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Old 13-01-2010, 14:06   #31
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Location: Kea'au, Big Island, Hawaii
Boat: Cascade, Sloop, 42 - "Casual"
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Everyone goes aground. You might keep it a secret and be able to dodge the truth but everyone does. Just be prepared and wait your turn.

I've gone aground 3 times. Each time in a boat small enough to push off once I jumped in the water. The first time in a boat larger than 14 I didn't think of just jumping into the water to push off (Catalina 22 fixed keel) so I used my engine and waited for a bit higher tide. That was very lucky and taught me a good lesson. From those lessons I learned never to go aground in a big boat.

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Old 13-01-2010, 15:35   #32
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bummer big time. Not so much the running aground, we all do it, but not being prepared. And I don't mean having tow insurance. I mean not having the ability to get yourself off.

In order to get yourself free you need a few pieces of gear.
1. A dingy
2. A fishing pole with a sinker and bobber.
3. Good anchor(hopefully you have that all ready

Use the fishing pole to sound for deep water. You do this by setting the bobber on the line a tad further from the end weight than your draft. Now cast off the boat till you find water where the bobber sinks.

Put your anchor in your dingy and take it to where it can be set and used to pull your bow to deep water.

If your so grounded that the boat won't move simply heel the boat. Move weight to one side to heel. If that won't heel her enough, swing your boom over board and attach the mainsheet to the dingy with a bridle such that you can lift the dingy straight up. Now sink the dingy and haul it up toward the surface. Once it gets at the surface the weight should begin to pull the boom down and heel the boat. You must have a very stout topping lift. If not you can always run the mainsheet(the end that attaches to the main)back to the end of the boom for support.

I've seen boats heeled over via this method to do bottom work. I've used the boom out with me hanging off the end in order to get off. I've helped pull a boat off by taking an anchor out and after getting it set attached the main halyard to the rode and used the main halyard winch to pull the mast head over. I could have put the boat's spreaders in the water if necessary.

There's a company somewhere close to anICW bridge that rents 50gal drums to sailors ach them to their mast head in order to heel the boat enough to get under the bridge.

For me it's all about being self sufficient.

There are lots of ways to heel a boat.

good luck and best wishes as you climb the learning curve. Yes,at times it can be steep. It took me at least ten years of sailing before I could go out and NOT learn something new.


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