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Old 21-04-2017, 08:48   #1
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Cruisers more seaworthy than trawlers?

I have been reading the book "Boating Skills and Seamanship" published by the US Coast Guard Auxiliary 14th edition. In this book on pages 28 and 29 is a table listing the characteristics of different types of boats. In the category of "Seaworthiness" it gives Trawler-Style Yacht as "good", and Offshore Cruiser as "excellent". I had thought full displacement trawlers were more seaworthy than cruisers since cruisers are usually semi-displacement. Is the rating in the book assuming the comparison of semi-displacement trawler-type yachts to cruisers, or was my idea about seaworthiness just incorrect and cruisers are generally more seaworthy than any kind of trawler yacht, as the book seems to suggest?
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Old 21-04-2017, 08:54   #2
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Re: Cruisers more seaworthy than trawlers?

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I have been reading the book "Boating Skills and Seamanship" published by the US Coast Guard Auxiliary 14th edition. In this book on pages 28 and 29 is a table listing the characteristics of different types of boats. In the category of "Seaworthiness" it gives Trawler-Style Yacht as "good", and Offshore Cruiser as "excellent". I had thought full displacement trawlers were more seaworthy than cruisers since cruisers are usually semi-displacement. Is the rating in the book assuming the comparison of semi-displacement trawler-type yachts to cruisers, or was my idea about seaworthiness just incorrect and cruisers are generally more seaworthy than any kind of trawler yacht, as the book seems to suggest?
Are you headed in a new direction? You mentioned "Boston to Maine" before. A trawler is fine for that.
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Old 21-04-2017, 08:59   #3
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Re: Cruisers more seaworthy than trawlers?

You assumptions about hull type are incorrect.


A cruiser is going to have a full heavy displacement keel, a Troller will also have a full heavy displacement keel and will be just as seaworthy.


A trawler style yacht is generally closer to a semi-planning hull with a keel, but not necessarily weighted. They don't go real fast, but with some horse power can _start_ to plane....they go faster but also burn a ton of fuel because they are climbing a hill of water all the time.
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Old 21-04-2017, 10:02   #4
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Re: Cruisers more seaworthy than trawlers?

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Originally Posted by jsc7 View Post
I have been reading the book "Boating Skills and Seamanship" published by the US Coast Guard Auxiliary 14th edition. In this book on pages 28 and 29 is a table listing the characteristics of different types of boats. In the category of "Seaworthiness" it gives Trawler-Style Yacht as "good", and Offshore Cruiser as "excellent". I had thought full displacement trawlers were more seaworthy than cruisers since cruisers are usually semi-displacement. Is the rating in the book assuming the comparison of semi-displacement trawler-type yachts to cruisers, or was my idea about seaworthiness just incorrect and cruisers are generally more seaworthy than any kind of trawler yacht, as the book seems to suggest?

The details of a specific boat matter. The USCG book (a very useful general reference, also used for their introductory safe boating course) is essentially boiling a bazillion pages of science and opinion into a very brief overview.

The "trawler-yacht" wording is a clue; often they're not full-displacement hulls. And "Cruisers" (Offshore or otherwise) can mean pretty much anything. (Here on this forum, it usually means a sailboat probably 99% of the time. In some powerboating circles, it's 30' express boat, in some it's a 48' Hatteras "Long Range Cruiser" -- one of many actual Hatteras LRC models, some with full displacement hulls. And some "Offshore Cruisers" have semi-displacement hull. And so forth.)

On the other forum, you might read through the many (many!) threads on full displacement versus semi-displacement (and semi-planing) hulls. And also review the many "what's a trawler?" threads, given it's a flexible "marketing" word more than anything else these days.

Also, there's a difference between seaworthiness and comfort. Many boats will take much more abuse than the crew and passengers can handle.

And another also, seaworthiness is a quality naval architects are expected to design into every boat. For the most part, manufacturers also think building their boats to be seaworthy is a good thing. The differences in design and execution then tend to be about specific conditions of employment (2' seas? 30' seas?) where some boats might do better than others. Or where owners of some boats might just choose to weight for a better weather window. "Better" being a relative and personal concept.

It's slightly easier to compare specific boats, versus broad categories. You could pick any two or three boats (or whatever) you like because they meet your space and maybe predicted usage requirements (make your best guess)... or even just because you like the way they look... then ask the question again, seeking a relative comparison or ranking.

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Old 21-04-2017, 10:22   #5
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Re: Cruisers more seaworthy than trawlers?

How about forgetting about "trawler", "cruiser", "sport" etc. concentrate on defining hull shapes instead.

Displacement with chines

Displacement with slack bilges

Semi planing

Planing

Etc.....
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Old 22-04-2017, 05:25   #6
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Re: Cruisers more seaworthy than trawlers?

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Is the rating in the book assuming the comparison of semi-displacement trawler-type yachts to cruisers, or was my idea about seaworthiness just incorrect and cruisers are generally more seaworthy than any kind of trawler yacht, as the book seems to suggest?
You're reading WAY too much into this comparison. As was pointed out, that book (and I teach it) is a very basic and brief overview for new recreational boaters (overwhelmingly power boaters) who aren't ever going to get into the bug-dust details of hull design.

The terms "cruiser" and "trawler" are used in their marketing sense; generic categories that newbies might divide recreational power boats into.

Trawler = bigger, heavier and slower than the small runabout most people are familiar with.

Cruiser = even bigger, even heavier power boat. That book has been around a long time. I suspect the word in used in the sense of what we used to call a "cabin cruiser," only bigger.

All it's trying to say is that a larger, heavier boat is generally more "seaworthy" than a smaller, lighter one.
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Old 22-04-2017, 05:46   #7
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Re: Cruisers more seaworthy than trawlers?

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You're reading WAY too much into this comparison. As was pointed out, that book (and I teach it) is a very basic and brief overview for new recreational boaters (overwhelmingly power boaters) who aren't ever going to get into the bug-dust details of hull design.

The terms "cruiser" and "trawler" are used in their marketing sense; generic categories that newbies might divide recreational power boats into.

Trawler = bigger, heavier and slower than the small runabout most people are familiar with.

Cruiser = even bigger, even heavier power boat. That book has been around a long time. I suspect the word in used in the sense of what we used to call a "cabin cruiser," only bigger.

All it's trying to say is that a larger, heavier boat is generally more "seaworthy" than a smaller, lighter one.
You are 100% correct, good Sir. Back in the day, there were runabouts, cabin cruisers, and yachts. Yachts meaning HUGE million-dollar rigs (power or sail). One day my dad said to me "Come with me. I want to go look at a cabin cruiser thats for sale down in Boothbay Harbor. It's a used 36-foot Chris Craft."

In the "cabin cruiser" category, there were also "trawlers" (e.g., a 32-46 Grand Banks) just due to boat design ... unless it was a HUGE trawler (hahaha), then it suddenly became a "yacht".
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Old 22-04-2017, 08:21   #8
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Re: Cruisers more seaworthy than trawlers?

A 7 knot trawler will not be able to outrun dangerous weather that a 30 knot cruiser coud.......
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Old 22-04-2017, 08:36   #9
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Re: Cruisers more seaworthy than trawlers?

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Originally Posted by jsc7 View Post
I have been reading the book "Boating Skills and Seamanship" published by the US Coast Guard Auxiliary 14th edition. In this book on pages 28 and 29 is a table listing the characteristics of different types of boats. In the category of "Seaworthiness" it gives Trawler-Style Yacht as "good", and Offshore Cruiser as "excellent". I had thought full displacement trawlers were more seaworthy than cruisers since cruisers are usually semi-displacement. Is the rating in the book assuming the comparison of semi-displacement trawler-type yachts to cruisers, or was my idea about seaworthiness just incorrect and cruisers are generally more seaworthy than any kind of trawler yacht, as the book seems to suggest?
===

Trawlers come in a lot of different flavors so it's not appropriate to paint them all with the same brush. Most "trawler style" yachts (like Grand Banks) are suitable for near coastal cruising and island hopping but not for far offshore where multi day gale force winds might be encountered. The difference is mostly in the size and strength of the cabin structure, i.e., doors, windows, etc., but also in hull shape and stability. An offshore boat should be able to survive taking a breaking sea on deck without losing water tight integrity or capsizing. Not many recreational trawlers can do that.
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Old 22-04-2017, 09:06   #10
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Re: Cruisers more seaworthy than trawlers?

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Originally Posted by jsc7 View Post
I have been reading the book "Boating Skills and Seamanship" published by the US Coast Guard Auxiliary 14th edition. In this book on pages 28 and 29 is a table listing the characteristics of different types of boats. In the category of "Seaworthiness" it gives Trawler-Style Yacht as "good", and Offshore Cruiser as "excellent". I had thought full displacement trawlers were more seaworthy than cruisers since cruisers are usually semi-displacement. Is the rating in the book assuming the comparison of semi-displacement trawler-type yachts to cruisers, or was my idea about seaworthiness just incorrect and cruisers are generally more seaworthy than any kind of trawler yacht, as the book seems to suggest?
That's BS.
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Old 22-04-2017, 09:16   #11
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Re: Cruisers more seaworthy than trawlers?

I don't understand why anyone would just write BS. Are you saying the Coastguard book is wrong or jsc7 is wrong or all the other posts are wrong?
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Old 22-04-2017, 09:30   #12
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Re: Cruisers more seaworthy than trawlers?

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A 7 knot trawler will not be able to outrun dangerous weather that a 30 knot cruiser coud.......
500nm offshore the 30kt cruiser is not going to be able to outrun the weather either, the amount of fuel needed to get beyond the edge of a decent storm would weigh enough that that the vessel couldn't get on a plane.
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Old 22-04-2017, 09:52   #13
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Re: Cruisers more seaworthy than trawlers?

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I don't understand why anyone would just write BS. Are you saying the Coastguard book is wrong or jsc7 is wrong or all the other posts are wrong?
It maybe a misinterpretation or not. Go back and look at some prior posts.
Someone suggested troll.
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Old 22-04-2017, 10:01   #14
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Re: Cruisers more seaworthy than trawlers?

Cadence everyone else from post 2 to post nine have at least tried to make a contribution to jsc7's question except you at post 10.
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Old 22-04-2017, 10:10   #15
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Re: Cruisers more seaworthy than trawlers?

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Cadence everyone else from post 2 to post nine have at least tried to make a contribution to jsc7's question except you at post 10.
I was not speaking of the current post but several over the past few days by the OP. Again it is a Not worth the effort.
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