Cruisers Forum
 


Join CruisersForum Today

Reply
 
Thread Tools Search this Thread Rate Thread Display Modes
Old 04-07-2018, 10:57   #31
Registered User

Join Date: Jan 2014
Location: essex england
Boat: 22ft falmouth oyster dredger.
Posts: 99
Re: Embarrassing story, seeking advice

hi everyone of us could tell similar embarrasing stories and we all know a mr or mrs perfect ignore it all keep learning youll get there if you persevere.
__________________

scallowayuk is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 04-07-2018, 11:14   #32
Registered User

Join Date: Feb 2016
Location: Lansdale, PA
Boat: Chrysler 22
Posts: 7
Re: Embarrassing story, seeking advice

As a Nockamixon Sailing School instructor told me: “Some days you watch the Circus and some days you ARE the Circus.” No problem if no damage or injuries. Enjoy it.
__________________

chasmains is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 04-07-2018, 11:42   #33
Moderator
 
roverhi's Avatar

Join Date: Aug 2005
Location: Kona, Hawaii, Carlsbad, CA
Boat: 1969 Pearson 35 #108 & 1976 Sabre 28
Posts: 6,470
Send a message via Yahoo to roverhi
Re: Embarrassing story, seeking advice

A keel boat is nearly impossible to turn turtle except in survival storm conditions. They find other ways to embarrass you. Smallish boats with center boards are not so forgiving. You learned in a fortunate way that you have to be aware in those types of boats and don't put yourself in that embarrassing position. For those of us that learned to sail in small boats, we've all had plenty of experience inverting the boat. I learned to sail on a Sailfish with a cotton sail. First time I went out the boat turned turtle and stuffed the peak of the sail into the mud. Had a brown stain on the peak of the sail that never went away for the 4 years of ownership. An embarrassing tribute to my sailing ability.

With the warm weather intentionally swamp the boat and practice righting it, bailing it out enough to get back on board, and get the moving again so the self bailer, if one is installed, will empty the water out or hand bail it and continue sailing. The exercise should take some forethought on how you're going to do it. FWIW thought every dinghy sailing course included intentionally swamping the boat and getting it sailing again.
__________________
Peter O.
'Ae'a, Pearson 35
'Ms American Pie', Sabre 28 Mark II
roverhi is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 04-07-2018, 12:11   #34
Registered User

Join Date: Jan 2018
Location: Annapolis, MD
Boat: Gemini 3000 (30')
Posts: 3
Re: Embarrassing story, seeking advice

You just passed your first quiz: You made a mistake, and realize that you need more instruction -- now GET IT. you are starting out in the very best place to learn how to sail , a small boat. When you can handle the boat on all points of sail, you will be able to graduate to solo sailing. Until then, have a qualified sailor with you.

Been there, done that
Rick
Sail2nite is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 04-07-2018, 12:45   #35
Registered User

Join Date: Sep 2007
Boat: GibSea 472
Posts: 396
Re: Embarrassing story, seeking advice

Quote:
Originally Posted by nwdiver View Post
Leave twitchy dingies to the kids......and you did learn from that now didn't you, I use to sail beach cats and flipped them once or more times when learning to sail.....keep at it if you can sail a dingy a keel boat is easier....
By going to larger keel boats, you will have the chance to experiment larger and more amusing snaffues. Like trying to get into your dock with cross wind and heavy current, and many other funy situations ... for the bystanders naturally!. That is called experience and you will acquire a lot of it, like the rest of us. Then slowly, you will start laughing at other less experienced camarades.
Elie is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 04-07-2018, 13:18   #36
Registered User

Join Date: Aug 2012
Location: Bowling Green, KY
Boat: Hunter 33
Posts: 3
Re: Embarrassing story, seeking advice

I learned to sail on a small flood control lake. I turned over my MC Scow on my first time out. The winds on the small lake change direction really quick, especially near a cove. I sailed that Scow and a 25’ boat on that lake for over 15 years before I started sailing the Great Loop. Sailing is much easier on the larger bays (as long as you watch the weather). Get back on it and hang in there.
dougmroberts is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 04-07-2018, 13:25   #37
Registered User

Join Date: Dec 2017
Location: Dana Point, Ca.
Boat: olsen / ericson 34
Posts: 282
Re: Embarrassing story, seeking advice

Best thing is to graduate on up to a substantial keel boat, since dinks with center boards or light weight keels are notorious for what happened to you. And, agree, most us us when sailing small center board sailing vessels have capsized.

I had not sailed dignys, until the following sea story...er, really a harbor story.

I originally joined a quality sailing club in Newport Bay and learned from the professionals and started out from jump street in Cal 25's, and the Newport 30's, Pearson 30, Catalina's , hunters Ericsons, and on up to 55 ft. Tayana's, with a huge mix in between.

Then I was given, no charge , a beautiful well found Capri 14 ( or 16 cannot remember ). It even had a roller furlering jib, and sail cover and protective boat cover. Very nice, I had in in a in Newport Bay. Now , this was years and years after I first began sailing, and was a licensed U.S.C.G. Capt. Yeah, well so much for that .

Having an easy to rig, little harbor sailor that we sail to the several Newport Bay marinas with guest docks and restaurants. Sounded like good fun.

Point being, no matter what , do not let one little capsize become the monster that killed your sailing dreams. Position yourself to windward and shake it off , lad. And have that mainsheet ready to run free.

Erica and I decided to take the Capris out for a harbor sail on a weekend. Winds no big deal, light, but gusting, and there lies the rub.

The original owner had a metal snap fitting for both Jib sheets, that was secured to the
clew of the jib sheet. Should have been bowlines.

We are sailing along, all is easy, Erica at the helm. A gust hits us from abeam....the wind speed increased and shifted direction from a gusty venturi between two of the on the harbor homes on Lido Island.

That metal snap hook slid across the starboard spreader, so I jump up and go to unhook the mickey mouse hook. I told Erica to Cut the Main Sheet since that gust was also increasing the heel rather quickly.

Well, she was a wee bit late on realeasing the main, I am up at the mast. WE ARE CAPSIZING..The boat is rolling

I just moved with the boat, my feet walking over from the side to the of the hull, that is now mast down, and centerboard up pointing at the blue sky. I am now standing on the bottom of the hull, Never even got wet. Looking pretty silly, however.

Erica is now in the water putting on her life jacket. She now has the main sheet run out and free. I had un- snapped the jib sheet hook just after the gust hit us.

Now, we are totally inverted with the mast pointed straight down toward the bottom of the channel. So, I try hauling on t he gunnel. leaning back while standing on the center board. Which looks like plywood, The boat does no budge.

Some friends come over in their dink, HI DENNY, YOU AND ERICA HAVING FUN ! HO-HO, HAR - HAR. Sure, but she does not want to come back up .

About that time, I am realizing the mast is flat stuck in the slime mud bottom of newport bay.

A 35 foot sailing vessel under power approaches, and one of the guys dives into the water and swims over to add some bulk weight along side me on the centerboard.

I could see that was not going to work, and only result in the light weight skinney center board breaking. So, his buddy hauls out a long line sheet, and the swimmer dives down to tie the line around the mast as low as possible to the head of the mast.

Full astern by the sailing vessel, and me on the center board, and eventually , the head of the mast pulls out of the mud.

I roll out the jib and sail back to the slip, Erica climbs into our friends inflatable dink and they cruise along. I will just dock under sail as usual. The 35 foot sailing vessel and crew followed along as well.

But, the day is not quite over. I did not want a tow, so I am sailing along, my vision is wiped out. WHAT THE HELL. A huge dark smelly glop of bottom mud that had lodged on the top of the mast and back stay. It all gives way, and a huge mud bomb hits me on the top of my head and is running down my face , eyes and neck.

More howling laughter, and I had join in with the merriment that I am producing for the rest of the harbor.

After I got the boat into the slip, we hualed out the fresh water hose, and hosed me , the mast, and the rest of the boat off.... The Capris was very light so I just hauled on the spreader and then the mast and careened in low over in the docks to clean up the mess and re-insert the shroud into the spreader. Also hosed of the sails and all was well.

Point being :

We walked over to the local pub for rums and good times.

We did not let that capsize situation bother us, but Erica learned to have that mainsheet ready to run and luff up.

We were used to heavier keel boats, and soon I became partners in a Ericson / Olson 34 that we often sailed over to Catalina and other ports along the southern california coast, I sold the Capri for ! 1000,00, and added in the small outboard that came with the boat but I had removed.

So, my friend, learn from you experiences, and if your dream is to sail larger vessels on more expansive waters....move on to get experience on those boats and the various systems, and more stability.

DO NOT GIVE UP !!!
Lihuedooley77 is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 04-07-2018, 13:51   #38
Registered User

Join Date: Jan 2016
Location: San Diego, CA
Boat: Beneteau 40.7
Posts: 156
Re: Embarrassing story, seeking advice

You will capsize from time to time in a sailing dinghy. It is important to maintain control of the situation so you don't get hurt or get knocked unconscious. Be wary of situations, like accidental jibes, where the boom can swing wildly. Often a sailboat will put the mainsail flat on the water for a short while before it turns turtle. This when to know if you can lean back in the hiking straps to right the boat or if that won't work. If the boat is going over, get clear of the straps and lines and gracefully enter the water.
I suggest you look on You Tube for capsize videos and think of what you would do in each situation.
thunderhoof is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 04-07-2018, 13:57   #39
Marine Service Provider

Join Date: Jun 2016
Posts: 268
Re: Embarrassing story, seeking advice

Quote:
Originally Posted by Lihuedooley77 View Post
Best thing is to graduate on up to a substantial keel boat, since dinks with center boards or light weight keels are notorious for what happened to you. And, agree, most us us when sailing small center board sailing vessels have capsized.

I had not sailed dignys, until the following sea story...er, really a harbor story.

I originally joined a quality sailing club in Newport Bay and learned from the professionals and started out from jump street in Cal 25's, and the Newport 30's, Pearson 30, Catalina's , hunters Ericsons, and on up to 55 ft. Tayana's, with a huge mix in between.

Then I was given, no charge , a beautiful well found Capri 14 ( or 16 cannot remember ). It even had a roller furlering jib, and sail cover and protective boat cover. Very nice, I had in in a in Newport Bay. Now , this was years and years after I first began sailing, and was a licensed U.S.C.G. Capt. Yeah, well so much for that .

Having an easy to rig, little harbor sailor that we sail to the several Newport Bay marinas with guest docks and restaurants. Sounded like good fun.

Point being, no matter what , do not let one little capsize become the monster that killed your sailing dreams. Position yourself to windward and shake it off , lad. And have that mainsheet ready to run free.

Erica and I decided to take the Capris out for a harbor sail on a weekend. Winds no big deal, light, but gusting, and there lies the rub.

The original owner had a metal snap fitting for both Jib sheets, that was secured to the
clew of the jib sheet. Should have been bowlines.

We are sailing along, all is easy, Erica at the helm. A gust hits us from abeam....the wind speed increased and shifted direction from a gusty venturi between two of the on the harbor homes on Lido Island.

That metal snap hook slid across the starboard spreader, so I jump up and go to unhook the mickey mouse hook. I told Erica to Cut the Main Sheet since that gust was also increasing the heel rather quickly.

Well, she was a wee bit late on realeasing the main, I am up at the mast. WE ARE CAPSIZING..The boat is rolling

I just moved with the boat, my feet walking over from the side to the of the hull, that is now mast down, and centerboard up pointing at the blue sky. I am now standing on the bottom of the hull, Never even got wet. Looking pretty silly, however.

Erica is now in the water putting on her life jacket. She now has the main sheet run out and free. I had un- snapped the jib sheet hook just after the gust hit us.

Now, we are totally inverted with the mast pointed straight down toward the bottom of the channel. So, I try hauling on t he gunnel. leaning back while standing on the center board. Which looks like plywood, The boat does no budge.

Some friends come over in their dink, HI DENNY, YOU AND ERICA HAVING FUN ! HO-HO, HAR - HAR. Sure, but she does not want to come back up .

About that time, I am realizing the mast is flat stuck in the slime mud bottom of newport bay.

A 35 foot sailing vessel under power approaches, and one of the guys dives into the water and swims over to add some bulk weight along side me on the centerboard.

I could see that was not going to work, and only result in the light weight skinney center board breaking. So, his buddy hauls out a long line sheet, and the swimmer dives down to tie the line around the mast as low as possible to the head of the mast.

Full astern by the sailing vessel, and me on the center board, and eventually , the head of the mast pulls out of the mud.

I roll out the jib and sail back to the slip, Erica climbs into our friends inflatable dink and they cruise along. I will just dock under sail as usual. The 35 foot sailing vessel and crew followed along as well.

But, the day is not quite over. I did not want a tow, so I am sailing along, my vision is wiped out. WHAT THE HELL. A huge dark smelly glop of bottom mud that had lodged on the top of the mast and back stay. It all gives way, and a huge mud bomb hits me on the top of my head and is running down my face , eyes and neck.

More howling laughter, and I had join in with the merriment that I am producing for the rest of the harbor.

After I got the boat into the slip, we hualed out the fresh water hose, and hosed me , the mast, and the rest of the boat off.... The Capris was very light so I just hauled on the spreader and then the mast and careened in low over in the docks to clean up the mess and re-insert the shroud into the spreader. Also hosed of the sails and all was well.

Point being :

We walked over to the local pub for rums and good times.

We did not let that capsize situation bother us, but Erica learned to have that mainsheet ready to run and luff up.

We were used to heavier keel boats, and soon I became partners in a Ericson / Olson 34 that we often sailed over to Catalina and other ports along the southern california coast, I sold the Capri for ! 1000,00, and added in the small outboard that came with the boat but I had removed.

So, my friend, learn from you experiences, and if your dream is to sail larger vessels on more expansive waters....move on to get experience on those boats and the various systems, and more stability.

DO NOT GIVE UP !!!

Hello Dooley


As it's about a 100 degrees over here on the Eastern Shore of Maryland, and I'm hiding in the air-conditioning instead of working on the boat, I'm moved to try to top that story with one even more humiliating. To wit: Many moons ago, our sailing club was having its annual regatta which included a round-the-buoys race in which all boat owners accepted any and all guests (up to the number of PFDs on board, of course) It was another hot and steamy Maryland summer day and after coming in second (darn it) we went back to the marina. To get the crowd off the Catalina as quickly as possible, I obliging undid the pelican hook on the port life line and after they'd all headed for the cook-out and beer, I went forward to get the bow lines and secure the boat in the center of the slip. In my usual fashion, I rested by knees on the life line to reach out to the piling, quite forgetting the aforementioned pelican hook. While an amazed audience of my "friends" looked on, I performed a graceful swan dive and belly flop over the side and into the murky waters of the marina (this was before the days of holding tank). While my appreciative fan club cheered me on, I thrashed around under the dock (I can't really swim, hence the boats) until eventually crawling out of the algae over the rip-rap seawall and slinking to the showers. I'm told they still talk about it at White Rocks Marina, but I don't go there anymore.



Top that!


John Mardall
Vetus Maxwell Boat Equipment.
JOHNMARDALL is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 04-07-2018, 14:00   #40
Moderator
 
Dockhead's Avatar

Cruisers Forum Supporter

Join Date: Mar 2009
Location: The boat: Cowes (Winter), Above 60N (Summer); me: somewhere in the air!
Boat: Cutter-Rigged Moody 54
Posts: 23,162
Re: Embarrassing story, seeking advice

Quote:
Originally Posted by Tillsbury View Post
The whole point of 15-footers is to capsize them. Honestly, if you aren’t capsizing then you aren’t trying hard enough nor learning much.
. . .
This

Quote:
Originally Posted by thunderhoof View Post
You will capsize from time to time in a sailing dinghy. It is important to maintain control of the situation so you don't get hurt or get knocked unconscious. Be wary of situations, like accidental jibes, where the boom can swing wildly. Often a sailboat will put the mainsail flat on the water for a short while before it turns turtle. This when to know if you can lean back in the hiking straps to right the boat or if that won't work. If the boat is going over, get clear of the straps and lines and gracefully enter the water.
I suggest you look on You Tube for capsize videos and think of what you would do in each situation.

Great advice!

Quote:
Originally Posted by boatpoker View Post
I agree with everyone's responses ... it's no big deal ..... if you haven't tipped a dink you're not trying hard enough.... it's how you learn etc.

BUT ....

I think a 50yr. old male who gets so unnerved by falling in the water from a height of 6" may want to consider another hobby. If you are not comfortable with what you are doing ..... do something else.
This is a bit rude, in my opinion, but with a fundamental truth underneath it --

Capsizing a dinghy sailer is nothing at all. Nothing at all to be embarrassed about. But at the same time -- nothing at all to be afraid of, and the fear in the OP is the only thing I would be concerned about.

I would suggest going out and capsizing it again, and see if you can feel more comfortable this time. Wear swim clothes. Sailing is a WATER sport, and in small dinghies, actual contact with the water is inevitable. Dinghy racers -- top pros -- wear dry suits, if you get my drift.

Then when you can feel that it's not a big deal to overcook it and go into the water, then just go out and sail the bejeezus out of it. Dinghies are great fun and a great learning experience.
__________________
"Parce que je suis heureux en mer, et peut-tre pour sauver mon ame. . . "
Dockhead is online now   Reply With Quote
Old 04-07-2018, 14:04   #41
Registered User
 
Macblaze's Avatar

Join Date: Nov 2013
Location: Edmonton/PNW
Boat: Hunter 386
Posts: 717
Re: Embarrassing story, seeking advice

Quote:
Originally Posted by Olly75 View Post
Don't worry about it, in eight hours of sailing a laser (the forst small boat I've ever sailed) I've capsized 17 times.

I work on the theory if you don't capsize you're not trying hard enough, it's also nice to cool off.
This! We used to dump the lasers regularly. Occasionally we would just turtle it and sunbath on the hull.

The hard part come slater when learning to trust that big keel boat won't dump you in the water regularly (unless you really, really, really do something bad).
__________________
---
Gaudeamus igitur iuvenes dum sumus...
Macblaze is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 04-07-2018, 14:05   #42
Registered User

Join Date: Dec 2016
Location: San Francisco
Boat: between boats
Posts: 101
Re: Embarrassing story, seeking advice

Quote:
Originally Posted by Lihuedooley77 View Post
About that time, I am realizing the mast is flat stuck in the slime mud bottom of newport bay.



I was going to post the same. I started off sailing in my mid teens on a little 11" Sunfish - not even a Laser :-( I flipped it over one time just off the crowded main beach at the little lake I was on in suburban Detroit. No problem right? Except the bottom was shallow and the mast was stuck in the mud. Felt like it took me an hour to right the boat, of course right in front of everyone. I realized after getting it back up that the mainsheet was still cleated so I'd also been fighting the waterfilled main as well.



Capsizing the boat was always a fun way to cool off and relieve any boredom, especially if I had someone along who wasn't expect it :-)




Joe
aquadreams is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 04-07-2018, 14:41   #43
Registered User

Join Date: Sep 2016
Boat: Montgomery 23
Posts: 72
Re: Embarrassing story, seeking advice

Quote:
Originally Posted by ppvora View Post
Hello All,
I'm a 56-year old (male) college professor. In late August 2016, I took the ASA 101 course at a sailing school on the Chesapeake Bay and (easily) passed it. Since then, I haven't had much of a chance to go sailing due to various factors. However, this year, I decided to get a season pass at the boat rental place at the local lake. The local lake is a tiny "man-made" lake (they built a dam to fill up a depression in the land). My intention was to grab the centerboard day sailers (15 footers) they have there, to practice my basic sailing skills, then probably next season find a reasonably-priced second-hand boat and go sailing on the Chesapeake Bay....maybe more in the future.

However, a certain incident occurred that has kinda' scared me a bit: The first time I went out, the wind at the local lake was going 7-8 knots with gusts of upto 10. I went out maybe 0.5 NM and turned in such a way that the boat keeled over on the side that I was sitting. In a split second I was thrown overboard and the boat flipped over with me underneath. I was wearing my life-jacket, and without realizing it even, I was able to raise the hull and come out from underneath. The boat rental center takes safety very seriously and they always have one person as a lookout for all their rentals that go out. They saw me and two persons there jumped into a motor-boat and were at my side in no time. They pulled me onto their boat.

I think I'm a fairly risk-averse person and, generally speaking, like to err on the side of safety. For example, in my 38 years of driving, I have never received a ticket for a moving violation.

Later that day the following emotions ran through me:
1. Depression: "This is the end of my sailing career -- even before I seriously started."

2. Extreme embarrassment: "Those guys at the rental place are laughing their asses off thinking about the old fool who thought he knew how to sail. How will I even make my way there again?"

3. Fear: "Wow, that was closest I've come to within inches of my life."

4. Fear (another type): Of getting verbally chewed out by The One Who Must Be Obeyed. [She didn't]

Anyway, I'm writing to seek some advise and encouragement. Is an event like this unusual? Was I foolish? I kinda' like to be by myself sometimes and it's unlikely (if I ever make it to owning a real sailboat) that I will sail the Chesapeake with others -- this is MY thing. Besides, The One gets seasick if she even sees a boat, so no chance of convincing her to join in the fun.

Any advice, stories, encouragement, even discouragement ("You fool, it's people like you who give sailing a bad name!") is appreciated provided it's honest.

Thank-you all.
-Premal
Sounds like fun! If you haven't tipped over a day sailor or a sailing dinghy, you haven't really been sailing. I know it's a considerably more embarrassing when it's:1) a rental and, 2) they see you do it.
And I can tell you they see it all the time.
Although I'm a risk-taker myself, (lifelong motorcyclist, skydiver, etc.) I understand that it's good to be cautious and have a little fear. But none of us will be getting out of here alive, and it's fun to balance risk against the reward.
Being on the water is risky. Being at sea (even the Chesapeake) more so.
But how exciting and challenging it can be!
And, each time you dump a sailboat it's a learning experience, right?
If you capsize a keel boat, perhaps another lesson would be in order...
If you take perhaps one more ASA class you'll see that things happen a lot more slowly on a keel boat, and while boo-boo's around docks, other boats, etc. can be unfortunate, on the water they are quite comfortable.
As far as 'giving sailing a bad name', well, there are countless rum-swilling wretches out there who have been doing that for centuries. You and I together
(especially at our ages) haven't a chance.
I often laugh at some of the things I see sailing, but I'm laughing (usually to myself) at the embarrassing situation, not at the skipper or crew. And while I'm chuckling I'm also thinking, "Sheez. I hope I never do that!"
You are a lucky man to have the energy, and enthusiasm needed to pursue such a strange, lovely sport. Or lifestyle as the case may be.
Keep it up.
rmlarson1098 is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 04-07-2018, 15:25   #44
Registered User

Join Date: Aug 2010
Location: sydney, australia
Boat: 38 roberts ketch
Posts: 1,149
Images: 3
Re: Embarrassing story, seeking advice

respect to you for taking on the learning process in a proper way - capsizing in small boats is absolutely the best way to learn how to sail, gain intimate knowledge of the relationship between sails and the wind, gain confidence on the water - or in the water. Your slight misfortune is where many of us have the luck to have learned these robust lessons at an early age, you are doing it as an adult, which is probably a bit confronting.
In my case there was a fairly large gap between my childhood and early adult experience sailing, and my at-the-time 54 yr old re-introduction on a 38 ft ketch, and the first few times things got a bit out of control were pretty exciting - I'd lost the physical sense of mastery over a boat in the time away and had to re-learn a great deal.

My encouragement to you is not to be discouraged - once you gain a sense of the physicality of the process of managing a sailboat, you will start to enjoy yourself, and eventually become a hopeless addict, as are many of the correspondents on this forum.
charliehows is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 04-07-2018, 15:26   #45
Moderator
 
Jim Cate's Avatar

Join Date: May 2008
Location: cruising SW Pacific
Boat: Jon Sayer 1-off 46 ft fract rig sloop strip plank in W Red Cedar
Posts: 13,878
Re: Embarrassing story, seeking advice

Ahoy, ahoy ppvora!! Where are you? You've had some really good responses upthread, so now it's your turn again. Let us know if we've helped, hindered or confused you.

Jim
__________________

__________________
Jim and Ann s/v Insatiable II lying Sandy Bay, Hobart,
Jim Cate is online now   Reply With Quote
Reply

Thread Tools Search this Thread
Search this Thread:

Advanced Search
Display Modes Rate This Thread
Rate This Thread:

Posting Rules
You may not post new threads
You may not post replies
You may not post attachments
You may not edit your posts

BB code is On
Smilies are On
[IMG] code is On
HTML code is Off
Trackbacks are Off
Pingbacks are Off
Refbacks are Off


Similar Threads
Thread Thread Starter Forum Replies Last Post
Entering or Leaving Slip . . . Most Embarrassing Moment otherthan General Sailing Forum 21 12-05-2015 14:32
Poo-Pourri, For Those Embarrassing Smells. Coops Off Topic Forum 10 20-08-2014 03:53
Embarrassing Blunder in Etiquette Misiu Meets & Greets 6 20-04-2010 07:33
Embarrassing heat exhange problem Galatea Engines and Propulsion Systems 3 20-08-2008 15:10
Your most embarrassing incident at sea Gludy Multihull Sailboats 3 11-07-2008 03:18



Copyright 2002- Social Knowledge, LLC All Rights Reserved.

All times are GMT -7. The time now is 14:10.


Google+
Powered by vBulletin® Version 3.8.8 Beta 1
Copyright ©2000 - 2019, vBulletin Solutions, Inc.
Social Knowledge Networks
Powered by vBulletin® Version 3.8.8 Beta 1
Copyright ©2000 - 2019, vBulletin Solutions, Inc.

ShowCase vBulletin Plugins by Drive Thru Online, Inc.