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Old 13-02-2011, 15:15   #16
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Originally Posted by delmarrey View Post
!!!!!
It is hard to believe you could be serious, but i don't get the joke. Just in case you are actually serious and actually care.....

If your concern is you cannot buy Kidde CO detectors, including the one linked above, at hardware stores, you can. I bought mine at Home Depot.

If you are wondering if Amazon sells hardware, they do.
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Old 13-02-2011, 16:27   #17
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I learned about it while making out in a parked car (in those days, making out was pretty tame) but now I know just what it's like to get CO overload. Fortunately I survived with only a bad headache and ringing in the ears, which I didn't know until years later was my BF's faulty heater. I hear that very red complexion is also an early sign. However, most victims mistake it for the flu and they are reluctant to leave the bed to get fresh air. And there they die. New research says neurological symptoms can appear months, even years later so if you've ever had CO poisoning (or made out in a parked car with the heater running).
Janet, anytime your in OZ I would like a demonstration.
Happy valentines day Geoff.
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Old 13-02-2011, 16:57   #18
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Originally Posted by Eleven View Post
Many of the gases that are not compatible with humans are heavier than air so gather nicely in sleeping places, especially on a mono.
Vented gas bottle lockers mean high and low vents.
BTW, carbon monoxide is slightly lighter than air and generally associated with warm, rising air, so high vents are better.

Best is an installed heater with flue an CO monitors. Cooking can set it off in the winter, if things are too tight, though in truth I notice it first (headache). Perhaps I am more sensitive than most; I always seem to complain first.
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Old 22-02-2011, 11:27   #19
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Re: Carbon Monoxide

I far as I can tell the active element is the same for all readily purchasable detectors. I use the $30.00 hardware store ones. The new ones with the batteries work just fine. I can see the co level go up in time to add ventilation before the alarm goes off. I bought several and placed throughout the boat. When they stop indicating I buy new ones. If you don't have them you would be surprised how many times the CO level goes up with "normal" activities. I've been woken up because a slip neighbor was idling his engines to warm up, and the co levels were at alarm levels. Running the generator with a tail wind can also set it off. I would rather have it go off too often than wait until the CO levels are going to harm someone.
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Old 25-02-2011, 17:17   #20
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Re: Carbon Monoxide

ok newbie here so gonna ask some questions, I know my boat has a propane detector and smoke detectors. Pretty sure that does not cover Carbon monoxide. Also I am guessing that since C0 is lighter then air it needs to be mounte d up high like a smoke detector?
We have used the little coleman propane heaters for several years in campers and boats but always leave a few windows vented. and nothing sealed super tight. Is this still dangerous?
Do C0 detectors draw a lot of power? I know that my propane detectors seem to draw a considerable amount.
Thanks, and sorry for all the questions but his stuff is important.
Side note We test our detectors regular, the wifes cooking sets them off all the time >
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Old 25-02-2011, 17:30   #21
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Re: Carbon Monoxide

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Originally Posted by Dulcesuenos View Post
Do C0 detectors draw a lot of power?
mine draw 8mA (apiece) in standby mode.
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Old 25-02-2011, 18:13   #22
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Burning Propane

Burning Propane produces Carbon Dioxide & Water (.81 Gal. Water per Gal. Propane Burned)
Which increases the humidity levels tremendously in the boat simply from burning propane.
Adds humidity when ventilation systems draw moisture from outside the boat (and not allowing any way to dry the air).
Propane can also produce sulfur dioxides - Sulfur Compounds in Exhaust are Corrosive.
Propane can also produce Carbon-Monoxide if a burner is not functioning properly.

So, yes you would need a CO2 (carbon dioxide) detector. CO (carbon monoxide) would come from the boat engine exhaust.
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Old 25-02-2011, 18:24   #23
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Re: Carbon Monoxide

BTW-Propane detectors use energy due to there function. When the gas drifts past the panels that have infrared points or towards the sheets that contain the catalysts, they disrupt the system and trigger the alarm. The infrared line is upset by the presence of the drifting gas, which is analyzed. Catalysts lining the sheets react to the wafting gas and identify it as the type of fluid that it recognizes. Take note that gas detectors that contain catalytic sheets are specific for a certain gas.
The microprocessors installed in the gas detectors translate the information from the ultrasonic frequency detected, the catalytic reaction that occurred, or the interruption of the infrared light as a leak and activates the alarm.
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Old 25-02-2011, 18:26   #24
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Re: Carbon Monoxide

Quote:
Originally Posted by Dulcesuenos View Post
ok newbie here so gonna ask some questions, I know my boat has a propane detector and smoke detectors. Pretty sure that does not cover Carbon monoxide. Also I am guessing that since C0 is lighter then air it needs to be mounte d up high like a smoke detector?
We have used the little coleman propane heaters for several years in campers and boats but always leave a few windows vented. and nothing sealed super tight. Is this still dangerous?
Do C0 detectors draw a lot of power? I know that my propane detectors seem to draw a considerable amount.
Thanks, and sorry for all the questions but his stuff is important.
Side note We test our detectors regular, the wifes cooking sets them off all the time >
CO is neutrally buoyant...no need to place up or down...just near where you would be sleeping and unable to monitor your symptoms.

Yes...any open flame heater can produce CO..some less than iothers..but just cracking a window is no guarantee you are getting enough turnover of air.

The battery powered ones last for months and months...the hardwired ones I can't imagine draw more than milliamps...go to a site and check the specs if that worried about draw.
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Old 25-02-2011, 20:32   #25
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Re: Carbon Monoxide

Just to add a bit.

Marine CO detectors are designed to not react to certain types of vapors that you don't normarally find in houses, such as styrene, but are common on boats. A lot of things on boats outgas. Fiberglass, vinyl, and of course heaters, water heaters and so on. The CO detector industry responded to complaints when detectors first became available because all those early detectors used to be alarming at anything, like the sun shining on your vinyl cushions. They also made them more rugged and adapted to a marine environment. And yes they do cost more.

You can use a household CO detector but keep in mind there are a lot of things on boats that can set it off.

My CO detector on my motor home has been set off a few times by the RV next to mine starting their engine. The fume detector goes off every time my wife sprays lysol in the bathroom. The smoke detector only goes off when she cooks pancakes. These devices can be finicky.

Fortunately my boat is a dinghy and doesn't need a CO detector.
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Old 26-02-2011, 00:03   #26
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Re: Carbon Monoxide

I have a wood burning stove that I just installed low in the galley area...on either side of the flume there are opening ports and in the main cabin there are two passive ventilators, there is also a mushroom vent right above the large quarter berth. I always leave both those ports open even though it gets wet in the rain which, of course is the best time to build a fire! Sitting here aboard in a t-shirt with the wind and rain blowing over the boat...Yummm! I have not gotten a co2 detector yet but the fire is out when I get in the bunk, still need to do that though!
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Old 26-02-2011, 00:25   #27
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Old 26-02-2011, 20:29   #28
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Re: Carbon Monoxide

Assuming I can hang Boatman and not sell I can't wait for summer here when I'll be sitting in the cockpit with a Tecate wondering why the hell I ever wasted my time putting a stupid wood burner in my boat!
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Old 27-02-2011, 08:11   #29
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Re: Carbon Monoxide

Many people put theirs right next to the bed, e.g. close to the nose. Very smart to have one in every area where someone is sleeping.


Quote:
Originally Posted by Dulcesuenos View Post
ok newbie here so gonna ask some questions, I know my boat has a propane detector and smoke detectors. Pretty sure that does not cover Carbon monoxide. Also I am guessing that since C0 is lighter then air it needs to be mounte d up high like a smoke detector?
We have used the little coleman propane heaters for several years in campers and boats but always leave a few windows vented. and nothing sealed super tight. Is this still dangerous?
Do C0 detectors draw a lot of power? I know that my propane detectors seem to draw a considerable amount.
Thanks, and sorry for all the questions but his stuff is important.
Side note We test our detectors regular, the wifes cooking sets them off all the time >
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