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Old 31-12-2007, 10:09   #1
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Question Cabin Heat for Southern Boat

Hello,
I am the proud owner of a Regal 2665. I have the boat in a slip, in the water. The boat is located in Nashville, and the typical climate allows us to enjoy boating up until December and we get out as early as March. During the winter months I would like to keep the cabin temperature above freezing at all times. (We may have a month of freezing weather). I have read the forums here and most folks discussions are for cold climates. Anyone have a suggestion on heating using shore power? The guy I the next slip is using one of those home style oil heaters...not interested in this approach...I have personally seen one of those electrical connection smoke! I have thought about a simple incandescent 100W bulb in a drop light...any comments are welcome.
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Old 31-12-2007, 11:50   #2
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You can sprinkle a few of these around:

West Marine: Goldenrod Dehumidifiers Product Display
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Old 31-12-2007, 12:41   #3
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Quote:
I have personally seen one of those electrical connection smoke! I have thought about a simple incandescent 100W bulb in a drop light...any comments are welcome.
Light bulb wiring isn't much better. I would share your concern about wiring. It's the number 1 cause of boat fires. It's not the heat from the source that starts the fire it is the extreme duty cycle imposed on wiring while heating in the winter. This problem can aso effect the wiring on board as well.

Light bulbs are not the best way to make heat in any event. They don't circulate so only a small point stays warm and all the area around it is prime for condensation damage.

With your application the period when the heat is on causes the air to absorb moisture and as it cools down it will condense. Condensation within the elctrical system is the source of your winter electrical nightmares. The desgn of the wiring needs to be robust enough to preclude this moisture from eventaully leading to a disaster. All "residential" hrsting applicances are not very good in this respect no matter how good there are for anything else. BoatUS lists the "Electric Oil heaters" as the number 1 fire hazard aboard.

I would by pass all your on board wiring and wire direct to the dock.

Heat pump type devices are probably better than radiant heating applications as far as danger is conserned. If you think about it any device that gets real hot isn't what you need because you only want the heat to be above freezing. Rapid cycles of heat and cold will condense more moisture.

For my own self I prefer to winterize and remain unplugged. Shore power is just always a potentail bad situation for all the same reasons it can be a problem heating in the winter. You can make winterization a lot easier where you live than the folks with sub zero low temperatures.
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Old 31-12-2007, 12:46   #4
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Central heat and air?
I did a gen and HVAC in a 2765 about a year ago. works great
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Old 31-12-2007, 17:12   #5
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The boat has marine air, (Taylor Made Marine Air System) but Im not real sure if it has the reverse cycle heat feature...
Thanks for the comments...
I went down to the boat today and the dock manager suggested I put a ceramic style heater, set on low, to maintain cabin temperature. He also suggested a heat lamp thermostatically controlled...He claims most of our neighbors are using the ceramic heater. Any comments or concerns for the ceramic style units?
Anything I do I want to run off my dock (shore) power plug using the 15A circuit.
Thanks for the comments about condensation...hadn’t gave that much thought....I will buy some desiccant for moisture just in case!
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Old 31-12-2007, 20:23   #6
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That system is what most folks use...you will most likely be very happy...one addition that I make is to clip small oscilating fans in the head and forward cabin...will put one in the lazette soon....airflow is key to preventing mold where I am from.

Using the low power setting should help with overheating the wiring...also I leave mine on, with the thermostat maxed at 700watts...this way there is no cycling.

Good luck.

Dave
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Old 01-01-2008, 05:07   #7
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If you use a Ceramic* Electric Heater, make certain it has two separate (independent) controls for Temperature & and Fan Speed, so that you can set the thermostat to low temperature, and the fan to high speed. This helps to keep the ceramic element from getting hot enough to start a fire, and increases air-circulation.

Look for these additional safety features that help prevent overheating
and minimize the risk of fire:
• A model that does not tip over easily, with an automatic shut-off (turns the unit off if it is tipped over). Some may have an alarm.
• An overheat sensor that shuts the heater off if the internal temperature gets too high.
• Adequate enclosures to keep out curious fingers (children).

A couple of “Made in China” Ceramic Heater RECALLS:


Collins International Co., Ltd., of Fair Lawn, N.J.
“Heat Wave” model EB38005

Lasko Products Inc., of West Chester, Pa.
2005 Model numbers; 5132, 5345, 5362, 5364, 5420, 5532, 5534 and 5566.

* The Ceramic Heater is produced using a specialised process which involves an alloy resistance wire around which is cast a ceramic body. This body is then glazed to protect it from moisture ingress. It also protects the heater from atmospheric and corrosive attack. The heating element operates at temperatures between 300C to 750C (572F to 1382F), producing a wavelength of 3-6 microns (Long Wave Infrared).
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Old 22-03-2008, 23:36   #8
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Gord May,
I just came across this gem of information from you - how do you know these things?!
Rez (impressed)
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Old 23-03-2008, 07:14   #9
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how do you know these things?!
We don't let him sleep at night.

If Gord May is looking for you there is no safe place to hide on the Internet. He finds needles in haystacks for the farmers in Ontario. They always seem to lose them.
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Old 23-03-2008, 08:53   #10
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No matter what type heater you use, it's the total current that matters.

The suggestion above of running on the lower power setting is a good way to avoid problems. Also make sure the water heater and any other high current device on the same circuit is off (of course I do that anyway when leaving the boat).

Another way is to use a 12 gauge extension cord that goes directly to the 110 outlet at the dock. The 12 gauge cord costs about $60 but will safely carry the full load of a 1500 watt heater. If your wire from the heater gets warm at all, you are approaching the danger zone. By touch, I can't detect any warmth at all from my 100' 12 gauge cord.

I would bet the fires from the oil heaters all come from the inadequate wiring on the boat or a combined load that's too high. That's why you should NEVER put in breakers that are higher than the circuit can handle.

-dan
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Old 23-03-2008, 09:15   #11
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Quote:
I would bet the fires from the oil heaters all come from the inadequate wiring on the boat or a combined load that's too high.
Actually it is both the boat and the heaters. Between the two it adds up to a huge problem. The heavy duty extension cord solves one of the problems. Using indoor heaters as outdoor applicanes is the other. The duty cycle eventaully gives out on these poorly made appliances usually about this time of year after a whole season of heavy use.
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Old 23-03-2008, 09:57   #12
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Also use a controller...

Gambler65


We had the same problem when we had Guenevere (our Nor'Sea 27) on a lake in Georgia.
I came up with an idea that may be of some help.


I went to the local Home Depot and bought a 110 volt heater control switch. It was only about $10.00 or so. I used a heavy duty extension cord to wire this up. It has one simple rotary nob on it and is only a small box (about 3 inches by 2 inches by 2 inch). I then controlled the heater (or drop light with 100 watt bulb). That way the system was off when the temp was above about 40 Deg F.


I wrote the thing up and it was published in an old copy of cruising world years back.


Hope this helps!


Greg
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Old 29-03-2008, 03:24   #13
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Cords

Quick caution about using power cords or extension leads. Make sure if there is any excess cord it is not coiled up. If it is wound inductively it will generate heat, and if the current flow is sufficient the coiled part of the cord will actually catch fire.
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Old 29-03-2008, 05:02   #14
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How about passive solar (for the day anyway) Erect an enclosure of black plastic. Don't forget vents.
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Old 29-03-2008, 06:49   #15
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Guy's this is a gas boat.
In good faith i couldn't recommend using a heater that's not ignition protected when away from the boat.
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