Cruisers Forum
 


Join CruisersForum Today

Reply
 
Thread Tools Rate Thread Display Modes
Old 05-03-2013, 18:52   #1
Registered User

Join Date: Mar 2013
Posts: 2
Motion at Anchor

First off hello everyone, I'm totally new to this site but looking forward to reaping the benefits of other peoples experience.

In a nutshell, my wife and I are thinking of buying a powered boat, probably around 45ft, flybridge, twin engine, around 10 years old. We are looking at Princess, Fairline or Sealine. We would live on the boat for maybe 5 or 6 months a year in a tropical location (SE Asia). Both of us have several years experience on sail boats, again around the 45ft mark. We have very little experience on motor cruisers.

My questions is, compared to a sailboat, what is the motion of a similar sized motor cruiser like at anchor?

Thanks.
__________________

__________________
James59 is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 05-03-2013, 20:14   #2
Registered User

Join Date: Nov 2011
Location: Montegut LA.
Boat: Now we need to get her to Louisiana !! she's ours
Posts: 3,421
Re: Motion at Anchor

Worse then either a Mono or a Cat, but the different motion can be cured with a steading sail or set of para vanes on each side ! Para vanes work the better of the two. Also some styles have been know to sail around a bit! some large cockpit boats sail a bunch, and without proper anchoring equipment have been known twist there anchors up and drag !! Ive spent many nights at anchor with both power boats and Mono hulls, and prefer the mono any day ! just my 2 cents
__________________

__________________
Bob and Connie
bobconnie is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 06-03-2013, 06:07   #3
Registered User

Join Date: Feb 2008
Posts: 371
Re: Motion at Anchor

I think the answer depends partly on the hull design of the power vessel. If you get a deep hull displacement vessel with a keel (or twin bilge keels) you get closer to the action of a sailboat. We do not usually get the "sailing around" effect with our Selene 47 (5.75ft draft). As you get to "flatter" bottoms in planing or semi displacement vessels they tend to "sit' on top of the water and are much more prone to the wind/wave action at anchor.
__________________
chrisjs is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 06-03-2013, 06:19   #4
Moderator Emeritus
 
GordMay's Avatar

Join Date: Mar 2003
Location: Thunder Bay, Ontario - 48-29N x 89-20W
Boat: (Cruiser Living On Dirt)
Posts: 31,579
Images: 240
Re: Motion at Anchor

Greetings and welcome aboard the CF, James.
__________________
Gord May
"If you didn't have the time or money to do it right in the first place, when will you get the time/$ to fix it?"



GordMay is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 06-03-2013, 06:50   #5
Registered User

Join Date: Jul 2006
Posts: 3,949
Re: Motion at Anchor

A lot depends on the particular boat, and it goes without saying it depends on the harbor. In a well-sheltered harbor almost anything would be comfortable. I don't know if it is an option on the boats you are looking at, but I have found on sailboats, catamarans, and trawler yachts having a snubber line led from a bow eye down near the waterline can greatly reduce yawing at anchor, and reduces the amount of chain you put out to have adequate scope. With the high bow and high position of the bow roller on typical power craft they are prone to blowing around a lot at anchor, putting the boat at various angles to the waves in the harbor. If you can keep the bow pointed into the wind powercraft can be very comfortable. On the other hand, if the seas are coming in at an angle to the wind you can get a very uncomfortable snap roll at anchor.
__________________
Kettlewell Cruising
Kettlewell is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 06-03-2013, 09:31   #6
Registered User
 
svHyLyte's Avatar

Join Date: Mar 2006
Location: Tampa Bay area, USA
Boat: Beneteau First 42
Posts: 3,432
Images: 25
Re: Motion at Anchor

Quote:
Originally Posted by James59 View Post
First off hello everyone, I'm totally new to this site but looking forward to reaping the benefits of other peoples experience.

In a nutshell, my wife and I are thinking of buying a powered boat, probably around 45ft, flybridge, twin engine, around 10 years old. We are looking at Princess, Fairline or Sealine. We would live on the boat for maybe 5 or 6 months a year in a tropical location (SE Asia). Both of us have several years experience on sail boats, again around the 45ft mark. We have very little experience on motor cruisers.

My questions is, compared to a sailboat, what is the motion of a similar sized motor cruiser like at anchor?

Thanks.
We have sat comfortably at anchor and watched nearby motor boats roll their guts out as they just don't have the Moment of Inertia of a sailing yacht. The cure is outriggers and "flopper stoppers" or, to a lesser extent, a riding sail that can be rigged from even a vestigial signals/flag mast as one commonly sees on Trawler type yachts.

FWIW...
__________________
"It is not so much for its beauty that the Sea makes a claim upon men's hearts, as for that subtle something, that quality of air, that emanation from the waves, that so wonderfully renews a weary spirit."
svHyLyte is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 10-03-2013, 03:44   #7
Registered User

Join Date: Mar 2013
Posts: 2
Re: Motion at Anchor

Thanks for the replies everyone.
__________________
James59 is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 12-03-2013, 00:30   #8
Registered User
 
markpierce's Avatar

Join Date: Aug 2010
Location: Central California
Boat: M/V Carquinez Coot
Posts: 3,413
Re: Motion at Anchor

Boats will all "roll." Best to have living spaces close to the center of rotation
(near the waterline).



(The ketch on the left if violating instructions by not being bow-oriented toward the cove's entrance. Boats are moored fore and aft.)
__________________
markpierce is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 12-03-2013, 00:42   #9
Registered User
 
markpierce's Avatar

Join Date: Aug 2010
Location: Central California
Boat: M/V Carquinez Coot
Posts: 3,413
Re: Motion at Anchor

Most "cruising" motorboats have living spaces above the engine room, thus well above the boats' waterline. There are exceptions; however, for instance:

__________________
markpierce is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 17-03-2013, 15:27   #10
Registered User

Join Date: Jun 2008
Location: seattle
Boat: Devlin 48 Moon River,j/100 BJ
Posts: 586
Re: Motion at Anchor

If you are doing a boat from scratch put a 7-10kw gen set and a small gyroscope in it then no rolly and no problem.
__________________
eyschulman is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 19-03-2013, 03:06   #11
Marine Service Provider
 
beachbum29's Avatar

Join Date: Oct 2012
Posts: 106
Quote:
Originally Posted by markpierce View Post
Boats will all "roll." Best to have living spaces close to the center of rotation
(near the waterline).

(The ketch on the left if violating instructions by not being bow-oriented toward the cove's entrance. Boats are moored fore and aft.)
What is it violating?
beachbum29 is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 19-03-2013, 08:35   #12
Registered User
 
Jimbo485's Avatar

Join Date: May 2010
Location: some ocean down under
Boat: Kelsall Suncat 40
Posts: 1,247
Re: Motion at Anchor

Quote:
Originally Posted by beachbum29 View Post
What is it violating?
Instructions, apparently.
__________________

Jimbo485 is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 19-03-2013, 09:03   #13
Registered User
 
sww914's Avatar

Join Date: May 2009
Location: Punta De Mita
Boat: Vagabond 39 Hull # 1
Posts: 1,842
Re: Motion at Anchor

I've never anchored a powerboat but I will tell you that setting a bow & stern anchor is just great. When everyone else is flopping around, we're just riding out the waves, pointed right into them.
Of course, this requires a large anchorage or one that everybody anchors bow & stern.
__________________
Steve
http://www.landfallvoyages.com
sww914 is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 19-03-2013, 09:15   #14
Marine Service Provider
 
beachbum29's Avatar

Join Date: Oct 2012
Posts: 106
Quote:
Originally Posted by Jimbo485 View Post

Instructions, apparently.
From who?
beachbum29 is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 19-03-2013, 10:08   #15
Registered User
 
markpierce's Avatar

Join Date: Aug 2010
Location: Central California
Boat: M/V Carquinez Coot
Posts: 3,413
Re: Motion at Anchor

The CA state park system.

Unfortunately, the fore-and-aft mooring system is laid out crosswise to the tidal currents, but then the wakes do mostly come from the cove's entrance.
__________________

__________________
markpierce is offline   Reply With Quote
Reply

Tags
anchor

Thread Tools
Display Modes Rate This Thread
Rate This Thread:

Posting Rules
You may not post new threads
You may not post replies
You may not post attachments
You may not edit your posts

BB code is On
Smilies are On
[IMG] code is On
HTML code is Off
Trackbacks are Off
Pingbacks are Off
Refbacks are Off




Copyright 2002- Social Knowledge, LLC All Rights Reserved.

All times are GMT -7. The time now is 13:55.


Google+
Powered by vBulletin® Version 3.8.8 Beta 1
Copyright ©2000 - 2017, vBulletin Solutions, Inc.
Social Knowledge Networks
Powered by vBulletin® Version 3.8.8 Beta 1
Copyright ©2000 - 2017, vBulletin Solutions, Inc.

ShowCase vBulletin Plugins by Drive Thru Online, Inc.