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Old 07-07-2013, 18:15   #16
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Re: Fiberglass and International Travel

Ok sometimes the most improbable ill conceived transoceanic ventures work despite the odds. With five kids in the balance and an inexperienced somewhat clueless skipper in charge of their future I wish them good luck and hope that GG is a fast learner and a very capable individual. Just wondering is GG running toward something or away?
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Old 07-07-2013, 20:02   #17
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Re: Fiberglass and International Travel

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Originally Posted by europaflyer View Post
+1 +1 +1 +1

I tried to persuade GG of this on her custom boat thread... not interested. Sometimes you can see the accident waiting to happen, and you just know the person is so set on their course that no amount of advice will help them!

GalaxyGirl, people here can see that if you don't know what material you want your boat to be built from then it's a bit worrying that you seem to be about to buy a 70' powerboat. I read your seasickness blog post with interest. No, I don't think taking your kids out on a high speed powerboat for half an hour in calm water is a great seasickness test, for reasons that you should already know if you're on the point of buying a massive boat and moving your family aboard! Neither is going out on a big tourist boat, and you would realise this if you knew how boats worked. It is sort of in the mind, but not in the way you think. I can tell you, I was really surprised the first time I got seasick, which sort of explains how positive my mindset was - and it didn't help a bit! One of the best ways of preventing/dealing with seasickness does, I suppose, work 'mentally' - but it's not the sort of 'I won't get seasick' brain game stuff you're thinking of. Get on the water and you will realise that staying busy is one of the best things to do. Good luck trying to keep 5 kids busy on a big powerboat (no sails to play with) which you can't handle yourself (hired skipper doing all the stuff for you).

As we keep trying to tell you, experience is key here. You can't learn about this from the internet. Buy a weeks powerboating course on a boat around the 40' mark. Experience some rough weather. Experience some tricky situations. Get to know what living on a boat is like for you and your kids. Once you've done that, get back to us. Until then, you're just sounding a bit silly and naive. Unless this is all an elaborate troll... i'm beginning to wonder... surely there isn't anyone out there foolish enough to think they can set out on a new life on a boat without having spent any time with their family at sea!
Life is waaayyyy to short to do things the way others think they should be done or the way everyone else does them.
Never have been one to follow the status quo
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Old 07-07-2013, 20:08   #18
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Re: Fiberglass and International Travel

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Way I see it, either it'll work out great for them or it'll make for an amazing deal on a 70' powerboat for someone down the road. I agree with the sail vs power thing though, I can't imagine being confined inside a powerboat for weeks at a time with nothing to do but watch the chart plotter. That's basically prison, isn't it?
But who says we will be confined for weeks at a time?

I'll have 5 kids aboard. Short jaunts. Frequent stays. It will be fine.
I can't imagine the space constraints on a sailboat.
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Old 07-07-2013, 20:12   #19
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Re: Fiberglass and International Travel

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Originally Posted by eyschulman View Post
. Just wondering is GG running toward something or away?
Eyschulman,
Are you a cruiser?
Are any of you here cruisers?
Why do you cruise?
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Old 07-07-2013, 20:22   #20
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Re: Fiberglass and International Travel

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Originally Posted by GalaxyGirl View Post
Eyschulman,
Are you a cruiser?
Are any of you here cruisers?
Why do you cruise?
Masochists, the lot of them.
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Old 07-07-2013, 20:33   #21
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Re: Fiberglass and International Travel

GG I have spent a lot of time on boats including north Atlantic on a CG cutter and some live aboard cruising 6 months per year along mid Atlantic coast. I now spend my summers doing the northwest waters but I am definitely land based with roots. I don't think its about the life stile you seek but more about why you want to dive off a cliff into murky unknown waters without what I would consider reasonable preparation. Yes you can gain knowledge on the net but not enough and not the kind that will replace experience. You are here on the net either to learn or get advice or both. The best advice I can give you is little steps first.
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Old 07-07-2013, 21:49   #22
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Re: Fiberglass and International Travel

Quote:
Originally Posted by GalaxyGirl View Post
But who says we will be confined for weeks at a time?

I'll have 5 kids aboard. Short jaunts. Frequent stays. It will be fine.
I can't imagine the space constraints on a sailboat.
GG... We cruised for 33 months through Mexico and Central America on a 47 foot sailboat and lived on it 4.5 years before we left.

Sometimes it felt really, really small. You will also find that your five kids can't go out in the backyard to play, which will further make the boat feel smaller.

You should really think about some chartering first to make sure this is for you. Spend a couple of weeks on a boat with your kids... It is not the same as a weekend on a friends boat.

As for steel or fiberglass? That is a personal preference that most sailors choose based on their familiarity with the vessel. Most people I know with steel boats grew up on them or were in the steel/welding trades. Recreational steel boats for the most part are a labor of love, although there are a lot in Europe, you will find that the majority of recreational boats in the USA are fiberglass.

Anyone that told you it is easier to get a steel boat repaired in exotic places, than a fiberglass boat, has probably never been there. Finding good marine welders and steel in third world countries is difficult. Most likely you won't have the experience or the equipment on board to do it yourself.

Fiberglass is available world wide and you can learn to repair it fairly easy...
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Old 08-07-2013, 02:38   #23
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Re: Fiberglass and International Travel

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Life is waaayyyy to short to do things the way others think they should be done or the way everyone else does them.
Never have been one to follow the status quo
GG, I'll just say this then leave you alone (I promise!). We're not trying to get in the way of your dreams, just to help you realise them (probably faster than the way you're trying, oddly enough). Life isn't too short to spend a week of it at sea to decide if you and your family actually like it! Making such a big move as this with zero experience of what you're getting in to is just silly! What's your problem with just spending a few days at sea with your kids and an instructor? You would enjoy it! Too arrogant to be taught by someone else? Think you know it all yourself and to hell with 'the way everyone else does things'? You won't last long. My opinion? Until you spend some time at sea, all this is just an idle dream and a waste of your 'short life'!

Out.

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Old 08-07-2013, 05:43   #24
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Re: Fiberglass and International Travel

GG is has a big dream and the money apparently to make part of it come true. She's trying to do her due diligence and asking a lot of questions and likely doing a lot of research online and reading books. There is lots of knowledge required which can be acquired this way and in a compressed time frame for intelligent and motivated people. School of hard knocks is not enough... you need some book learnin'.

The real problem she faces is experience... and that can't come from books to chats with others. She has to get it and her kids do as well. Maybe one of them get terribly seasick very easily. That would / should put the kabosh on her bold plans. Experience can't really be condensed and most old salts still haven't seen it all either. Frankly the amount of stuff you can and may and will have to deal with is mind boggling and hopefully your knowledge and prior experience helps you get over the new hurdles. Trial by fire can have very severe consequences but unfortunately this seems to be how much learning and respect for the sea comes.

I know sailing can be exquisite and delightful and charm almost anyone and fool them too... much the way nasty conditions can make sailing seem like terror. Most cruisers seek only fair conditions but have learned and prepared over time to deal with rotten ones.

I don't know that GG has to spend 4 years with a small boat to experience a range of conditions... or even start with a smaller boat than she wants... but she definitely needs to spend a fair amount of time aboard the vessel type she intends to buy and have her children experience it as well. And she needs to experience some more challenging conditions... perhaps chartering up in the northern latitudes and not in the tropics though we know that sh*t happens in all latitudes and at any season.

I think she's smart enough to understand that you can't buy experience and that this is something which will take time. She doesn't need a continual scolding about her lack of experience on the water. Perhaps she needs advice on how best to get it?
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Old 08-07-2013, 07:17   #25
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Re: Fiberglass and International Travel

Like Captain Ron says, "If anything is going to happen, it's going to happen out there."
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Old 08-07-2013, 07:32   #26
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Re: Fiberglass and International Travel

i am finding that my formosa 41 enjoys breaking down in exotic locales of late--but i also found that there are many souls with the knowledge and ability to repair my systems here in mexico. i dont believe in snotty yotty, but these guys weld awesome and the parts are hiding under different names--my engne is also used for buses and forklifts and tractors, so no shortage of parts--just have to find em..lol the knowledge for rebuilding here is excellent and to those with shiny boats--surprising--to me is understandable, as , her ein mexico, no one disposes of anything until it is absolutely toast.
as there are many pangas here, and those are fiberglass boats of incredible use and numbers, there is plenty of fiberglass and resin to use . i have found welders whom, when treated like human beings not discriminated against as they are mexicans, will do what you need well and for nearly no money.

if i had to do these repairs in usa, it would cost me more than 10 times the money i have so far put out. i love it here...very affordable...but it is merely a stop among others until i get to where i want to be....and is good to have the locals be able to effect repairs at reasonable pricing.
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Old 08-07-2013, 18:15   #27
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Re: Fiberglass and International Travel

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Originally Posted by jeremiason View Post
GG... We cruised for 33 months through Mexico and Central America on a 47 foot sailboat and lived on it 4.5 years before we left.

Sometimes it felt really, really small. You will also find that your five kids can't go out in the backyard to play, which will further make the boat feel smaller.

You should really think about some chartering first to make sure this is for you. Spend a couple of weeks on a boat with your kids... It is not the same as a weekend on a friends boat.

As for steel or fiberglass? That is a personal preference that most sailors choose based on their familiarity with the vessel. Most people I know with steel boats grew up on them or were in the steel/welding trades. Recreational steel boats for the most part are a labor of love, although there are a lot in Europe, you will find that the majority of recreational boats in the USA are fiberglass.

Anyone that told you it is easier to get a steel boat repaired in exotic places, than a fiberglass boat, has probably never been there. Finding good marine welders and steel in third world countries is difficult. Most likely you won't have the experience or the equipment on board to do it yourself.

Fiberglass is available world wide and you can learn to repair it fairly easy...
Tom,
Good info. Thank you.
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Old 08-07-2013, 18:19   #28
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Re: Fiberglass and International Travel

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i am finding that my formosa 41 enjoys breaking down in exotic locales of late--but i also found that there are many souls with the knowledge and ability to repair my systems here in mexico. i dont believe in snotty yotty, but these guys weld awesome and the parts are hiding under different names--my engne is also used for buses and forklifts and tractors, so no shortage of parts--just have to find em..lol the knowledge for rebuilding here is excellent and to those with shiny boats--surprising--to me is understandable, as , her ein mexico, no one disposes of anything until it is absolutely toast.
as there are many pangas here, and those are fiberglass boats of incredible use and numbers, there is plenty of fiberglass and resin to use . i have found welders whom, when treated like human beings not discriminated against as they are mexicans, will do what you need well and for nearly no money.

if i had to do these repairs in usa, it would cost me more than 10 times the money i have so far put out. i love it here...very affordable...but it is merely a stop among others until i get to where i want to be....and is good to have the locals be able to effect repairs at reasonable pricing.
Zeehag,
Thanks for your perspective on things. It always amazes me how varied the opinions on this topic steel vs. fiberglass. I guess it just goes to show different strokes for different folks. The is no right or wrong way, just the best way for you.
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Old 08-07-2013, 18:27   #29
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Originally Posted by AbaftAndBaffled View Post

Way I see it, either it'll work out great for them or it'll make for an amazing deal on a 70' powerboat for someone down the road. I agree with the sail vs power thing though, I can't imagine being confined inside a powerboat for weeks at a time with nothing to do but watch the chart plotter. That's basically prison, isn't it?
On be Atlantic crossing , we didnt touch the rig for days , boats are never prisons ,owner or sail.

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Old 08-07-2013, 18:29   #30
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Re: Fiberglass and International Travel

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GG is has a big dream and the money apparently to make part of it come true. She's trying to do her due diligence and asking a lot of questions and likely doing a lot of research online and reading books. There is lots of knowledge required which can be acquired this way and in a compressed time frame for intelligent and motivated people. School of hard knocks is not enough... you need some book learnin'.

The real problem she faces is experience... and that can't come from books to chats with others. She has to get it and her kids do as well. Maybe one of them get terribly seasick very easily. That would / should put the kabosh on her bold plans. Experience can't really be condensed and most old salts still haven't seen it all either. Frankly the amount of stuff you can and may and will have to deal with is mind boggling and hopefully your knowledge and prior experience helps you get over the new hurdles. Trial by fire can have very severe consequences but unfortunately this seems to be how much learning and respect for the sea comes.

I know sailing can be exquisite and delightful and charm almost anyone and fool them too... much the way nasty conditions can make sailing seem like terror. Most cruisers seek only fair conditions but have learned and prepared over time to deal with rotten ones.

I don't know that GG has to spend 4 years with a small boat to experience a range of conditions... or even start with a smaller boat than she wants... but she definitely needs to spend a fair amount of time aboard the vessel type she intends to buy and have her children experience it as well. And she needs to experience some more challenging conditions... perhaps chartering up in the northern latitudes and not in the tropics though we know that sh*t happens in all latitudes and at any season.

I think she's smart enough to understand that you can't buy experience and that this is something which will take time. She doesn't need a continual scolding about her lack of experience on the water. Perhaps she needs advice on how best to get it?
Thank you Jef, well put.

I will also add that I think many hear either forget or missed the many, many times that I have said that I do NOT plan to cruise until I can operate the boat independently and very well. However long this may take. We will liveaboard at a dock in a marina for a while. During this time I will be taking courses, and getting hands on training and learning the boat systems. I will hire a captain when we want to take a trip. I can also learn from the captain during the trips. But, we will not be out cruising straight away. There will be a lot of training to do first.
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