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Old 19-09-2009, 17:23   #1
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Need Help Picking the Right Trawler for Me

I am looking for a live aboard trawler for just me but with room for kids and grand kids to stay weekends. I would also like to mosey on down south or up to New England in the summer. I think I want a 38 to 40 ft. trawler.
I have seen or am scheduled to see:
1. 38 Marine Trader 1986
2. 40 Pilgrim 1989 -may need more work than is apparent
3. 3807 Carver 1986 -gas
4. 38 President Senator 1980ish
5. 38 or 40 ft Gulfstar 1980ish also
And a few more that at the moment do not come to mind.
I would like single deisel, but...

I have never had or used a power boat, and the only place I have sailed is the Chesapeake Bay and its tributaries.
I believe I can handle a boat this size by myself and am certainly willing to try but I could use some input and reviews from experienced sailors, especially ones that are not my broker.
Thank you in advance.
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Old 19-09-2009, 19:12   #2
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A neighbor has a President. It's probably the right amount of boat for a trawler. His was a 1979. Another neighbor has a Senator so the two are comparable. One is single screw with a double cabin and dual station. The other is a Sportfish with an upper station only and twin turbo Ford Leymans. Sort of depends on if you fish much or not. They both do grand kids so that part seems to fit. The 37 to 40 range is probably the right amount of boat for what you want if on a budget. The 42 or 48 Krogen would be a whole lot more money too.

Twin screws will handle better though with practice single screw is OK too. Backing into the slip with a single and cross wind takes time. The twin screws with a turbo charge will burn more diesel when running in turbo, but you get extra power too when you need it. Staying under the turbo heps though fuel is not the big ticket item.

I would say in all the cases expect to do a fair amount of refitting once you go beyond the obvious. Tanks and engines might need work you can't see easily. For the Bay these boats are pretty economical and fit the bill most all the time. The days these boats can't do well you don't want to be out there. We are on the southern end of the Bay where the water is a lot bigger. Neighbors have even gone up the Jersey shore and done the Hudson River and places you can get to from there picking the weather close.

Going outside with any of these is a very serious move as none of them really are made for it and lack stabilizers. I suggest in this price range look them over, forget about gasoline, and pick the one in the best shape. There will be surprises so hold back a lot of money on it. Pay for an engine survey with anything that has more than one engine - period. Gensets would also be something that should already be installed and also needs to be checked out too. Don't get a boat without a hydraulic auto pilot. The Simrad AP11 was popular then and is a good choice but there are others. Watch out for toy windlass and undersized ground tackle. Too many were never anchored.
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Old 20-09-2009, 08:16   #3
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more help please

EEK, I do not want to stay in the Bay. I never want to load a Uhaul again, I don't even want to pack a suitcase, and I am tired of sleeping on my son's couch.
I guess my Broker is trying to look out for me. An inexperienced, single, middle aged woman could get into some trouble if she ventured too far.

Alright, now that I have calmed down, any suggestions for a liveaboard, cruise the East Coast, and maybe some tropical hideaways type boat?

Landlord is selling house in, well, I guess it depends on the housing market and who would buy a house flooded by Isabel. So I am not sure of my time line. I just know I need to breathe and declare independence ASAP.

Thanks for the great advise. I printed it out to carry with me in my search.
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Old 20-09-2009, 09:32   #4
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Buy one with a small engine and start saving the planet!

Or better still, buy a sailboat!
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Old 20-09-2009, 09:52   #5
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green as I can

I wish I could do sails but left arm does not work well and I am all alone. I do plan on refitting every thing I can with energy efficient workings and plan on incorporating solar power as a source of energy.
If smaller engine is possible for what I want, please let me know which ones I should be looking for. I am a complete novice and open to suggestions.
Thanks for caring about the earth!
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Old 20-09-2009, 10:30   #6
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Have you never heard of single handed sailors? lol

I am 49 years old and have been working with, on and around boats since I was 16. This career has taken me around the world. I have met single handed sailors, single legged sailors and sailors with no legs.

These days there are many devices that help sailors handle sails easily, we have roller reefing fore sails, in mast roller reefing main sails, electric winches, electric windlasses and auto steering devices called autohelms. The only time you need to handle a line is to tie up to a dock. Motor boats still need to tie up to docks!

These days I am very much an enviromentalist and believe that a 'green world' is the only way to go! So please do some research with sailboat manufacturers and marine stores etc about 'about devices that would enable you to turn off that stinking oil guzzling noise machine below decks and harness the wind that has been given to us for free!

Perhaps you might consider buying a motor sailor? that way, when you are 'single handed' you could use it as a motor cruiser but when you have some 'able bodied' crew around then you can sail for free!

have a look at a Fisher 48. Go to New and Used Yachts for Sale - YachtWorld.com and type fisher into the search box. The fisher is a 60/40 motor sailor with around about 80hp diesel inboard. 60/40 means that this one is 60 % motor and 40% sail. This means that it motors better than it sails and in most light airs you would need to motor as well as sail or just motor. One of the greatest advantages of having a sail up while you motor is that is cuts out any rolling that a pure motor boat gives you. It also gets you that 'get you home' ability should you have engine problems, as well as fuel efficiency.

However if you are determined to buy a motor boat, remember this, the faster you want to go, the more fuel it will use! My Mother has an 82 Sunseeker Predator. It does 35 knots. It does 350 miles per tank of fuel. it takes 6,000 litres of fuel to fill the tank up!! You can rent this boat in the Med for $80,000 a week. But you won't be my friend!

The smaller the engine, the less speed you will have, the less fuel you will use. the less it will cost you...and the world!

George
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Old 20-09-2009, 10:37   #7
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Alexa,
I have a sailboat but did own a 40 foot trawler in my earlier years. It was a Ocean Alexander and had a fwd and aft cabin, two heads, and a real sweet galley. Loved the boat, had about 1500 mile range but never took her anywhere so can't tell you how she handles the sea. If ya go with a single (which would be cheaper to buy and maintain) I would recommend a bow thruster, mine did not and docking in any wind was too exciting for this gal.
You will find your boat, keep the faith
Erika
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Old 20-09-2009, 10:45   #8
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Sorry forgot to say:
Be sure to check the deck of the Island Trader, they have soft deck issues ( I'm not trying to steer you away from the traders - I like em). I had to inject the decks of my trawler, it was an easy job and she needed a fresh coat of paint anyways.
Cheers,
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Old 20-09-2009, 10:49   #9
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Get a single diesel with bow thrusters to help you "park"

Try and stay under 40 feet.

As a woman here are a few features that you wannna think about.

Galley...make sure its functional with good storage.

Head, make sure it has a large enough sealed tight shower, or you will be showering in the marina public restrooms.

Most likely you wont be doing as much traveling as you think so find a marina with really nice people and good security.

When its time for any kind of repairs, shop around....and pay by the job not the hour.

Learn as much as you can about doing things yourself.

Lastly, this is true BOAT = Bring On Another Thousand

We are constantly dumping money into our boat, but its well worth it.
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Old 20-09-2009, 11:09   #10
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What is your price range?

A boat to safely cruise tropical hideaways will be way more expensive than one that can safely cruise the east coast and one that stays in the ICW and doesn't go outside could be less expensive still.
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Old 20-09-2009, 12:16   #11
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here are some more details

I have two months off in the summer to go places. Son is expecting to be stationed in Providence RI, daughter is near coast of NC. And I am an explorer thru and thru.
I would like to spend <150,000 in order to have $$$$ to spend on fixing her.
I do not want her too big, a slip would get to be expensive and I am not sure I could handle her. She has to be well organized because I will be using her as my primary residence, so room for family visits is a must. I expect her, in 9 years, to be my retirement home.
A small engine is fine. I have no desire to hurry anywhere. I will make sure she has bow thrusters if she is a single engine deisel, which I hope she will be.
I would get a motorsailor if they fit the above criteria and I could physically check them out before offering to buy. There seem to be only a few for sale on the east coast.
As you can see I am still looking for advise. I am a true newbie.
Thank all of you for your help and suggestions!
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Old 20-09-2009, 18:34   #12
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If you are going to be running the boat by yourself, look for a boat that is easy to get around on deck to make docking less of a fire drill. A single screw sounds good but twin screws make docking much, much easier, even compared to a single screw with a bow thruster. I have a 35-foot single diesel boat that is easy to manage and I am a fairly experienced boater but even so I find docking can be nerve-wracking when I am running the boat alone.

I might suggest looking at a smaller but newer boat than the 1980's boats you are pondering. Really old boats can drive you crazy with breakdowns and mechanical/electrical gremlins. Perhaps look at a Mainship 34 Mk II or II, or even a Mainship 390 or similar. The wiring and plumbing systems will likely be better than a Taiwanese boat from the 1980's like a Marine Trader, and you are less likely to come across serious leaks and delaminating problems. Try to find the smallest boat that you can live on comfortably, not a boat with extra cabins for grandkids. Let the grandkids sleep on floor mattresses rather than you coping with a big, expensive, unwieldy trawler.

If you are not looking for speed, you may want to look at a 36 foot Krogen Manatee. They are well built, easy to run, and immensely practical. Single screw, cruise at about 6 knots. If you go with a single screw boat, consider adding a stern thruster in addition to the bow thruster. Then docking will be a doddle -- no problem in almost any situation.
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Old 21-09-2009, 02:19   #13
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Thanks for the advise. I am reseaching everthing you all say. I just went to yachtworld and checked out the Krogen and the Mainship 34 and 390. The Krogen is small but not too small. They claim she is "sea worthy". I can not afford a new one, they have some out there from the 1980's also. Would I have as much of a problem with the Krogen as the others?
The Mainship 34 is too small. The Mainship 390 is fine, not crazy about the layout but could be doable. I could not find anything about her being "sea worthy". There is one I can afford from 1999, which is a little worrisome to me.

This may sound unreasonable, but I will be living aboard and I teach and I would like to have a separate dinette area to keep my school work separated from my living space.
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Old 21-09-2009, 11:06   #14
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While at it take a look at a few power catamaran "trawler types". Those in the 34' to 40' range may very well be something of interest. You should be able to find some within your price range although probably at the top end.

Interior room should be sufficient, no need for flopper stoppers, stabilizers, or bow thrusters. And, although probably not appropriate for doing ocean crossings they would be find for hopping down to the Caribbean.
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Old 22-09-2009, 01:26   #15
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Did you check out the Krogen Manatee 36? It is my dream trawler.

Mike
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