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Old 07-03-2010, 20:11   #256
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The thing with radar is the amount of electric you need to run them even on snooz mode. I chose the C.A.R.D system because it only uses mili amps. It comes to personal choise but I have a H/H GPS C.A.R.D system and all led lights and 1 x 80 watt solar panel. I have one Battery and can start the engine by hand. I know that we have a 10 hp engine.I have never run the engine for the sole purpose of charging the battery and spend alot of time at anchor. On our liveaboard boat we have all the bells and whistles but that is how she was when we bouht her. I will get around to changing all the systems but for now living on a small budget.
I don't understand tis post feelsgood. You have two boats? One you live on?
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Old 10-04-2010, 18:30   #257
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Hi there singlehanders,just a short one about continual lack of sleep. Doing a yacht delivery up the east coast of Queensland, Australia and getting about 4 hrs a night on anchor when decided to do a 30hr stint to a good marina and a chill out for a day when disaster almost became a reality. Due to lack of previous good sleep and 30 hrs of sailing with no autohelm as it burnt out 1st day, I was approx 1km from the breakwater entrance of the marina,with a good GPS on,reading and much needed sleep in sight, a fair amount of wind and overcanvassed but stayed with it to get in to harbour, when I noticed a flashing light of to Starboard and thought someone was flashing me with a torch as they were in trouble. This was at midnight and so decided to see the problem.Dropped the main and headed upwind with the jib so I could stop and render assistance if needed. Bloody hell,next thing I was bearing down on the buoy marking a rock and nearly hit the buoy and then just missed the rock tacking. This was the first time in thousands of miles of singlehanding to have sleep deprivation delusion nearly causing the loss of the boat and maybe my life. A big wake up call as you get a bit blasé after awhile. OH by the way I sleep for max of 30 mins overnight and sleep the next day in the cockpit in 1hr stints untill tirednes gone,of course this is with a WORKING autohelm, I now realise how much More effort is required to sail without one. MADE me give the sailors of the past sailing without them a greater understanding of their great achievments
Cheers Aussie
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Old 10-04-2010, 21:56   #258
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Aussie,
Thanks for shareing your experience,

One time I had to chase a stupid elephant off the foredeck of my boat!

sail safe and have fun

John
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Old 18-04-2010, 07:22   #259
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No new post for ten month! Much has happened on my boat during the last 12 months. I have a CARD and I must say it is the little "box" onboard that provides the best sense of real help for a lone (loony?) single-hander. The other item is a GPS coupled with a AIS receiver that plots my yacht and AIS transmitting (=large) ships in the area i.e. VHF range. Also very good and with few false alarms. I busy shipping lanes my little cabin sounds like a main-street gaming parlor! It sure keeps me awake. I have been avoiding radar due to the number of false alarms and the hunger for meager 12v resources. And cost, (especially installation) and they are ugly too.
however, the new "broadband" radars seem like the stuff of dreams... The start up in a flash and does not need anything near the power of "old" radars. Seems like the old mast-radom had a revolution similar to the nav-station cathode-ray scope making room for the smart LCD display unit. I am keeping a sharp lookout for a good deal on one of these, day and night.

Finally, electronics aside solo-sailing is not for the faint hearted. It has a lot to do with attitude that can never be explained to a landlubber. I remember a strange intoxicating feeling of freedom mixed with a magic sharpening of the senses. A typical solo-sailor becomes much more aware of what is going on around him, and much of it on a non-conscious level. You jump at things you are unaware of but something in your brain have triggered. This "state of mind" can be both enjoyable and a little frightening. I think you can't solo-sail and enjoy it if you don't have this ability of a heightened sensory level. Maybe it is confused with an imaginary sixth sense?

The human brain is the most amazing thing in the known universe and if given a chance it can blow you mind! Don't solo-sail to find out, but if you solo-sail you will probably get a whiff of it.
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Old 21-04-2010, 07:17   #260
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I guess sleeping isn't the only hazard...and not just for singlehanders. I suspect these guys had more than one aboard.

iPranged a submarine | The Sun |News

Dick Pluta
AEGEA
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Old 21-04-2010, 09:53   #261
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Ya just don't expect the submerged hazards to be comin' your way do ya?
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Old 22-04-2010, 13:04   #262
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Anything small - take a long time to chew and swallow each one.
Eating sunflower seeds keeps me awake. By the end of the shift, the place is covered with their husks.
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Old 22-04-2010, 13:19   #263
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So in conclusion, the best solution to the sailsleep problem is
1- an AIS system, and or
2- short catnaps
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Old 22-04-2010, 15:33   #264
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So in conclusion, the best solution to the sailsleep problem is
1- an AIS system, and or
2- short catnaps
No, the best solution is another watchkeeper
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Old 22-04-2010, 17:48   #265
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The best solution is to make the necessary trade offs between the need for sleep and the need to stand watch. These trade offs will be dependent upon the situation at hand, your own abilities, and the resources available to you.

Someday, hopefully in the not to distant future, there maybe AIS monitoring satellites to keep track of ships at sea. With such a system in place, shore-side watch-standers will be able to give you a call on the satellite phone whenever a ship comes over your horizon. Just don't forget to keep the battery for the phone charged.

Paul
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Old 25-04-2010, 09:36   #266
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V.S. we don't need a..."AIS monitoring satellites to keep track of ships at sea. With such a system in place, shore-side watch-standers will be able to give you a call on the satellite phone whenever a ship comes over your horizon." because something better is afoot. The AIS-B system that will give "little boats" the ability (obla-di obla-da obligation?) to broadcast their GPS data over a new AIS channel. In extremely busy areas (English Channel etc.) the "big ship" system will have "right of way" effectively shut down the AIS-B system so that the "big picture" does not risk being too cluttered.
The good news is that out at open sea (and almost all other situations near land) the two system will appear equal. The "big ships" will see the "little boats" with all important information (but less details than AIS-A) and ofcourse, neatly plotted on a AIS screen, maybe with radar and map overlay. Unlike radars this 2-way AIS system will provide for a allmost fool proof avoidance system for all traveling out at sea.
A small yacht with a AIS-B system will be able to do the same (plot all AIS equipped traffic on a screen) and it will b a heck of a lot more "blips" once the AIS-B system us available.
It will be able to interface with versatile laptop systems (=cheap!) using GPS navigation software. The extra "black box" will be able to use existing VHF antenna for Tx and Rx. The Tx power can probably be less then 5watt and this will be used in very short burst just a few times a minute. The extra power-consumption in terms of continuous drain / per hour will be of no consequence for a ocean-capable yacht - about same as a radio/stereo playing CD music.
Extra cost: Initially about $3,000.00 entry, but after 4-5 years probably incorporated with many VHF radios at a $500.00 extra cost and a USB-lead for your portable computer.
Whats the point? Well, a full coverage including all relevant vessels will minimize the dreaded human factor and make a future GPS/AIS based collision avoidance system virtually automatic.

AIS - wow! Another brilliant concept from the same Swedish genius that gave the civilized world the Computer Mouse as well as contemporary Computer Graphics! Who can that be?
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Old 25-04-2010, 15:19   #267
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AIS - wow! Another brilliant concept from the same Swedish genius that gave the civilized world the Computer Mouse as well as contemporary Computer Graphics! Who can that be?
The Linux penguin?
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Old 25-04-2010, 18:58   #268
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So in conclusion, the best solution to the sailsleep problem is
1- an AIS system, and or
2- short catnaps
I disagree...

In my opinion, the best solution for a solo sailor is:
1- Radar with alarm
2- AIS system with alarm
(I opted for an AIS - A system to make sure that the big boys cannot ignore me even in crowded conditions)
3- Lots of good sleep

Short sleep cycles over long periods of time will severly cripple your mental state and cause you to make poor decisions. Sleep is something to not scrimp on unless there is no other option period.
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Old 25-04-2010, 22:27   #269
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Maybe for Certain Situations?

Like, coastal hopping, when you have to do an overnight because there is no convenient anchorage…
New Drug Lets Soldiers Stay Awake & Productive for 40 hrs
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Old 26-04-2010, 00:33   #270
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Here is a quote from a M.D. and solo sailor:

"I did try modafinil once for a late-night drive from Alameda to Fresno. It kept me awake but I did not feel really good for 2 days afterwards. I have some aboard but would only use it if I had no alternatives and had to drive for 1-2 days just to get help."

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