Cruisers Forum
 


Join CruisersForum Today

Reply
 
Thread Tools Rate Thread Display Modes
Old 31-03-2014, 10:12   #31
Registered User

Join Date: Jun 2008
Location: seattle
Boat: Devlin 48 Moon River,j/100 BJ
Posts: 586
Re: Charter Boats and engine life

GG if I have it right you intend to buy live aboard a few years then sell and get another boat. Have you considered something like a house boat in Seattle with a medium sized power boat tied up along side? That may solve a bunch of problems all at once. You and your kids can experience the live aboard life and use the motor boat when school is out to cruise the fabulous waters north of Seattle. The people in the northwest are interesting and the climate is relatively mild year round. You could learn about boats and what you might want by using what you have tied along side your house boat. Resale market for house boats in Seattle might be good and less complicated than a big old power boat.
__________________

__________________
eyschulman is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 31-03-2014, 10:18   #32
Registered User
 
ranger42c's Avatar

Join Date: Aug 2012
Location: Maryland, USA
Boat: 42' Sportfish
Posts: 2,980
Re: Charter Boats and engine life

Quote:
Originally Posted by rw58ph View Post

Taking a 4 day diesel class is mostly a waste of time and money unless you plan on doing most of your own maintenance. I never took a course. Better is to find a diesel mechanic you trust and be there to watched and ask questions. Find a diesel mechanic you trust as you will probable need one anyway.
I agree about the mechanic part...

But I think the courses can be very valuable, especially if one has no prior diesel exposure. I think useful to learn how to change normal stuff like oil filter changes, fuel filters servicing and changes, impeller changes (which can save a few hundred $$$ every year right there)...

And I think especially useful to learn how to diagnose trouble issues... and then to be able to swap out whole water pumps, change drive belts, troubleshoot solenoids or swap out whole starters, etc. even while underway if necessary. The kind of stuff mechanics do, but only if one happens to be aboard...

In one of the courses GG mentions, the School "sabotages" (seriously) a couple diesels, and the exercise is to get 'em running. The issues can be very similar to what one may encounter out there where the mechanic isn't.

And then all that applies not just to the mains, but also the genset's diesel...

Learning valve adjustments was included, too, and that's a bit beyond the fix-it-right-now problems... does begin to stray into being your own mechanic territory... but I also found useful to know what it is I'm paying the mechanic to do, how much he has to know to do it, what tools he needs, how hard it is, etc. Helps me to judge whether it's a $400 job or a $4000 job (for example)...

-Chris
__________________

__________________
Selby Bay, South River, Chesapeake Bay, USA.
ranger42c is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 31-03-2014, 10:55   #33
Registered User

Join Date: May 2012
Location: Western Wisconsin
Boat: O’Day Daysailer II, 17'
Posts: 572
Re: Charter Boats and engine life

Quote:
Originally Posted by GalaxyGirl View Post
The block heaters had both engines already warm when I arrived. Are these heaters kept on around the clock? Maybe its a winter thing? If the engines are started warm from block heaters, that doesn't count right?
If the cylinders are worn out or the valves leak, a warmed block may be the only way to get them running. Certainly start up when warm is quicker and less smoke. If you find a warm engine on inspection, a good mechanic should check the valves and cylinders with a compression test. Leak down type of test is most accurate.

You would want a compression test on the engines for any boat you are considering, but a warm engine would make me wonder, and if a boat is not used regularly then why the expense of keeping a block heater on all the time? It the engine is on a standby emergency generator or a fire engine where instant start up is needed, they yes. Otherwise, just plug the block heater in six hours before you want to start if the weather is really cold.
__________________
westwinds is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 31-03-2014, 12:58   #34
Moderator
 
a64pilot's Avatar

Cruisers Forum Supporter

Join Date: Oct 2013
Location: Albany Ga.
Boat: Island Packet 38
Posts: 17,024
Re: Charter Boats and engine life

I would think the block heaters were on because they were going to start the engines, big Diesels in cold Wx it's always best to pre-heat, it's easier on the engines and shows someone who is concerned for their engines.
You do NOT want to keep block heaters on all the time even if the electricity was free, because if left on , they will cause condensation in the engine.
If it were my engines and it was not Summer, I would pre-heat before starting, just a good thing to do.

I second the house boat first idea, a lot of house boats are great for living aboard, I mean it's what they were designed for wasn't it?
__________________
a64pilot is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 31-03-2014, 16:45   #35
Registered User

Join Date: Sep 2012
Posts: 777
Re: Charter Boats and engine life

ok, I didn't realize that the block heaters should not be kept on all of the time. Maybe the broker turned them on because he knew that he was going to start the engines for me (which he did).

I can appreciate the house boat suggestion, but the reason that I'm purchasing a boat is to cruise. House boats won't get ya no where.
__________________
GalaxyGirl
5KidsAndaBoat
GalaxyGirl is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 31-03-2014, 18:27   #36
Registered User

Join Date: Jun 2008
Location: seattle
Boat: Devlin 48 Moon River,j/100 BJ
Posts: 586
Re: Charter Boats and engine life

GG get out a chart and look at the cruising opportunities north of Seattle all the way to Alaska. The house boat would be a home base and a moderate sized common motor boat say 38-40 ft bayliner( with diesel motors) or that sort would be used for forays up north. Just trying to make some logic out of the situation.
__________________
eyschulman is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 01-04-2014, 15:07   #37
Registered User

Join Date: Sep 2012
Posts: 777
Re: Charter Boats and engine life

Quote:
Originally Posted by eyschulman View Post
GG get out a chart and look at the cruising opportunities north of Seattle all the way to Alaska. The house boat would be a home base and a moderate sized common motor boat say 38-40 ft bayliner( with diesel motors) or that sort would be used for forays up north. Just trying to make some logic out of the situation.
I could do a houseboat in Seattle or here in Boston or lots of places, but I would rather have a nice home that I can take anywhere. The goal is more of a cruising lifestyle in many locations, not just boating in one.
__________________
GalaxyGirl
5KidsAndaBoat
GalaxyGirl is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 02-04-2014, 12:31   #38
Registered User
 
rw58ph's Avatar

Join Date: Jun 2013
Location: Seattle WA
Boat: Roughwater, pilot house, 58 ft
Posts: 485
Re: Charter Boats and engine life

Be very careful when buying a so called house boat the is not fixed an connect to the sewer land. All the land under the water is zoned basically for 1) navigable vessels that can arrive and depart under their power or 2) fixed dwellings that do not move and are connected to the sewer. There is really no in between. Many true boat marinas do not take house boats and many fix house boats do not take boats. So make sure you understand what you are buying and where you can moor it.
__________________
rw58ph is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 08-04-2014, 09:06   #39
Registered User

Join Date: Aug 2012
Location: Northern Mn
Boat: S-2 9.2cc
Posts: 137
Re: Charter Boats and engine life

I used to run oil samples every oil change,just to see if there was a problem starting. One oil sample came back as always,no changes recommended. Same truck went out 2 days later and put a rod through the block and sent parts into turbo, completely ruining the motor as a parts motor,anyway. After tear-down, we could see that bearings had been gone quite awhile. So much for oil samples. They are as good as the person testing the sample,ie: some $6.00/hr. Tech who really don't care. Not saying all techs are this way, but who can tell? Get a magnetic sensor and rely on your own testing. Spend time looking/learning your equipment. Save the $50 or so for each sample and buy best filters available and pay attention. Motors will often tell you when something is wrong.
__________________
BobnCamie is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 09-04-2014, 14:48   #40
Registered User
 
meme's Avatar

Join Date: Jan 2013
Posts: 27
Re: Charter Boats and engine life

So then, in warm weather, 70 degrees+, would you still turn on the block heaters to warm the engines before start?
And how about in warm weather where the engines haven't been started for a while?
Or is this just a cold weather thing?
Thanks!

Quote:
Originally Posted by a64pilot View Post
I would think the block heaters were on because they were going to start the engines, big Diesels in cold Wx it's always best to pre-heat, it's easier on the engines and shows someone who is concerned for their engines.
You do NOT want to keep block heaters on all the time even if the electricity was free, because if left on , they will cause condensation in the engine.
If it were my engines and it was not Summer, I would pre-heat before starting, just a good thing to do.

I second the house boat first idea, a lot of house boats are great for living aboard, I mean it's what they were designed for wasn't it?
__________________

Our Blog
The warrior ship plows the waves, yet no hand grasps the tiller, none draws an oar. Oh mariner, surrender to the mystery. All else follows.
meme is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 09-04-2014, 19:18   #41
Registered User

Join Date: Jun 2008
Location: seattle
Boat: Devlin 48 Moon River,j/100 BJ
Posts: 586
Re: Charter Boats and engine life

GG the use of block heaters internal and external is a subject that entails lots of personal preference. In really cold climate situations a BH SX is almost essential. On certain motors a ignition preheater is standard to helps get a smooth start, but even here some people prefer to disable these factory systems. Internal block heaters when overdone can boil oil and cause oil problems. An external block heater properly sized to motor will keep engine compartment dry and motor warm enough to make oil flow well and maintain moderate metal temps. Since these units are usually just plug in, a simple AC timer can be used to cycle as desired. What cycle to use? Well now we start talking religion. You reads the different bibles and pick what you want to believe.
__________________

__________________
eyschulman is offline   Reply With Quote
Reply

Tags
charter, engine

Thread Tools
Display Modes Rate This Thread
Rate This Thread:

Posting Rules
You may not post new threads
You may not post replies
You may not post attachments
You may not edit your posts

BB code is On
Smilies are On
[IMG] code is On
HTML code is Off
Trackbacks are Off
Pingbacks are Off
Refbacks are Off


Similar Threads
Thread Thread Starter Forum Replies Last Post
Books on astral travel, OBE and life after life Fidar The Library 23 06-11-2013 21:14
Charter Boats and Autopilots oregonsailor Pacific & South China Sea 9 06-04-2011 13:02
Land Life / Boat Life Ocean Girl Families, Kids and Pets Afloat 59 14-06-2010 03:04



Copyright 2002- Social Knowledge, LLC All Rights Reserved.

All times are GMT -7. The time now is 04:32.


Google+
Powered by vBulletin® Version 3.8.8 Beta 1
Copyright ©2000 - 2017, vBulletin Solutions, Inc.
Social Knowledge Networks
Powered by vBulletin® Version 3.8.8 Beta 1
Copyright ©2000 - 2017, vBulletin Solutions, Inc.

ShowCase vBulletin Plugins by Drive Thru Online, Inc.