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View Poll Results: Oops, I made this mistake . . .
Didn't pay attention to the weather forecast 87 27.10%
Ran aground - had to wait on the tide 80 24.92%
Ran aground - got off by myself 191 59.50%
Ran aground - had to be pulled off 70 21.81%
Hit the dock 113 35.20%
Hit something else (another boat, etc.) 58 18.07%
Anchor didn't hold, drifted into something 44 13.71%
Boat sank at the dock 10 3.12%
Boat sank, not at the dock 8 2.49%
Had a fire 24 7.48%
Multiple Choice Poll. Voters: 321. You may not vote on this poll

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Old 22-12-2007, 12:48   #151
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I guess I ignored my first weather forecast this morning. Everything up to last night said it should be a great day. This morning's forecast was less hopeful, but we decided we could try it anyway. I got out there and I could feel wind in the marina, something that almost never happens. I go ahead and put one reef into the sail but hank on the working jib anyway. Even the relatively protected waters of bayou chico had a few waves when it's normally glass or just ripples no matter the conditions. We make it out into pensacola bay and as soon as we're out of the channel. BAM BAM BAM pounding right into 3-4 foot waves.

Small craft advisory was supposed to go into effect at noon, this was only 6 am. They should have pushed the advisory up a bit.

We make the turn downwind and start the 30 mile trek from the marina to our house. Things aren't so bad downwind. But then we get farther out into the bay and the waves start making us nervous. Neither one of use wants to chicken out and turn back, but eventually after about 2 miles of sailing in what was probably 20 knot winds, we turn back towards the safety of the bayou and the dockage of the marina. The marina is directly into the wind. We make no attempt to sail at this point and just motor straight in. The little 6 horsepower tohatsu at full throttle is barely making way. It took us 20 minutes to get out to our turnaround point, but another 40 to get back in pounding through the waves.

The boat took it great, she probably could have made it, but this was yet another case of the crew breaking before the ship. We came back shivering, salty, soaked, and sleepy after only an hour of sailing, if you could call it that. Still, if I had tried to make the 6-7 hour trip under those conditions we would have been worse off.

I guess I should have taken the hint after the forecast said it was bad, it looked bad, and that we saw absolutely nobody else out there other than a bit of commercial traffic, on a Saturday.
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Old 22-12-2007, 13:15   #152
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Hey sluissa,

I don't think you made a mistake going out you are gaining more knowlage and expierance. Remember "nothing ventured, nothing gained".

Paul
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Old 22-12-2007, 20:14   #153
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Sluissa, it sounds like you did everything right. You listened to the forecast, took steps in case it was wrong, and when you found the ride more of a punishment than you wanted, you cut it short & came back in.

I'd call that prudent seamanship AND a great way to gain experience, because if you never go out in "too much" weather, you never get used to it and never learn how to handle it.

That's the difference between sailing and combat: In sailing, you're allowed and encouraged to say "I'm going back, we'll do this some other time."
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Old 23-12-2007, 00:34   #154
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You were in a Kingfisher 20? Nothing wrong with your choices at all. Much better to wait for a nicer day
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Old 23-12-2007, 06:21   #155
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Here is a lesson: Tagged along on a friend's steel 100' charter boat, hitching a ride. Paying crew members were not advised that there were two types of outlets, one 110 and one 220. One plugged in small applicance to wrong outlet, and when it didn't work, just left it plugged in, sitting on bed and walked out of cabin. Your guessed it, item fried, bedding caught fire. Luckily, old steel boat had steel lined cabins, so fire was contained and put out, but was quite a heart beater, happening in 3000 feet of water 30 miles off shore. LESSON LEARNED: Brief all passengers fully and lable potential trouble spots before hand. THis may sometimes be hard to do effectively with close friends and relatives, but you can see how easy and innocent this was to almost sink the boat. A fiberglass yacht would have been toast.
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Old 23-12-2007, 07:02   #156
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Quote:
Originally Posted by waterworldly View Post
... there were two types of outlets, one 110 and one 220. One plugged in small applicance to wrong outlet, and when it didn't work, just left it plugged in, sitting on bed and walked out of cabin.
LESSON LEARNED: Brief all passengers fully and lable potential trouble spots before hand.
Whilst true about briefings, it should also be noted (in this specific case), that the root cause was improper wiring devices.
All receptacles must be appropriately configured to their voltage and amperage rating, such that it will be impossible to insert a 110v V (for example) appliance cord into a 220V receptacles (etc).
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Old 23-12-2007, 10:37   #157
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Quote:
Originally Posted by GordMay View Post
Whilst true about briefings, it should also be noted (in this specific case), that the root cause was improper wiring devices.
All receptacles must be appropriately configured to their voltage and amperage rating, such that it will be impossible to insert a 110v V (for example) appliance cord into a 220V receptacles (etc).
I once saw a disaster like that waiting to happen, but when I pointed it out to the boat owner, he just laughed. He told me how much money he saved by using standard 120 volt duplex sockets throughout the boat for both 120 and 12 volts instead of the "overpriced marine stuff". He insisted he knew which ones were which even though there were NO labels on any of them. The whole boat was one big mickey mouse mess in every way so I wasn't surprised at his answer.

Steve B.
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Old 27-12-2007, 20:50   #158
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First time trying to get out of marina, living opposite fishing charter boat that had just returned from day trip with a boat load of beer laden, flannel wearing "yobbo's". Thought we had done everything, untied lines, put in reverse and wouldn't go. So upped the rev's and just drifted across towards airberth next to us... Then one of the guys across from us yelled across "you would go further if you untied the bowline!" Well we didnt hit anything but man that was embarrassing.. Always untie both bowlines now... he he!
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Old 13-01-2008, 14:11   #159
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I ran aground by trusting my navigation software alone. My older version of Nobeltec VNS was using tide information for January 8 on August 1. It told me that I had 8 feet under the keel just as the rock that I hit told me I had nothing. We bounced back off the rock and took the long way round.

I learned the valuable lesson that charts and tide tables work better than computers.
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Old 10-02-2008, 13:09   #160
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We went for a family holiday in our 9m trimaran up the UK East Coast. Sure enough, on day 4 in a marina my daughter advised me "Dad, there is something wrong with the toilet!" - yes, it was blocked.

So, next morning's HW being at 0200hrs, at aprrox. 0600hrs we put our boat on the mud flats just outside the harbour, about 10m outside the buoyed channel, and awaited the tide to sink so that I could effect repairs after she had take ground (one advantage of a trimaran) - but boy did we get stared at by all those "knowing" folks motoring into and out of the marina!

The rest of the holiday turned out fine, and with a working toilet!

Roger
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Old 18-02-2008, 12:56   #161
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Grounding, anchor rode wraps, almost dock sinking

I'm new to these forums. I figure I might as well go ahead and get this part out of the way... (I actually posted some of this in another thread)

It was April. First time with a boat over 16', I bought a wood 36' 1966 Pacemaker in New Jersey. First time navigating a long trip, I was going over 900 miles. We planned everything. 2 permanant VHFs, one handheld, permanant GPS, portable GPS, paper chartkits, stobe lights on our PFDs, contact on land to report status to, etc. But I didn't spend enough time learning my GPS. We left Barnegat Bay for the open water to make the run down to Cape May. It was too rough for us to be comfortable in a 36 year old wood boat with only 4 hours experience in her, so we headed back inside. Once we got towards the South end of Barnegat, the channel narrows. At one point there is over a mile between markers with a channel only about 30' wide. Since I hadn't figured out how to activate a route, I could only see the waypoints on the screen of my non-charting GPS. As you might guess, with the wind and current, towards the middle of this leg, we ran aground. I had absolutely no idea which side of the channel I was on. Luckily there was a full keel on that boat and we were still floating. I just shut her down and waited. She spun around lazily and within about 2-3 minutes floated free back into the channel. Totally by luck. That night at anchor, for some strange reason I decided figuring out those esoteric features on the GPS was a good use of time.

A few days later, on the upper Chesapeake, we pulled out of the channel into 20' of water to have a leasurely lunch. There was a strong tide, but the anchor held well. When we started to leave, the windlass wouldn't pull the anchor up with all that current, so I put it into gear and carefully took some of the pressure off the line. OK, so in retrospect, seems like I took all the pressure off, and then some. You got it. Wrapped around the shaft. We tried pulling, bumping reverse/forward, no dice. I let out some line so we could pull the end around to the side near the stern. We tried some more. This was in April, remember? Cold? Cold air and really cold water. I tired for all I was worth to find a reason that Joe should be the one to dive in and untangle. Let's see. My boat. I got it tangled up. Hmm, that's not working out. I started taking off the storm gear, contemplating what it was going to feel like once I got to the underwear stage. One more try with a pull and a gear bump. It came loose! Not only was the anchor still there, we couldn't even find any frayed places in the line. Just luck it didn't tangle with the wheels. And I didn't have to get wet!

OK, one more. Almost sank at the dock. My current boat had leaky shaft logs. Not too bad, but the bilge pump would come on for about a minute every 45 minutes. Just enough so the leak was a stream instead of drips. To be fixed at next haul-out. Well, the story is some of the people there say they caught some kids running down the dick flipping circuit breakers. I normally check the boat every 2 weeks (it's 350 miles away), but this time it was 3 weeks. Well, the bilge pumps ran down the batteries and then the engine compartment started filling up. Luckily it's diesels and the water didn't get above the exhaust manifolds, and just missed the alternators, so after new starters, new batteries, re-wiring (most of the wiring was above water level) the big thing damaged was the genset. Lesson learned? Give phone number to all my neighbors. They told the marina staff, but nobody called me, even though I had given them 2 numbers for myself and one each for my buddy and my father.
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Old 23-03-2008, 10:23   #162
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Kids like that are good (lightly salted and roasted on a spit)
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Old 25-03-2008, 13:21   #163
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okay,

Bit of background first. Grew up with powerboats for fishing as a young child on Saginaw Bay and Houghton Lake in Michigan.

1# Beware Sea grass

We were fishing in Houghton and it is a very shallow lake that generates 5 pm thunder showers like clockwork during the summer months and has large patches of sea grass that is great for Lake Bass and some of the Larger Predator fish on the Lake. Also great for some huge Pan fish as well. You have to be careful in turning around near it though as the prop can catch that stray strand and you are going to be going over board to cut it free sure as anything.

Well the second time my grandfather let me at the controls of the boat as we were getting all the gear in to get to the dock before the rain let loose. As I gently turned the boat around, my brother; yep blame the younger brother, bumped my arm and that hand happened to be holding the throttle and you can guess where this went from there. The hard part was the look my Uncle and Dad gave us (Grandma backed my story, as she said she saw the Brother do it but not on purpose), when my uncle had to go over real quick to cut the weeds free of the prop so we could get in (it was than sprinkling, so no way to beat the rain).

2# Grounding in the Bay

I had just gotten my power boat permit and a friend's dad let us use his 25' power boat (don't remember the model only that it had the pass through spray shield for a forward area for sitting in). I had forgot to turn on the depth/fish finder as I though that it shouldn't be that hard to get over to the State Park (Bay City has a wonder State Park that you used to be able to anchor right off of without a problem from the Rangers). Saginaw Bay has mobile sand bars due to the number of rivers that empty into it and the currents this causes. Well in trying to avoid one of those new fangled jetski/jetbikes (this was late 80's), not only did I put it up on a sand bar, but managed to side swipe the boat on to it. Half the bow and two thirds of one side of the boat were on it and the jarring stop we came let everyone around know that it was not intentional. It also did not help that it was right in front of the State Park and we had a Ranger out in no time and asking to se permit and all. Which than we had to prove we had his Dad's permission to be using it as well (luckly Dad thought ahead and had given us a letter stating such, unlucky we were a bit stuck and now on the keep an eye on list for the rangers). Lesson learned that time, use the equipment provided, go at a speed that is safe to the area at all times and carry less guys so you have more space for any lasses that would like to go for a ride out on the bay (since married and wife is looking forward to sailing)

There are one or two more kicking around the head but I don't think rafting mishaps on a river count do they??
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Old 01-04-2008, 14:08   #164
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grounding a zodiac..
how to nearly lose a big zodiac on a paradise beach..

everybody onboard is dead asleep
beeing always "up" at the crack of dawn , off i go , take the big zodiac with a big heavy engine and go exploring the island, we arrive late last evening ..so i love waking up and exploring new places..
the beach is still deserted as the sun is just piercing over the hill..
feeling like "Columbus" i pull up the zodiac as far as i can on the beach ( not far !) and off i go exploring....
but when i came back , just like 30 minutes later ( i think)
the waves where filling up the zodiac and the tide coming up fast over the transom, and filling the zodiac with sand too !!!!!!!!!
i could not move the thing..
and could not bail fast enought , no having anything to bail with anyway....
S---- i could see the beautifull rig ( like brand new zodiac and engine ) going to be floaded and wet and full of sand very quick...and it is not mine , we where just delivery a million dollars motor boat...
and you know this feeling " when you thing all is lost .." and you should have know better ..

as an devine apparition ..
here comes a tractor ( the one who come early in these resorts islands to clean the beach )..
must be the French accent again , or the fast i was just around 27 , with long sun bleach air and olive skin..
the guy got few people and with the tractor , we safe the zodiac..

i went back onboard , they all still dead asleep ..
i never told them ...
but i learn my lesson ..
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Old 01-04-2008, 14:15   #165
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phone number

my phone number is on big letters on the door of the compagnion way of my boat..
and i always people to do the same ..

by experience too , it can save time and money and "sinking feeling"
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