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Old 09-02-2016, 14:49   #31
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Re: Boarding Neighbors in a Storm

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Originally Posted by rognvald View Post
Have you ever been sued?
No, but in a professional capacity I have been -- suffice it to say -- extremely close to the action. A lot closer than a civilian who has merely been sued once or twice.

I don't mean to make light of it -- I do of course understand what a rape it can be.

For the record, I have made significant contributions to tort reform in the U.S., which is badly needed. Our tort system is an abomination which is mainly a system of wealth transfer, with plaintiffs' lawyers as the main recipients.


But despite all of that -- despite, despite -- I would still do everything I could to give aid to a fellow sailor, or his boat, and the liability be damned.


Note that I have better insurance coverage than most cruisers. 5 million pounds ($7.5 million!) of liability, and up to a million pounds of legal expenses. Word to the wise!
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Old 09-02-2016, 15:35   #32
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Re: Boarding Neighbors in a Storm

"But despite all of that -- despite, despite -- I would still do everything I could to give aid to a fellow sailor, or his boat, and the liability be damned.


Note that I have better insurance coverage than most cruisers. 5 million pounds ($7.5 million!) of liability, and up to a million pounds of legal expenses. Word to the wise! " Dockhead


And if you didn't carry millions in insurance and were the average Ma and Pa cruiser on a limited budget and insurance, would it change your response and "the liability be damned?"
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Old 09-02-2016, 16:23   #33
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Re: boarding neighbors in a storm

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Originally Posted by Stu Jackson View Post
<snip>

It baffles me to no end why sailing instructors donít teach this simple courtesy to their students.
It seems that simple courtesy should always be part of every lesson for novice sailors.

<snip>
I graduated from my ASA 101/103 combination course last week. For what it's worth, our instructor was very clear about the need to secure the main halyard away from the mast and the line firmly secured at the end of the day. The reasons of avoiding line chafe and being considerate to others in the marina were cited.
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Old 09-02-2016, 16:40   #34
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Re: Boarding Neighbors in a Storm

Quote:
Originally Posted by rognvald View Post
"But despite all of that -- despite, despite -- I would still do everything I could to give aid to a fellow sailor, or his boat, and the liability be damned.


Note that I have better insurance coverage than most cruisers. 5 million pounds ($7.5 million!) of liability, and up to a million pounds of legal expenses. Word to the wise! " Dockhead


And if you didn't carry millions in insurance and were the average Ma and Pa cruiser on a limited budget and insurance, would it change your response and "the liability be damned?"
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I can honestly say -- absolutely not. I would do the right thing. And be willing to pay for it.

Being willing to help, only on the condition that there are no risks for you? --

sorry, that is not being "willing to help". It's just not.
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Old 09-02-2016, 16:42   #35
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Re: Boarding Neighbors in a Storm

I would help out any of my marina mates any time and have done so. They have done as much for us. I always leave extra dock lines out and available for our boat or for anyone to borrow in a pinch & we have pointed this out the neighbors. We also keep a De-Fib on board accessible by retriever line from the galley hatch. This is also known to the local boaters. Old School, I sill hold the door for a lady or anyone else with an arm-load.
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Old 09-02-2016, 16:46   #36
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Re: Boarding Neighbors in a Storm

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I would help out any of my marina mates any time and have done so. They have done as much for us. I always leave extra dock lines out and available for our boat or for anyone to borrow in a pinch & we have pointed this out the neighbors. We also keep a De-Fib on board accessible by retriever line from the galley hatch. This is also known to the local boaters. Old School, I still hold the door for a lady or anyone else with an arm-load.


My kind of guy!
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Old 09-02-2016, 17:33   #37
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Re: Boarding Neighbors in a Storm

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Originally Posted by Dockhead View Post
I can honestly say -- absolutely not. I would do the right thing. And be willing to pay for it.

Being willing to help, only on the condition that there are no risks for you? --

sorry, that is not being "willing to help". It's just not.

Dockhead,
It's comforting to know that the majority of respondents to this thread would help another sailor in need. We have adhered to this principle for over 25 years but have witnessed many disappointing instances to the contrary in our travels. In most cases, it wasn't fear of litigation but rather one of inconvenience and keeping schedules. Kudos to all who do the right thing. Good luck and safe sailing.
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Old 09-02-2016, 17:44   #38
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Re: boarding neighbors in a storm

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Originally Posted by mrichmon View Post
I graduated from my ASA 101/103 combination course last week. For what it's worth, our instructor was very clear about the need to secure the main halyard away from the mast and the line firmly secured at the end of the day. The reasons of avoiding line chafe and being considerate to others in the marina were cited.
Glad to hear that. Please note that Captain Raines wrote that in 2004!!!
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Old 09-02-2016, 19:55   #39
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Re: Boarding Neighbors in a Storm

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I sill hold the door for a lady

Watch out! You can get your teeth knocked in these days for that sort of ofensive behaviour!
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Old 09-02-2016, 20:15   #40
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Re: Boarding Neighbors in a Storm

All depends on the situation.

Imminent danger to people or property and I can easily and safely do something about it...sure I've stepped in.

If it's not clear the line will chafe thru or it's just rubbing a bit and I would need to go dig thru the boats hatches to find a line...probably not.

If at a marina, another option is to notify the staff.
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Old 09-02-2016, 20:51   #41
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Re: Boarding Neighbors in a Storm

I lived on my boat for over 10 years, both in a marina, on a mooring or at anchor. Yes, I have climbed aboard of other boats many dozens of times to add another line if there was one about to break or broken, or secured their sails, and I relocated boats at anchor or on moorings if they were dragging. Hmmm, it always helps if the owners tell you where they keep their hatch and/or ignition key!
I have climbed on other boats to close open hatches when it rained.
I have have never climbed aboard another board to tie off a halyard.
I always received thanks from the owners, never a scalding.

Even last week I watched ( from the shore) a ~28 ft classic yacht run aground, the sailing club dinghy (with 60 HP) could not free it. A larger wooden yacht (53 ft) slowly edged closer to help, the small rescue boat brought across a longer towline, and..... the bigger boat lost drive when going full power astern, likely due to something like losing its keyway on the propshaft.

So, that yacht too became fast on the sand/weed bank.
I radioed, and enquired if they needed help. The answer was obvious.
I launched a larger RIB with 100 HP (not the official sea rescue boat) and was able to pull the larger boat off, and get it (?her) back into the marina.

No-one sued anyone. In Australia there is a "Good Samaritan Act". No one here (to my knowledge) who had good intentions, has been successfully sued.
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Old 09-02-2016, 21:33   #42
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Re: Boarding Neighbors in a Storm

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...rummaging through their lockers...
NEVER!
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Old 09-02-2016, 21:47   #43
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Re: boarding neighbors in a storm

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Originally Posted by MarkJ View Post
Great question!!

Often we get that situation when a boat is dragging with no one aboard.
I try to get someone else to come out as witness.
But if damage is about to be done then you/we are behoven, imho, to help.
Others stand back and video it, some get in and help.
I think you may be a Helper, not a Bystander


Mark
I'm with Mark on this one. I often check other boats in the harbor prior to a storm, and take a supply of rags to use as anti-chafe if I think it's needed.

Last time I boarded someone's boat the light air headsail (on a continuous line furler) started to come unfurled at the top and flap so violently in the 25-30 knot wind that it was surely going to shred, and it was making a racket and causing the mast to "pump". It was also making the boat "hunt" back and forth at anchor so strongly that it was at risk of breaking free.

I called the local harbormaster on VHF and told him I was going over to assist, then jumped into my dinghy with a handheld VHF. When I got aboard I also found out it was on a (undersize) 3/8" rope rode (34 foot boat).

Soon after I got there the harbormaster arrived to assist, then the pump-out boat. So there were now 2 heavy power boats tied up alongside (plus my dinghy tied aft) and the boat was overpowered by wind on an undersized rode (and probably undersized anchor also). I was amazed the anchor held. There was a raft up of 5 power boats directly downwind, and they were spectators with beverages in-hand. (If they had understood the situation they would either helped or broken up the raft-up to clear out in case the boat broke free).

I tried to release the halyard to pull down the continuous line furler and it was jammed (probably a wrap at the top) and wouldn't come down. So I put the furling line on a winch and started to work it (with a winch handle) to get it wrapped up. Just as I started doing that the pumpout guy got an idea and went to the bow to release the BOTTOM of the continuous line furler! NO!!! I stopped him and got the sail wound in (twisted ) and secured.

Later the owner and his wife returned from their day ashore and I went over to tell him what happened, and why his headsail was twisted. I described the violent flapping and inevitable destruction if it was left alone. I apologized for any wear and tear on the sail but assured him if I hadn't done that he wouldn't still have the sail in one piece. He thanked me.
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Old 09-02-2016, 22:03   #44
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Re: Boarding Neighbors in a Storm

The previous example of the botched Coast Guard is grossly misleading.

That's because the Coast Guard was on on an assigned rescue mission. In such a situation it is held to a much higher standard than a good Samaritan private boat owner. The same is true of any trained person (like an MD) engaged in their profession.

In the case mentioned, the CG patrol boat embarked on a rescue mission with an inaccurate fathometer, compass and Loran (pre GPS days). After it took a fishing boat into tow, the Loran failed and the weather deteriorated. Instead of asking the fishing boat to check their Loran, the CG boat commander headed for a buoy thinking it marked the harbor entrance. The buoy actually marked a well known and dangerous reef. The CG boat towed the fishing boat directly onto the reef causing the boat's loss and the death of five fishermen aboard.

Here's a pretty good review of the case law.

http://diamondfuquay.com/Negligent_Rescue.pdf

I plan to keep lending aid to my fellow sailor.
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Old 09-02-2016, 22:20   #45
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Re: Boarding Neighbors in a Storm

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Some people absolutely do not want you on their boat no matter what and don't see the need to post a sign saying so -

Boarding someone elses boat
Wow, that Jammer Six guy had some seriously good trolling skills!
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