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Old 13-01-2013, 11:04   #16
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Re: Completely Overwhelmed

Love the idea of a houseboat, but they don't really move- No good.

Kids are 13, 12, 12, 11 and 3. Plus my mom and maybe hubby accompany at times.

Not at all interested in sail. Trawler or great fuel mobos only.

I think what is confusing me the most at this time is range capabilities. I know that I want to be able to go to the Caribbean at some point, even if it is a captain getting me there. Confused about whether I need to get a "long range" boat to be able to do this or just a trawler with a large fuel capacity. How much fuel would I need?
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Old 13-01-2013, 11:18   #17
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Re: Completely Overwhelmed

How much fuel basically depends on:-

- how big the boat is.
- how big (and how many) engines
- how fast you are travelling.

Most vendors should know what the fuel consumption is at max and crusing speeds (treat all claims with caution!) and what the tankage is (they should do!)......weather and load will also play a part, but the above are the top 3.

Whatever you buy will be in the GPH (gallons per hour) rather than MPH (miles per hour) end of things.....that being the reason why sail is so popular!

An idea of budget would give folks a bit more to work with............(that choices thing again!).
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Old 13-01-2013, 11:22   #18
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Re: Completely Overwhelmed

Do a Florida trip--lots of boats to look at and easy to get to from New England. Plus, you can make it a fun winter vacation trip if you want to. Miami show is coming in February and you could look at all the new ones there and I think they have a brokerage show too. Here you go.
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Old 13-01-2013, 11:32   #19
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Re: Completely Overwhelmed

Just to throw one more design at you, a catamaran trawler. (4) queen staterooms (lets face it, with your size family no kid will get a stateroom to him/her self), steady on the hook (no need for flopper stoppers), fuel burn in the range of 3 gallons per hour at 7 kt, and a large salon for 8 people.
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Old 13-01-2013, 11:36   #20
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Re: Completely Overwhelmed

Have you put any thought into fuel usage? Smallish trawlers use 3-5 gallons a hour to go slow (5-7kts) throttle that up and a 34' can use 7-10 gallons an hour. A big family like yours would need a much bigger boat. You could end up burning 8 to 20 gallons an hour easy. It quickly gets into hundreds of dollars a day in fuel. Lots of people do it though. Would a $20,000 fuel bill be an issue? I love trawlers, but even a small one uses triple my current hourly burn.
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Old 13-01-2013, 11:41   #21
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Re: Completely Overwhelmed

GG,

There was one big Hat at the marina I use as my base in Boothbay Maine. She was on the hard and just looking at the props made me cringe, I wondered how much would one of those cost to replace. My point is: keep in mind the cost of maintaining such a boat before you decide. Good luck in your search.
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Old 13-01-2013, 11:58   #22
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Re: Completely Overwhelmed

Don't worry. We all start at the same point, i.e. knowing nothing. But there is a lot to know so if possible, don't be rushed or you are likely to make costly mistakes.

I agree that the Miami boat show coming up in a couple of weeks is a great opportunity to see a lot of boats in one place. Also, I think immediately before the Miami show is the Trawler Fest in Ft Lauderdale. If you are interested in trawlers, that would be a good stop too.

Here are a few random thought:

- How much boating experience do you have so far? It's useful to know how big a step you are looking to take.

- You express interest in a trawler. Can you say more about why? What is it that you like about them? It will help in clarifying you "SOR" (great suggestion, by the way).

- Boats generally operate as displacement speed which you can figure to be 8 kts or so, or they are semi or full planing boats and can go 15-25kts. Slower boats will have less space devoted to engines and get better MPG (figure 1 MPG for the size range you are talking about). Faster boats will obviously get you somewhere quicker, but do so at 0.25-0.5 MPG. Getting there fast means bigger tanks and bigger wallet.

- Where you you envision living aboard? In New England, or somewhere else. Living aboard in New England, though possible, is fraught with challenges.

- You say you would like to be able to reach the Bahamas, but that ties back to the previous question. From Florida it's a pretty easy shot and most any boat that will fit all of you will also be able to make it there with no trouble. But if you are gogin from New England it's a lot further.

- 4/5 staterooms is a lot and probably means a 65'+ boat. Your other option is to rack and stack the kids a bit more which is more typically how boats carry more people.

- When you get above about 55', many boats are laid out assuming there is crew on board, i.e. there are crew quarters. This can work both ways for you as it might be a good place for some of the kids. But also look at how the crew quarters are connected to the other living space. Many boats are set up so the owners never need to see the unsightly crew, and the crew quarters are only accessible from the outside decks.

- How much to you expect to be out and underway in the boat versus in a marina?

- If this is your first boat and you are contemplating buying a 65' boat and moving aboard, I would suggest extreme caution. Most people work their way up 10' or so at a time, with each step being a refinement of their wants and desires in a boat. It's kinda like raising kids where each step is preparation for the next. Imagine if they were born teenagers? If you are serious about taking such a big step, you really need a good consultant to help you. In theory that's what the broker does, but some are better than others at serving your needs over theirs. Perhaps people here can recommend someone to work with. There are some very good people out there, along with the problem people. The trick is figuring out which is which before you make a big buying mistake.
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Old 13-01-2013, 12:15   #23
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Re: Completely Overwhelmed

Quote:
Originally Posted by GalaxyGirl View Post


I've been in the real estate investment business for over 13 years and I've NEVER had as much confusion buying a house as I am having with choosing a potential boat.
You have been a "live aboard" in houses your entire life and can draw from a lifetime of experience. Boats are new to you and are also far more complicated than houses. I am talking 10 times or maybe 100 times more complicated.

Boats are also something like 10 to 100 times more expensive per square foot than houses are. This makes it even more important to be knowledgeable about the purchase and ongoing maintenance.

I do not think any amount of research will provide the answers to the needed questions without also having lots of experience on boats.


I do not mean to dissuade you from your dream. You and your family need to get onboard as many boats as you can. Try and get aboard boats that are currently being used in the way you intend to use your boat. Good luck.

Steve

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Old 13-01-2013, 12:29   #24
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Re: Completely Overwhelmed

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Originally Posted by GalaxyGirl View Post

(...) I am having (much confusion) with choosing a potential boat. I'm very frustrated at this point. There are so many variables and maybe too many choices. One discovery leads to more research which then leads to another discovery and I feel like I could spend another 3 years on research without ever having viewed a damn thing. (...)
IMHO buy the boat as you buy any other tool: get the best one you can afford for the job at hand. Quality tools make any job easier, safer and more fun (assuming the holding hand is somewhat skilled).

E.g.:

If you want to go in ice, get a metal pilothouse thing with good engines (plural from: engine). Good heating system onboard a most welcome optional extra.

If you want to sail rtw the easy way, get a light, beamy thing with huge main and a decent kite. Large cockpit, plenty of ventilation and ample bimini most welcome. A watermaker most desired ... unless you get a Cigale!

If you want to live aboard in one location mostly, get a cruising barge.

Etc., etc..

Do not buy a brewery if all you want is to drink a cold one now and then. Charter rather than buy, unless you want to spend plenty of time, say years, onboard.

My standing advice (may apply to 99% of cases but not at all to the rarefied 1%): funds permitting, get a quality catamaran; otherwise buy a quality mono.

b.
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Old 13-01-2013, 12:34   #25
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Re: Completely Overwhelmed

Just because it has sails, doesn't mean you have to sail. Have you considered something like a Privilege 585? 5 staterooms and lots of space. Plus the twin engines make it easier to handle. If you decide to go to the Caribbean you can hire a sailing captain and sail it for less $$ on fuel.
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Old 13-01-2013, 12:44   #26
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I completely agree with get some experience by chartering different types and sizes of boats. Anything over 60'-65' you will need to have very advanced electronics (joystick controls etc) to handle without hiring a crew. Every boat I've owned was better than the last but there is always something you wish you had after you see it on another boat. You will get a good idea of what's out there by research but actually using a boat and seeing what you can and can't do with it is only way you will ever get anywhere with your search.
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Old 13-01-2013, 13:23   #27
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Re: Completely Overwhelmed

One person's transition from a sailboat to a catamaran trawler.

Transition to a Catamaran Trawler « Coastline Cruising
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Old 13-01-2013, 14:34   #28
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Re: Completely Overwhelmed

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Originally Posted by twistedtree View Post
Don't worry. We all start at the same point, i.e. knowing nothing. But there is a lot to know so if possible, don't be rushed or you are likely to make costly mistakes.

I agree that the Miami boat show coming up in a couple of weeks is a great opportunity to see a lot of boats in one place. Also, I think immediately before the Miami show is the Trawler Fest in Ft Lauderdale. If you are interested in trawlers, that would be a good stop too.

Does the Miami boat show feature second hand boats or all they all new. I was trying to avoid looking at anything that I can't afford as to not make the stuff that I can afford look bad.

Here are a few random thought:

- How much boating experience do you have so far? It's useful to know how big a step you are looking to take. none

- You express interest in a trawler. Can you say more about why? What is it that you like about them? It will help in clarifying you "SOR" (great suggestion, by the way). I want to take lots of trips with my kids and eventually cruise full-time. Trawlers keep the fuel bill down compared to faster boats.

- Boats generally operate as displacement speed which you can figure to be 8 kts or so, or they are semi or full planing boats and can go 15-25kts. Slower boats will have less space devoted to engines and get better MPG (figure 1 MPG for the size range you are talking about). Faster boats will obviously get you somewhere quicker, but do so at 0.25-0.5 MPG. Getting there fast means bigger tanks and bigger wallet. I will be in no hurry. We will make frequent stops when traveling and enjoy the journey. If I want speed I'll take a jet

- Where you you envision living aboard? In New England, or somewhere else. Living aboard in New England, though possible, is fraught with challenges. I will live aboard in New England. I guess that will be part of the fun, figuring out how to handle winters. I have already located my marina and they are very welcoming and accomodating to liveaboards. there are also others at this marina who live there all year (and in much smaller boats)

- You say you would like to be able to reach the Bahamas, but that ties back to the previous question. From Florida it's a pretty easy shot and most any boat that will fit all of you will also be able to make it there with no trouble. But if you are gogin from New England it's a lot further. This is something that I didn't realize. That most 65 footers will make that trip. This was part of my confusion. Thanks for clarifying that. I would cruise the coast or ICW until I hit Florida, then shoot over from there.

- 4/5 staterooms is a lot and probably means a 65'+ boat. Your other option is to rack and stack the kids a bit more which is more typically how boats carry more people. I was figuring just that, a 65

- When you get above about 55', many boats are laid out assuming there is crew on board, i.e. there are crew quarters. This can work both ways for you as it might be a good place for some of the kids. But also look at how the crew quarters are connected to the other living space. Many boats are set up so the owners never need to see the unsightly crew, and the crew quarters are only accessible from the outside decks. Seperate crew quarters would be even better, than the teens can have a seperate space.

- How much to you expect to be out and underway in the boat versus in a marina? Initially, just during school vacations and summer, but eventually full time when kids are off to college. Hoping by then to be able to operate it without a captain.

- If this is your first boat and you are contemplating buying a 65' boat and moving aboard, I would suggest extreme caution. Most people work their way up 10' or so at a time, with each step being a refinement of their wants and desires in a boat. It's kinda like raising kids where each step is preparation for the next. Imagine if they were born teenagers? If you are serious about taking such a big step, you really need a good consultant to help you. In theory that's what the broker does, but some are better than others at serving your needs over theirs. Perhaps people here can recommend someone to work with. There are some very good people out there, along with the problem people. The trick is figuring out which is which before you make a big buying mistake.
Thanks for the very helpful insight. I have another question for you. Should I be concerned about stabilizers or can I add them later?
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Old 13-01-2013, 14:39   #29
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Re: Completely Overwhelmed

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Originally Posted by Everett1rob View Post
I completely agree with get some experience by chartering different types and sizes of boats. Anything over 60'-65' you will need to have very advanced electronics (joystick controls etc) to handle without hiring a crew. Every boat I've owned was better than the last but there is always something you wish you had after you see it on another boat. You will get a good idea of what's out there by research but actually using a boat and seeing what you can and can't do with it is only way you will ever get anywhere with your search.

Can some of these electronics be added to the boat that I purchase. I know that it would be an additional expense, but can it be done?
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Old 13-01-2013, 14:49   #30
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Re: Completely Overwhelmed

does every kid need their own state room ?I shared a bedroom with my brother for many years A friend of mine has a 72 Viking that has 7 berths including crews quaters but that is a big boat worth around $800,000
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