere close to buying now. Not many on the market either. Ayone know a top speed for them? What does this forum think of cats in general?
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Old 09-10-2013, 21:45   #38
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Re: Newbie with questions, I have a lot to learn, I know.

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As you've noted, 2 months income for 9 months is doable. I'd even have another extra months income and all the income during the 9 months. Seems easily doable. I'll just make sure I have a decent nestegg for the "surprises".
Remember that that 779 gallons covered about 4,800 miles (1.2gph at 7 knots). If you are based in Florida and go island hopping staying a few weeks of a few months in one place at a time that amount of fuel could last a few years.
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Old 10-10-2013, 05:13   #39
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Re: Newbie with questions, I have a lot to learn, I know.

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Gosh! You guys are making me rethink this entire thing! Now I am thinking maybe a catamaran. Sail and engine, best of both worlds. Not crazy about their general layout but might be worth it. I looked around YachtWorld.com just to get a general impression and found it's difficult to find something in my price range ($60,000-$80,000) that 40 foot or more and made in the 1980's or newer, not that I am anywhere close to buying now. Not many on the market either. Ayone know a top speed for them? What does this forum think of cats in general?

Search for models up to $200K. Essentially you're looking for boat models you like, that could work... and sometimes the only example that happens to be for sale at any given time is maybe newer than what you can afford. Once you home in on brands/models/layouts... you can work the details about model years and price later. That could include waiting until an affordable candidate comes on the market, negotiating on price, etc.

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Old 10-10-2013, 05:48   #40
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Re: Newbie with questions, I have a lot to learn, I know.

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Gosh! You guys are making me rethink this entire thing! Now I am thinking maybe a catamaran. Sail and engine, best of both worlds. Not crazy about their general layout but might be worth it. I looked around YachtWorld.com just to get a general impression and found it's difficult to find something in my price range ($60,000-$80,000) that 40 foot or more and made in the 1980's or newer, not that I am anywhere close to buying now. Not many on the market either. Ayone know a top speed for them? What does this forum think of cats in general?

trimaran.
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Old 10-10-2013, 06:17   #41
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Re: Newbie with questions, I have a lot to learn, I know.

[QUOTE Ayone know a top speed for them? What does this forum think of cats in general?[/QUOTE]
Don't ask the forum about Cats vs Monos, it is like asking what anchor or guns or no guns it may open the can of worms!!!!!!!!!!!!!
BUT we general can get 50-70% of the wind speed, if the wind is a bit forward of the beam a strong 75% of wind. Weight and other factors greatly effect performance, we are VERY HEAVY, as we live aboard. I still blame the weight on my wife's shoes
There are few on the market because, once you get one you tend to keep them, and they hold their value well. If you want check our blog for more info
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Old 10-10-2013, 11:51   #42
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Re: Newbie with questions, I have a lot to learn, I know.

SpeedsterXTake some boating education classes during your 5 year waiting period. The U.S. Power Squadron and the USCG Auxiliary both offer a range of courses in boating safety, navigation, piloting, communications, seamanship and other useful skills. A big advantage to attending the courses is meeting other boaters and learning from them. Also think about chartering a boat, sail or power, to familiarize yourself with the pros and cons of both. Lots cheaper than buying a boat you ultimately will not be happy with. This time will also help you decide where you ultimately want to cruise - offshore, day trips in the sound, or something like the Great Loop, which can take up to a year.
Good luck on your dream.
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Old 10-10-2013, 21:14   #43
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Re: Newbie with questions, I have a lot to learn, I know.

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SpeedsterXTake some boating education classes during your 5 year waiting period. The U.S. Power Squadron and the USCG Auxiliary both offer a range of courses in boating safety, navigation, piloting, communications, seamanship and other useful skills. A big advantage to attending the courses is meeting other boaters and learning from them. Also think about chartering a boat, sail or power, to familiarize yourself with the pros and cons of both. Lots cheaper than buying a boat you ultimately will not be happy with. This time will also help you decide where you ultimately want to cruise - offshore, day trips in the sound, or something like the Great Loop, which can take up to a year.
Good luck on your dream.
I will do just that, I have plenty of time to learn. My only problem is that I live in northern Indiana but not too far from Lake Michigan so I think I can find something there to help me learn. I am fairly sure what kind of boater that I see myself wanting to be. At this point I think I want to have a home base off of the Florida coast but make a few trips a year that lasts a month or two long to the keys, Bahama's and the USVI's although now that you guys have me thinking more and more about sailing, if I did get a decent Catamaran and learn to have the balls to cross the Atlantic, would love to cruise the Med.
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Old 10-10-2013, 22:12   #44
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Re: Newbie with questions, I have a lot to learn, I know.

So, exactly why are you looking at catamarans now?

Just a question to see if I can follow your thinking process. No way criticism.

Go to a few boat shows if you can find them near enough. Look at the options. Talk with people who own boats.
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Old 10-10-2013, 23:30   #45
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That's a fair question, I read a book about a man and his wife buying a powerboat and living on it. I lived in North Carolina for summer and lived on a boat that never left the marina, I rented it like an apartment. That always got me to thinking about living on a boat. After I read the book I got the fever. I didn't know all the options and all the in and outs about doing what I wanted to do but Since I've been researching this I found that sailing would get me further with less expense.

I am now thinking that with education for a few years sailing maybe I can become comfortable enough to actually go beyond my dreams of just exploring The Caribbean and maybe if I have enough gumption I could explore the world. At this point in my research I don't see myself ever not having a motor, that just makes me have a feeling of safety and control. I mean once you start thinking about it why wouldn't you want to have the best of both worlds. That's why I've started thinking about the catamaran.

I'll be honest though I have no idea what I'll end up with in six years from now but I do know that I want to be on a boat in the tropics living a life of freedom and palm trees. I'll be 55 by the time I can even start this journey but I have six years from now to get ready and this forum and you guys have been great start.
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