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Old 31-12-2010, 09:33   #16
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Connemara View Post
Skabeeb: While spelling is not our strong suit on this forum, you are correct ... it is gybe.
Most American dictionaries will list jibe as a variant of gibe, and will note that the preferred British spelling is gybe.
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Old 31-12-2010, 09:55   #17
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Quote:
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Most American dictionaries will list jibe as a variant of gibe, and will note that the preferred British spelling is gybe.
LOL... not the first time I've come unstuck trying to talk American... try asking for a torch in a hardware store in NC and see what you end up with...
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Old 31-12-2010, 10:06   #18
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Many good answers, but then we all learnt at the same school; didn't we? I thoroughly agree with Gordmay. The time to reef is when it FIRST occurs to you. It's probably not going to get any easier later and shaking out early always goes better than reefing late.
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Old 31-12-2010, 10:25   #19
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Manfully resisting the temptation to make a jibe at the expense of American dictionaries......


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Old 31-12-2010, 10:40   #20
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My boat came with the Law that anytime REEF is mentioned then reefing happens, no matter who whats to reef or when. And there hasn't been one single time anybody was upset by reefing - even if sailing conditions continued to be fine. Sailing reefed is like having a different boat and it is nice (aka, fun) to learn about how the boat handles reefed when conditions don't demand it.

Anyway, sailing in perfect conditions is sooo overrated - sure it is "fun", but there isn't much to learn from that, and never any good stories.
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Old 31-12-2010, 10:45   #21
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We learned how to heave to and have used it to stop for lunch several times (and also when we approach on a man-overboard drill).

It never occured to me to simply heave to in the moment.
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Old 31-12-2010, 12:46   #22
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Haing just completed a asa sailing school I can identify with this story. Fortunately the last day of class we had 20-30kts gusty winds so got to practice a reef under fire. the next time I went out I just reefed as I put them up. I may spend the rest of my sailing career reefed. (well anytime its windy)
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Old 31-12-2010, 13:25   #23
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Haing just completed a asa sailing school I can identify with this story. Fortunately the last day of class we had 20-30kts gusty winds so got to practice a reef under fire. the next time I went out I just reefed as I put them up. I may spend the rest of my sailing career reefed. (well anytime its windy)

Reefer Madness for me for sure!! LOL!
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Old 30-01-2011, 17:27   #24
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Most of us have done something similiar and learned to reef early, then shake it out. We always heave to, in order to reef. It is calmer, easier and safer, at least that is how it seems to us. WE practiced this in light airs, moderate and heavy for no other reason than to practice. That practice was one of the best things we did. We learned how the boat behaved in varied conditions and we both knew what to do without any drama. Also gives one time to think and asses situations.
Keep on sailing, some things get easier, and I think one never stops learning...at least I hope to continue learning.
Fair Winds and have fun.
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Old 30-01-2011, 21:24   #25
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Once we came through the jybe, the wind hit the main hard which made the boat heal violently. She couldn't get the main sheet out of the cleat and the wind picked up at the same time!
I scanned the thread. The problem lies in this paragraph.

You can carry more sail downwind that you can upwind. You may not have needed to reef on a broad reach, while you may have to reef upwind.

The key on a gybe / jibe is to NOT cleat off the main. As soon as the wind crosses the stern and the main starts to fill, ease it quickly. This especially true on lighter boats like the Catalina 22. If you do not ease quickly the boat will round up and you will have more apparent wind. With a two person crew gybe the foresail after you get the main eased.

Chicken gybing may actually cause more problems as the boat will be over-canvassed as you head up and increase the apparent wind.
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Old 30-01-2011, 21:31   #26
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Re reefing.

Yes, if you ever ask yourself if you should reef the answer is yes.

Reefing while broadreaching can be difficult. There is a good chance sail slides will stick or jam. When you ease the main sheet and vang the sail will be hard on the spreaders. Extra care is needed to prevent a sail tear.

Most instructors teach reefing close hauled or close reaching. I was guilty of that until we had to reef downwind offshore.
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Old 31-01-2011, 06:58   #27
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So much to learn.

Who ever said that sailing is boring obviously never sailed!
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Old 31-01-2011, 07:09   #28
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Most instructors teach reefing close hauled or close reaching. I was guilty of that until we had to reef downwind offshore.
Theres the truth, as well as very few MOBs are taught in conditions that a MOB is likely, if they did I suspect the methodology would change

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Old 31-01-2011, 07:24   #29
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So much to learn.

Who ever said that sailing is boring obviously never sailed!
I prefer to think of it as "look at all the physical and mental activity I must perform consistently and conscientiously in order to MAKE it boring!"

I have to work like a dog sometimes to find that sweet spot that some would deem "boring" and I would deem "finally sailing effectively and in a balanced enough manner that I can relax" and just lay a couple of finger on the tiller".
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Old 31-01-2011, 07:58   #30
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One of the easiest Newbie mistakes is to be very happy with conditions runnig before the wind, not recognising that as wind increases, the boat speed has also increased, thereby reducung the apparent wind increase.

When you need to alter to close hauled, all of a sudden you are very much over-canvased, and should have reefed long ago.

It is a bit like running aground, we have all done it, but few own up to it!
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