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Old 29-12-2009, 13:39   #16
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I had fun helping out these guys get back afloat...hopefully I have a positive credit somewhere..
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Old 29-12-2009, 13:43   #17
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Sorry to hear it. But take heart -- there are only two kinds of sailors who never run aground: type 1 never leaves the pier. type 2 is a spectacular liar.
Quite, cost me a good bottle of Scotch for the tow plus a new propellor my first time

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Old 29-12-2009, 14:10   #18
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There are two kinds of sailor, those that have and those that haven't....

On our first sail in One Love we were charging up the centre of San Diego bay heading for the bridge when a beeping comes from the cabin.

Janet looks at me slightly paniced (at this point we're patting ourselves on the back for just getting out of the slip and having the sails up!) and I ask her to drop below and find out what it is (yes - project upcoming to get a depth gauge readout in the cockpit).

She looks back slightly more paniced - "The depth gauge!"

"What does it say?"

"6", a pause, "4", another brief pause "3, 2 ... 1". Janet's wide eyed now and honestly I'm a little frozen - its time for a U Turn but its blowing hard and we're not ready for it in fact we've never tacked this boat before..... oh well ...

"Ready about", "Helm hard over".

As we go around Janet shouts up "Zero!".

I'm waiting for the deceleration, realizing that in the hussle of getting the boat ready for its first sail I don't even know if the tide is going up or down.

It doesn't happen and as I write this we're still in the first group of sailors, waiting to join the second, though we've come close a couple of times since.

In many ways Eric I wish we had run aground already just to get it over with but there's time yet

Great write up and no-one got hurt, lessons were learnt and you'll be back for more.
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Old 29-12-2009, 14:20   #19
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It happens to all of us sooner or later, some years ago in the bahamas on a full moon night near the spring equxox and the tide was much bigger than i had expected, we all went to sleep and in the middle of the night we keeled over- what a surprice and rude awaking this was!
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Old 29-12-2009, 14:27   #20
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Originally Posted by theonecalledtom View Post
There are two kinds of sailor, those that have and those that haven't....

On our first sail in One Love we were charging up the centre of San Diego bay heading for the bridge when a beeping comes from the cabin.

Janet looks at me slightly paniced (at this point we're patting ourselves on the back for just getting out of the slip and having the sails up!) and I ask her to drop below and find out what it is (yes - project upcoming to get a depth gauge readout in the cockpit).

She looks back slightly more paniced - "The depth gauge!"

"What does it say?"

"6", a pause, "4", another brief pause "3, 2 ... 1". Janet's wide eyed now and honestly I'm a little frozen - its time for a U Turn but its blowing hard and we're not ready for it in fact we've never tacked this boat before..... oh well ...

"Ready about", "Helm hard over".

As we go around Janet shouts up "Zero!".

I'm waiting for the deceleration, realizing that in the hussle of getting the boat ready for its first sail I don't even know if the tide is going up or down.

It doesn't happen and as I write this we're still in the first group of sailors, waiting to join the second, though we've come close a couple of times since.

In many ways Eric I wish we had run aground already just to get it over with but there's time yet

Great write up and no-one got hurt, lessons were learnt and you'll be back for more.

Funny Story.....but hang out as long as you can...as there is no guarantee it only happens once...
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Old 29-12-2009, 16:01   #21
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Ouch, that sure hurt the wallet! I think I'd be looking at the $150 a year as cheap insurance if you plan on going places where it may happen again. Gunkholing is fun but I end up getting stuck once in a while too.

The worst grounding I ever had was at 3 Brothers island in Adolphus reach just outside Kingston Ontario. Not tidal but nice n mucky. My lady and I picked up a couple of friends, and went there to go fishing n swimming. We came in to the beach and stopped with about a foot of water under the keel. Terri and I jumped over and put the anchor solidly into the beach as the wind was offshore. My buddy an his lady stayed aboard, fishing while Terri and I swam and scrubbed the bottom. We were having a blast, not paying attention, and the wind turned, so the boat ended up grounding. Opps.

Now with both of us on board, she was well n truly stuck. So I went over the side to push, then Ian, and finally Ian's girlfriend ( a somewhat portly lady of 230lbs) leaving Terri to handle the tiller n engine controls, and we managed to get the boat back into deeper water. All in all, a valuable lesson. Getting Darcy back in the boat was another lesson.

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Old 29-12-2009, 16:08   #22
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Originally Posted by theonecalledtom View Post
There are two kinds of sailor, those that have and those that haven't....

On our first sail in One Love we were charging up the centre of San Diego bay heading for the bridge when a beeping comes from the cabin.

Janet looks at me slightly paniced (at this point we're patting ourselves on the back for just getting out of the slip and having the sails up!) and I ask her to drop below and find out what it is (yes - project upcoming to get a depth gauge readout in the cockpit).

She looks back slightly more paniced - "The depth gauge!"

"What does it say?"

"6", a pause, "4", another brief pause "3, 2 ... 1". Janet's wide eyed now and honestly I'm a little frozen - its time for a U Turn but its blowing hard and we're not ready for it in fact we've never tacked this boat before..... oh well ...

"Ready about", "Helm hard over".

As we go around Janet shouts up "Zero!".

I'm waiting for the deceleration, realizing that in the hussle of getting the boat ready for its first sail I don't even know if the tide is going up or down.

It doesn't happen and as I write this we're still in the first group of sailors, waiting to join the second, though we've come close a couple of times since.

In many ways Eric I wish we had run aground already just to get it over with but there's time yet

Great write up and no-one got hurt, lessons were learnt and you'll be back for more.

The areaaround the Coronado bridge, both North and Southm have some shallow spots. A friend one mine was joking about whether I shold set up the GPS or not before we left. He was driving and we hit this sandbar. It was on a rising tide. We tried heeling the boat over witht he sails. We could get Ohana to spin but not to move. . "Anyone want a beer," I was ready to wait it out but decided to try the engine. Finally we spun her around and reversed track with the engine.

Beersmith. Two lessons I can think of are 1) get some blankets on board for emergencies and 2) ask other sailors if there are any unmarked hazards to be a ware of in any new area. I'll take that second one to heart and ask around people around La Paz.
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Old 29-12-2009, 16:33   #23
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Quote:
He told me to not get discouraged since pretty much everyone has made that mistake
Been there too. When you first start out there is a lot to get used to as you might expect and it appears you have all those issues to deal with and are working through them just fine. There are also things to "get over" this would be one. You are now a member of a very unexclusive club - everybody that isn't new to boating.

The towing insurance is usually worth it. My groundings have been far easier but my mechanical problems made up for them so there are a lot of ways to get nailed. Nice to know I'm sure. You now have local knowledge so hoist a beer!

You learn and you know what to do when you go aground. With a few good years of experience you run aground a lot less but the insurance will cover those. The smarter you get the more you sail. You worry less because you know more, but the dumb stuff never goes away.

Most problems are simple and some are cheaper than others. Relax, plan ahead, and don't hit anything! After that you just use your local knowledge.
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Old 29-12-2009, 16:35   #24
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I had a similiar incident on crystal river. Heading down river with mom dad two nieces and their dog while talking to dad and pointed between markers was swept out of channel ran on a rock and holed the hull!!! After freeing the boat with Kim holding a rag over the hole I beached it on the very outside island and tied it to some palm trees so it wouldn't fall over when the tide went out. I had everything to do a patch but it required staying on the island overnite till the tide came up again. By no means my only grounding episode but definately the most dramatic. I've got the drill pretty downpat now. I carry a 300'rode and anchor at the stern and quickly drop the dinghy, sound the area and get a kedge out right away. I've literally had to drag off places before using 3 anchors and winches. Luckily not for quite a while now.
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Old 29-12-2009, 18:12   #25
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Ugh...a tough and expensive lesson learned. I think it's definitely worth the peace of mind to get the TowboatUS coverage. We've had it but have not needed it yet in the two years we've owned our boat. Soft groundings only. Knock wood.

I read your entire blog, an excellent read. My brother is a serious surfer too, so I respect your motivation and admire your perseverance! Best of luck in your endeavor, and I'll be following your blog.

Fair winds!
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Old 30-12-2009, 07:29   #26
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Thanks for the encouragement everyone

Its good to hear that I learned a lesson that was bound to come. I just found out that my insurance covers $500 each towing incident, so hopefully I can get a hunk of that money back!
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Old 31-12-2009, 10:43   #27
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Beersmith,
happy to see that you didn't get discouraged and that at least you'll recover a few bucks.
What I'm not that happy about is to hear of such lack of mutual support in the US (at least this is what I could understand from the thread)
In Europe, and particularly in Italy, we have so many defects, greed and selfishness included, more or less as everywhere. Nevertheless, in case of an accident involving a pleasure boat it's normal practice for other fellow-sailors to give support, and for free (as far as possible).
It happened to me to tow a sailboat with a broken engine on a 0-wind sunday. And that's because it would have been annoying for them to call the CG when other boats were around.
And CG here is supposed to give support for free when needed (exception made for those who run out of fuel.... but I guess those deserve to pay for being fool)
I'm keeping my boat at a no-profit club marina: the members pay actual costs and some of us give their labour for managing the club and keeping it alive, but nobody is supposed to earn anything. All of us are requested to give support to each other in case of need. It works since decades. Of course it's a matter of culture, traditions, history, society etc but I think that if it works here it should work in US as well. Wouldn't it be possible to set up such a kind of club in the States?
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Old 12-01-2010, 21:40   #28
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Sorry to hear it. But take heart -- there are only two kinds of sailors who never run aground: type 1 never leaves the pier. type 2 is a spectacular liar.
Still, a depthfinder (or someone on the bow tossing a weighted line) is certainly a first defense. Compared to the cost of that tow job, the cost of an inexpensive (Uniden) basic depthfinder is a pittance.
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Old 12-01-2010, 22:20   #29
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Beersmith,
As the saying goes, "If you haven't been aground, you haven't been around." I've woken up a few times over the years to find that my anchor has dragged and I'm sleeping on what once was freeboard. Usually, it was the voices of those walking across the beach, to observe the scene, that woke me.
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Old 13-01-2010, 01:06   #30
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You poor bugger. It happens to the best of us mate
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