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Old 15-10-2014, 20:03   #31
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Re: Did It Yet Again :Banghead:

Found this idea on a posting somewhere and it worked for me. A PITA to get the key each time, but it worked.

How about tying a piece of string, tie-wrap, etc on the key and hang the key one the seacock.
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Old 15-10-2014, 20:07   #32
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Re: Did It Yet Again :Banghead:

Nope, never done it. But, our boat is always left on the hard when we're away.
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Old 15-10-2014, 20:19   #33
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Re: Did It Yet Again :Banghead:

Quote:
Originally Posted by Island Time O25 View Post
The marine pros I'm learning from all tell me the seacocks and hoses should be in such condtion as not to be afraid to leave them open unless there is a severe storm warning or some such. Otherwise they'd be suspect while underway. And we wouldn't want that, would we?

Their basic premise is this. What is the difference, safety wise, in us leaving the boat for a week or sailing for a week non-stop?
These "pros" are not teaching you good habits in my opinion. Risk is an issue many don't really comprehend. The probability of a failure should be balanced against the consequences of the failure (google FMECA) and the cost to avoid the risk. I can think of no reason not to close the sea cocks. In fact, regular use helps keep them from seizing in my experience and makes it less likely one will forget.

Yes, the rest of the system should be well maintained and components replaced per recommended schedules. However, even the best maintained system can fail. And in this case failure means loss of the boat in less than a day (possibly even an hour). If you are onboard it is fairly simple to stem the flood but if no one is on board then the boat will surely be lost. So do whatever you like but imagine how stupid you would feel if the boat sank while no one was on board.
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Old 15-10-2014, 20:38   #34
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Re: Did It Yet Again :Banghead:

So if a seacock goes, how quickly will water come in? More than a bilge pump can handle? Or is it more a question of the bilge pump failing or running out of power?

Just curious.
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Old 15-10-2014, 20:43   #35
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Re: Did It Yet Again :Banghead:

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Originally Posted by FlyingCloud1937 View Post
someone is onboard when cruising.

someone is not onboard when away.






I agree that things should be inspected well enough on a regular basis, as to be able to find a hose that might fail.

But I also am aware of situations, where the person left expecting to return, and something got in the way...and the return didn't happen for years.

Lloyd
In that case I guess the person wouldn't care if anything happened to the boat.
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Old 15-10-2014, 20:52   #36
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Re: Did It Yet Again :Banghead:

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These "pros" are not teaching you good habits in my opinion. Risk is an issue many don't really comprehend. The probability of a failure should be balanced against the consequences of the failure (google FMECA) and the cost to avoid the risk. I can think of no reason not to close the sea cocks. In fact, regular use helps keep them from seizing in my experience and makes it less likely one will forget.

Yes, the rest of the system should be well maintained and components replaced per recommended schedules. However, even the best maintained system can fail. And in this case failure means loss of the boat in less than a day (possibly even an hour). If you are onboard it is fairly simple to stem the flood but if no one is on board then the boat will surely be lost. So do whatever you like but imagine how stupid you would feel if the boat sank while no one was on board.
I get your point. But tell me what is the proper length of absence time after which the seacock should be closed? 1 hour? 1 day? 1 week? Do you close it when you take the dinghy to get some groceries or to eat out?

May be the difference is cultural. I come from the background where risk is unavoidable (and often desirable) part of life. And actually is part of my decision to sail. I also don't treat my boat as a treasure to dot over, otherwise I'd go crazy thinking about it 24/7. It is just a tool to get me out on the water and to have fun. I'd never spend on it beyond the amount I'd be willing to lose, just as I'd never buy a car I coudn't afford to lose. But I understand that for some people a boat is their most cherished treasure and thus they need to cover all the risks to the best of their ability.
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Old 15-10-2014, 21:56   #37
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Re: Did It Yet Again :Banghead:

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Originally Posted by maytrix View Post
So if a seacock goes, how quickly will water come in? More than a bilge pump can handle? Or is it more a question of the bilge pump failing or running out of power?

Just curious.
Very few boats have a bilge pump that can keep up with a 1"/25mm opening to the sea. Also, few have an endless supply of electricity to keep the pump running. And bilge pumps are not designed to run 24 hours a day. They are designed for intermittent duty. You should assume the bilge pump is there to slow the rise and dewater the boat after the flooding is stopped. But it cannot save your boat in your absence.
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Old 15-10-2014, 23:39   #38
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Re: Did It Yet Again :Banghead:

My seawater strainer has a transparent case, so when the engine is running I can see the swirling motion of some bits of debris in the strainer.
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Old 15-10-2014, 23:49   #39
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Re: Did It Yet Again :Banghead:

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Originally Posted by Island Time O25 View Post
How much time away from the boat is too much before one needs to shut off the raw water seacock? Usually in season I am not away from the boat for more than a few days so I don't shut it off as per advise of most pros. I do check it once in a while to make sure it is operating smoothly.
I worry too much that if something gives, like a hose up stream from the seacock, that the consequences are such that I don't want to deal with them. All my sea cocks get turned off every time I leave the boat, and on every time I return.

Besides, it is good practice to exercise them, and with this SOP, it ensures that happens.
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Old 16-10-2014, 00:02   #40
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Re: Did It Yet Again :Banghead:

Never. I seldom close the raw-water input pipe. If I do, always leave a note at the helm. Upon starting the engine, I always check the exhaust for water flow.

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Old 16-10-2014, 01:25   #41
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Re: Did It Yet Again :Banghead:

Dockhead,

I'm a golfer and those that golf know that sometimes you have to move your marker on the green, because it is in another players putting line.

I've simply painted one side of my marker with red paint. When I move it, I turn the red side up. That way, when I go back to set my ball, I'm looking at red and it tells me "uh, uh -something wrong here"

Buy a red disk (roulette chip?) drill hole and tie a string through it. Now get into the habit of hanging it on your electrical panel when you shut off your valves.

Go to start your generator - red? something is wrong. You can use it for other items that you need to remember.
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Old 16-10-2014, 03:39   #42
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Re: Did It Yet Again :Banghead:

Small mistakes like this are healthy now and then. I take a perverse pleasure in screwing up as I feel it makes me humble, more alert and safer.

I did the same thing once. Another time blew one when I knew it was failing. The engine couldn't stay cool at high revs, I suspected a failing impellor. I thought I would change it later. Wrong decision. It blew motoring towards the anchorage. The engine was shut down and I had to put sails up in flukey winds and tack the last few miles. I arrived well after dark in a crowded bay with little manoevering capability.

How about this as a fix: make something simple to block the start switch operation or so you can't miss feeling it whilst operating it in the dark. If it is a toggle switch make a wood or plastic block with a hole for the toggle. You could retain it with a spring pin through a hole drilled in the toggle. For a rocker switch, a plastic wedge it pin that blocks it. Put a cord on it. The cord goes over the seacock such that it only fits when in the open position. It can live in two places. On the switch or on the seacock.
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Old 16-10-2014, 04:00   #43
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Re: Did It Yet Again :Banghead:

I have done that a few times, but always caught it soon enough to prevent damage. forgetting to open the valve on the exhaust hose is far more impressive. The seacocks are normally closed unless in use, so it is a matter of routine start up procedure to open them...but when you are tired and in a bit of a rush to start the motor. If I start the engine down below, I always check for cooling water flow before leaving it by putting my hand on the impeller cover. It gets hot very fast if there is no water and saves the rush back down below to open the valve after finding no water discharging outside.
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Old 16-10-2014, 04:48   #44
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Re: Did It Yet Again :Banghead:

Quote:
Originally Posted by atoll View Post
my brother if he needed to remember something first thing in the morning used to use a ball point to write on his willy so it was the first thing he saw when going for a pee in the morning

I suppose you could call that a variation on the "sea cock" method
Good stuff Alex!

Quote:
Originally Posted by Jim Cate View Post
simply brilliant, Alex!

But it does somewhat limit the length of the warning message...

Jim
And even funnier Jim!!!
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Old 16-10-2014, 04:51   #45
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Re: Did It Yet Again :Banghead:

The problem here is that if Dockie cant remember to check the seacock, he wont remember anything else to remind him either.

Electronic no start is your safest....... a number of options have been suggested. Go do.

report back when done...
and photos

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