Cruisers Forum
 


Join CruisersForum Today

Reply
 
Thread Tools Rate Thread Display Modes
Old 09-11-2009, 16:54   #1
Registered User

Join Date: Nov 2009
Location: Santa Cruz, CA
Boat: Wellcraft 240 Coastal
Posts: 4
Cruising the Pacific Northwest and Alaska's Inside Passage

I am looking for some advice from people that have experience cruising the Pacific Northwest.

In the next year or two I may be in a position to take a few years off to chase a dream. I have always wanted to take the time to explore the Pacific Northwest by power boat. I am talking about extended trips up to Alaska and all points in between. My biggest question right now is what kind of boat?

My initial thoughts are something around the 35-40 foot range. I would like something that is comfortable but not so big that I will have problems handling it by myself. My primary goals will be photography and some scuba diving.

I am beginning to learn about the different types of larger boats. Sedans, tugs, sportfishers, trawlers, etc. Any thoughts or recommendations from experienced cruisers? I have a lot of experience on smaller boats and currently have a 25 foot Wellcraft Coastal in a slip in Santa Cruz. I am trying to get as much time on the water as I can to increase my knowledge and experience. I figure I will end up with a used boat then spend a good amount of time going through it top to bottom before it hits the water. Upgrade where needed, outfit it for my needs, and make sure everything is safe. Once itís ready to go I will look for some experience folks to take my first few trips with.

I do not have a firm budget yet but would like to stay under $100k. And please donít contact me trying to sell me your boat. I am not in the market yet.

I know there are a ton of different options out there as well as a ton of different opinions. Just looking for a little help in getting started.

Thanks!
__________________

__________________
Divtruk is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 09-11-2009, 17:19   #2
Senior Cruiser
 
jackdale's Avatar

Cruisers Forum Supporter

Join Date: Mar 2008
Location: Calgary, AB, Canada
Posts: 5,048
Images: 1
Personally I think that a twin screw trawler would be a good bet. Aside from being well built, they tend to be well maintained. Of course a thorough survey and mechanical inspection would confirm that, or not.

Jack
__________________

__________________
ISPA Yachtmaster Ocean Instructor Evaluator
Sail Canada Advanced Cruising Instructor
IYT Yachtmaster Coastal Instructor
ASA 201, 203,204, 205, 206, 214
As I sail, I praise God, and care not. (Luke Foxe)
jackdale is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 09-11-2009, 17:28   #3
Registered User
 
alpinista55's Avatar

Join Date: Jun 2009
Location: Portland, OR
Boat: Tartan 37 - Betty Lou
Posts: 28
Hi --
Before I figured out that I was better suited for sailing, when i first started looking for a cruising boat I was looking at trawlers. I had a similar budget, and wanted to find a boat that was easy on fuel. I found that what suited my criteria and budget best were 30-year old taiwan trawlers with a single Ford Leyman diesel. You can get into a decent CHB, for example, for under $100k, and they cruise at 7-8 knots at about 1-2 gallons/hour. As you start looking at better boats, like Grand Banks or Krogen, or Nordic Tug, the price skyrockets, and the fuel economy plummets. I recently read the account of an ex-sailor who now cruises in a Nordic Tug with twin turbo diesels between Seattle and Alaska. He paid $450k for the boat and he puts his fuel budget for a season of cruising at $10k. I really liked the 42 foot Grand Banks, but even a project boat was usually well over 100K.

In the end I went with a sailboat. I have a great vintage Tartan 37 sloop that takes me anywhere I want to go at a fraction of the cost (paid under 70k for the boat, in near bristol condition). Last year on a trip from our home port in Portland Oregon to Barkley Sound on the west coast of Vancouver Island and return we used 20 gals of fuel over nearly a month of cruising.
__________________
Tartan 37 Betty Lou
Hull # 118, deep fin keel
St. Helens, OR
alpinista55 is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 09-11-2009, 17:36   #4
CF Adviser
 
Bash's Avatar

Cruisers Forum Supporter

Join Date: Dec 2008
Location: sausalito
Boat: 14 meter sloop
Posts: 7,260
I second the notion of a single-screw trawler, especially at your price range. The first time I chartered a 35' trawler with a Ford Leyman diesel up in the Gulf Islands I was astonished to discover that I only used about 15 gallons a week (running about 4 hours per day.)

It helps to wait for the tide whenever possible, of course.
__________________
cruising is entirely about showing up--in boat shoes.
Bash is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 09-11-2009, 19:42   #5
Registered User

Join Date: Nov 2009
Location: Santa Cruz, CA
Boat: Wellcraft 240 Coastal
Posts: 4
I have a feeling that the $100k will end up being a bit to optimistic. But who knows, with the boat market like it is....
__________________
Divtruk is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 09-11-2009, 20:01   #6
Registered User

Join Date: Feb 2009
Location: Texada Island BC
Boat: Tartan 37 Adios III
Posts: 86
I would buy an old wooden fishboat. There are some great buys. My budget would be under 20K. But then I too have a Tartan 37 and have cruised a lot in the PNW. On our way to Mexico now.....
__________________
daedaluscan is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 09-11-2009, 21:18   #7
Senior Cruiser
 
delmarrey's Avatar

Cruisers Forum Supporter

Join Date: Mar 2003
Location: Now in Blaine, WA
Boat: Modified Choate 40
Posts: 10,702
Images: 122
No matter what boat you get, what I'd suggest is to get all the charts and each day before heading out is mark all the shoals and underwater rocks that you may possibly encounter.

As well, you'll want to learn anchoring technics for steep underwater embankments especially once you get north of Vancouver.

And you'll want a copy of ports and passes for the year you'll be going.

Updates to 2009 tide book and Other Boating News

And good rain gear. The boat will need a heater for the nights too.

I'd suggest a heavy boat if your not a seasoned sailor.


Enjoy!
__________________
Faithful are the Wounds of a Friend, but the Kisses of the Enemy are Deceitful! ........
A nation of sheep breeds a government of wolves!

Unprepared boaters, end up as floatsum!.......
delmarrey is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 10-11-2009, 09:08   #8
Registered User

Join Date: Nov 2009
Location: on Hammersley Inlet
Boat: 1977 34' Northwind "LadyTramac"
Posts: 4
PNW

There are a host of "LOF's"* when looking for a boat. Since there are so many, I will do this serialy as it takes time.

Surveyors:
Do not trust any of them! If you find a boat you really like, have a good boating friend with you when the survey is performed. Someone that really knows his own boat and has cruising experience.

Do not trust the broker! He wants the boat gone for the commision and will say or do whatever it takes to get you to take it.

I paid for surveys on two different boats. Expensive! The first boat failed a second survey on the haulout(long story) The second, my wife said "THIS is the boat!" and I as well as she were blind sided (another long story) by the broker who said he would select the best surveyor in Anacortes.

My preference is twin diesels. During some dock chat I remarked how manuverable a bboat was with twins where upon another boater said, "I have a single with a bow thruster and can dock anywhere!" My retort was, "I can you get home on bow thruster?"

I will add more later, but remember. It is the journey, not the destination!

Jim

*look out for
__________________
Jim Callea is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 10-11-2009, 19:46   #9
Registered User

Join Date: Nov 2009
Location: on Hammersley Inlet
Boat: 1977 34' Northwind "LadyTramac"
Posts: 4
100G is not a difficult price range. It will be a comfortable boat, but expect to spend 10 to 20% more for upgrades. When you see a boat you like, sit down make yourself comfortable and then mentally move in. Where will the extra cloths go!, is there enough room for stores on a long trip? How much fuel will the boat carry for those long runs at night? is the anchor really right for this boat? How easy is it to board the boat? can you get to all parts of the boat without falling overboard?

This next spring, if you can, go to a boat club rendevous and visit for awhile. The Puget Sound Tolly Club have several each year and they, as well as others, love to chat about their boats and cruising.

Get a copy of Northwest Yachting (free)a and scan the boats for sale in your category. Call them and chat. The more knowledge you gain will make your choice easier(maybe!)

Although fuel prices may look scary, just run some numbers for staying in motels, eating out(yuk), traffic, crowds, not being able to stay where you want,etc. ALWAYS expect weather to hold you in port, you will not be alone when that happens.
Jim
__________________
Jim Callea is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 20-11-2009, 15:26   #10
Registered User
 
u4ea32's Avatar

Join Date: Nov 2009
Location: Los Angeles and Hawaii
Boat: Olson 40
Posts: 231
You might want to consider simply chartering. The only bare boat firm I could find is Nordic Tug Charters out of Juneau. We had a GREAT time, probably best vacation ever (and there's a lot of competition for that title).

I got all the charts for free downloaded to my laptop.

Its very easy place to cruise. The people are the best part!
__________________
u4ea32 is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 27-11-2009, 15:22   #11
Registered User

Join Date: Nov 2009
Location: Keene NH
Boat: Home built Devlin Surfscoter27
Posts: 6
Quote:
Originally Posted by jackdale View Post
Personally I think that a twin screw trawler would be a good bet. Aside from being well built, they tend to be well maintained. Of course a thorough survey and mechanical inspection would confirm that, or not.

Jack
I don't beleive being a twin screw has anything to do with how heavily a boat is built or how well it is maintained? Twin screws are more money more maintenance and usually more expensive.
__________________
FlyingDog is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 27-11-2009, 16:53   #12
Registered User

Join Date: Oct 2009
Location: CLOD in OH
Posts: 257
100k altogether,or 100k for boat and another $20k for upgrades? Singlehanding will mean you need the services of Auto as in auto-pilot on board. And a good radar and gps system. Throw in a Epirb and liferaft and you will have 6 or 7 k left out of the 20. Anything you buy will need refit. Major missed costs on older boats are replacement of fuel,holding and water tanks. These are usually incapsulated under floors and outboard of machinery. They do not do any testing of these only visual inspection (pay particular attention to fuel tank tops as a bad seal around the fill tube will eat the top away) I would insist on filling every tank and letting them sit for a few days if I was truly ready to buy. I would probably go with 30-35 ft single eng hopefully a small lehman or perkins with a skeg or full keel (mainly for the fuel savings). Largest cuddy cabin I could find and smallest cockpit (more under cover space). I would want to travel in only favorable conditions but the boat must be designed to take heavy weather. Other than the size of the cockpit sounds like a small commercial fishing boat might be the answer. Cape Dory makes a sweet 32 ft, but it is overpowered with a cat. They also mounted the alum fuel tank on a piece of plywood without neopreme strips 4200 to the bottom of the tank. Oxygen starved water attacked the bottom of the tank and holed it. Engine had to be removed to get to tank. The couple that owns it live aboard in the bahamas 6 months every year. So it is a doable size. Would have a surveyor (find the tough nut person who boat brokers shake at the mention of his name) look at it . Since it is a 2 yr plan I would definitly try to control costs so I could recoup most of my investement (good luck on that). Good luck and good boat hunting!!
__________________
Paydirt
Mark Zarley is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 29-11-2009, 22:32   #13
Registered User
 
Garffin's Avatar

Join Date: Nov 2009
Boat: Bristol 24'
Posts: 7
Get a 58' purse seiner

I can speak first hand of some of the wooden purse seiners. I know wood! Go to fishermanís terminal in Seattle WA and walk the docks. Take a look at these boats! Some of the Delta boats are awesome. I worked more than a few years in AK and have taken that trip more than 25 times. Them boats were made just for that. You could get a boat pretty cheap and still have money for money left over.
__________________
Garffin is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 30-11-2009, 14:37   #14
Registered User

Join Date: Nov 2009
Location: Santa Cruz, CA
Boat: Wellcraft 240 Coastal
Posts: 4
Thanks much for all the input! Most likely I will be leaning toward twin screw mainly for the safety aspect of being able to get home if one goes out.
__________________
Divtruk is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 30-11-2009, 14:54   #15
Registered User

Join Date: Nov 2009
Posts: 34
Here is an outstanding resource for someone who is looking to do the Inside Passage.
Bedoeling** Travel Logs and Photographs

Read, prepare, sail, and write about it!
__________________

__________________
Quads is offline   Reply With Quote
Reply

Tags
alaska, pacific northwest

Thread Tools
Display Modes Rate This Thread
Rate This Thread:

Posting Rules
You may not post new threads
You may not post replies
You may not post attachments
You may not edit your posts

BB code is On
Smilies are On
[IMG] code is On
HTML code is Off
Trackbacks are Off
Pingbacks are Off
Refbacks are Off


Similar Threads
Thread Thread Starter Forum Replies Last Post
Hello from the Pacific Northwest! SweetSurrender Meets & Greets 9 29-12-2008 00:57
hullo from the Pacific Northwest janders Meets & Greets 5 04-09-2008 12:37
Northwest Passage Colorado Dreamer Polar Regions 22 01-09-2008 13:05
Looking for a boat, Pacific Northwest Buddy_Y Classifieds Archive 11 25-06-2008 09:43



Copyright 2002- Social Knowledge, LLC All Rights Reserved.

All times are GMT -7. The time now is 16:58.


Google+
Powered by vBulletin® Version 3.8.8 Beta 1
Copyright ©2000 - 2017, vBulletin Solutions, Inc.
Social Knowledge Networks
Powered by vBulletin® Version 3.8.8 Beta 1
Copyright ©2000 - 2017, vBulletin Solutions, Inc.

ShowCase vBulletin Plugins by Drive Thru Online, Inc.