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Old 08-10-2019, 07:43   #1
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Are these true "coastal cruisers"?

Hi, I am new to the sight and new to larger boats.

I am interested in a few used boats that use the name "Costal Cruiser." They are the Bluewater 42 Coastal Cruiser and the Three Bouys 63 Coastal Cruiser.

I plan to live aboard full time on the California Coast, with possible trips up to the NW and down to Mexico.

Are these boats capable of this?

Thanks in advance for your advice.
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Old 08-10-2019, 11:26   #2
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Re: Are these true "coastal cruisers"?

Don't know about Three Buoys... but the Bluewater boats have a "certainly no rougher than coastal" reputation on the 'net. Not sure how much of that comes from actual owners or from the peanut gallery. Do a broad 'net search for reviews.

From the Bluewaters I've seen -- almost houseboat-like -- and from what I've heard of the West Coast situation, I don't think that's the "coastal" everyone had in mind. Comparatively speaking, the East Coast, and the ICW bail-outs, is much more benign.

There are several west coastie powerboaters on trawlerforum.com, a sister site to this one, and they could probably advise better.

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Old 08-10-2019, 16:16   #3
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Re: Are these true "coastal cruisers"?

Usually the term "coastal cruiser" is used as a shortcut for "not suitable for offshore passagemaking".

When the coast you're cruising is subject to such harsh conditions, maybe better to look for boats capable of being upfitted for bluewater, but in their current state not quite ready to go.

Better platform to start with, more wiggle room on the maintenance standards and can always get a bit more adventurous when you're ready.
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Old 08-10-2019, 17:07   #4
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Re: Are these true "coastal cruisers"?

Quote:
Originally Posted by carlazzomark View Post
Hi, I am new to the sight and new to larger boats.

I am interested in a few used boats that use the name "Costal Cruiser." They are the Bluewater 42 Coastal Cruiser and the Three Bouys 63 Coastal Cruiser.

I plan to live aboard full time on the California Coast, with possible trips up to the NW and down to Mexico.

Are these boats capable of this?

Thanks in advance for your advice.
Keeping a boat in Southern California and going out to Catalina and occasionally the Channel Islands, or keeping a boat in San Francisco Bay and surrounds is an entirely different use case than going up and down the Pacific coast to the Pacific Northwest. Different horses for different courses.
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Old 09-10-2019, 09:11   #5
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Re: Are these true "coastal cruisers"?

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Keeping a boat in Southern California and going out to Catalina and occasionally the Channel Islands, or keeping a boat in San Francisco Bay and surrounds is an entirely different use case than going up and down the Pacific coast to the Pacific Northwest. Different horses for different courses.
Thanks, but do you have specific information on the boats I mentioned?
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Old 09-10-2019, 10:38   #6
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Re: Are these true "coastal cruisers"?

carlazzomark:

Let's not beat around the bush :-) The answer is NO! Neither of the two boats you refer to are suitable for what you say you want to do.

The ThreeBuoys is a boat suitable for family vacations on benign lakes such as BC's Lake Okanogan. But it is at least an honest boat for doing that. SFBay can, I understand get snarly at times, and I wouldn't, myself, take one of these floating summer cottages out on the bay.

The Bluewater 42 falls between two stools, IMO. It is of a shape more like that of a power boat than is the 3Bs, but it is not IMO a competent cruising boat.

And that brings us to a observation that lies at the core of all marketing: In naming things to be marketed, marketing people invariably prevaricate.

You may take it, therefore, that a vessel marketed under the name "Bluewater Coastal Cruiser" is fundamentally unfit for use either on the open ocean or coastwise.

You say that you wish to go from SF to PNW. Be aware that that coast is considered one of the most dangerous in the world, and, to go a bit further, the west coast of Vancouver Island is known as the "Graveyard of Ships".

For all that, many people make that voyage. Many members of this forum have done so. It requires a suitable vessel and suitable experience. Neither of the vessels you mention would be up to it, and you, as potential skipper, could never gain suitable experience in either of them.

But despair not. Hang around here and ask appropriate questions of our membership, and you will soon begin to understand what it takes in terms of a vessel, in terms of experience and in terms of knowledge.

All the best

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Old 09-10-2019, 10:41   #7
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Re: Are these true "coastal cruisers"?

House boats for inland waters.
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Old 09-10-2019, 11:04   #8
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Re: Are these true "coastal cruisers"?

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House boats for inland waters.
Yep, we have a Bluewater in our Marina. It looks to be about 60 plus feet. Basically, a sporty looking houseboat. I wouldn't want to be anywhere in it where more than two foot waves were predicted. If it never left the protected parts of the ICW, it would probably be fine.

Other parts, with more open water, you'd have to wait for a good day to get me to do it.
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Old 09-10-2019, 11:05   #9
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Re: Are these true "coastal cruisers"?

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Originally Posted by carlazzomark View Post
I am interested in a few used boats that use the name "Costal Cruiser." They are the Bluewater 42 Coastal Cruiser and the Three Bouys 63 Coastal Cruiser.

I plan to live aboard full time on the California Coast, with possible trips up to the NW and down to Mexico.

Are these boats capable of this?
I know these waters well - in the late 1990's through the mid 2000's, I delivered many boats (mostly Nordhavns) along the coast, so probably have 30+ trips, mostly northbound. I know the Bluewater line as I gave some lessons on one once. Great liveaboard boats!

In general, any boat (within reason) can be moved along the Pacific Coast but some boats will require more planning and care than others - these two boats are quite a ways to the "great care and planning" end of the spectrum.

Here's why:

Heading north usually means either (a) waiting until October when there are often long stretches of relatively flat seas; or (b) sneaking through relatively short wx windows and sprinting to the next harbor (where you may get stuck for several days either by weather or current); or (c) accepting that you will get pounded by steep chop and enormous spray over the bow. (c) is probably not an option for two reasons: First, both of these boats have wide open spaces which is great for liveaboard which means its susceptible to flexing so I would not be surprised if the tabbing on whatever bulkheads there are would crack; or the windows would crack. Second, spray would likely be pretty intrusive into the living spaces. So while either one could be moved, it would be a ginger process, not one for normal outings. But they are great liveaboards so if you're okay with SoCal, would be a good time.

As others have suggested, you may want to go to the TrawlerForum.com list and pose a 'newbie wants advice' question. Rather than pre-suppose these boats, you may want to poll the talent on "I want a good liveaboard in SoCal, XX-feet long. I always wanted to see the PNW, but Mexico sounds nice too, so a decent coastal cruiser is a plus. Budget is around $YY,YYY. Thoughts?" Chances are you'll get a couple dozen responses and suggestions.

Good luck!

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Old 09-10-2019, 12:07   #10
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Re: Are these true "coastal cruisers"?

You talk about going to the Pacific NW. (I am based on Vancouver Island) first point is the 'standard route' from Central America up here is to sail to Hawaii then head north and round to come in across the Gulf of Alaska. That totals around 6000m of open ocean sailing. Taking the coast al route is 5000m of windward beating including the 'Baja Bash' and the Washington coast compression zone. Does not look much on the chart but it reacts like a major cape and can be a very nasty passage. Both those areas have few sheltered harbors accessible in rough weather so whatever come you way you need to be able to ride it out at sea. So no these boats will not hack it and you need a full spec ocean cruiser plus the experience need to be comfortable on passages of a few weeks in all weathers for the west coast.
'Coastal cruiser is a wide bracket and some are quite capable but I suggest you think of it as a boat intended for short passages of up to 60m undertaken in settled conditions between all weather accessible marinas. Much depends on the individual boat, equipment and crew and such boats have done much more than that but that is the essence of what they are designed for. The are few truly bad boats but to be safe and comfortable it is most important that you get a boat designed or adapted to you intended use. As a novice to this class of boat your best bet is to seek advice from a trusted and experienced person who can take you round a marina or show and explain the characteristics of different boats. Remember the sales person of brokers job is to sell you the boat they have NOT the one you want!!
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Old 09-10-2019, 13:49   #11
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Re: Are these true "coastal cruisers"?

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Yep, we have a Bluewater in our Marina. It looks to be about 60 plus feet. Basically, a sporty looking houseboat. I wouldn't want to be anywhere in it where more than two foot waves were predicted. If it never left the protected parts of the ICW, it would probably be fine.

Other parts, with more open water, you'd have to wait for a good day to get me to do it.
I think he will find a number of them listed on lakes. That appeared to be the market.
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Old 09-10-2019, 14:54   #12
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Re: Are these true "coastal cruisers"?

No, these are both essentially House Boats. The bow makes them only slightly more 'shippy' than a traditional houseboat. I would think they'd be better for inland cruising large lakes, rivers doing the inland portions of the Great Loop. They'd be fine for Bays, harbors and certain places on choice days.
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Old 09-10-2019, 16:11   #13
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Re: Are these true "coastal cruisers"?

Definitely not suitable for passage making. I'd say find something a bit more suitable. If your looking for a powerboat, I've known of a few Navigator 4800 make the trip to/from Mexico starting in Seattle.

Nordhaven would be my primary choice of vessel if I was going power over sail
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Old 10-10-2019, 00:09   #14
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Re: Are these true "coastal cruisers"?

I have power boat coastal cruising experience on both coasts, including the PNW, Southern California to Mexico and throughout New England. The boats youíre inquiring about are not seaworthy in conditions that regularly occur in these areas. They are fine for relatively small inland lakes and some rivers, in settled weather.
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Old 10-10-2019, 01:26   #15
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Re: Are these true "coastal cruisers"?

Greetings and welcome aboard the CF, Carla.
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