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Old 11-03-2019, 13:52   #61
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Re: An "Exciting" Weekend!

heh, we once had an end slip too. I begged them to move us, and they did, because I said I didn't want my dockings to become a problem for everyone ELSE along the way to the slip. They got the point and moved us much farther out toward the end of the fairway. Much less stressful on days with a lot of wind.
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Old 11-03-2019, 13:52   #62
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Re: An "Exciting" Weekend!

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Originally Posted by Sir_Crabs_A_Lot View Post
Welcome Goodkat,
I may be showing my age, but when I was a newbie sailor 35 years ago I was shown how to sail by a friendly sailor on my dock, and HE recommended a book to me, and if it's still in print you should have a look at it; "Chapman Piloting, Seamanship, and Small Boat Handling." by Elbert S. Maloney. It covers everything.

Found it for a massive $4 online! I'll give it a good read, thank you for the recommendation
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Old 12-03-2019, 05:56   #63
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Re: An "Exciting" Weekend!

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All of those are good points. I should mention however that this is our last trip in this slip. The marina was kinda enough to let us take over a different and more convenient spot that doesn't back up into the pier. Our current slip only has about 6ft of extra space to move around in, ....
Glad you have been moved as the original space sounds like a nightmare even for an experienced sailor. I have a similar problem when the wind is from the east. As I am normally on my own and have no possibility of an approach from downwind to get into the berth, I have developed two strategies:

1. Call assistance from the marina, and have ropes already looped over the guardrails so that they can attach to cleats quickly.

2. Alternatively fender up and rest on the pier on other side of the berth (like your old one except I can access my normal berth from the pier). Then take ropes across to my berth and winch myself across. - Haven't needed to do this yet because the marina has always provided personnel.
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Old 12-03-2019, 13:41   #64
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Re: An "Exciting" Weekend!

The really important thing is to have everything set up, ready to go, before you enter the marina:

Fenders out (fender board if need be)

Lines on cleats, fed out over the lifelines so that they will pull off free, but not blow into the water

People stationed with the lines ready to step off if you get the boat close enough. No jumping down onto docks.

Ann
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Old 13-03-2019, 10:58   #65
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Re: An "Exciting" Weekend!

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Glad you have been moved as the original space sounds like a nightmare even for an experienced sailor. I have a similar problem when the wind is from the east. As I am normally on my own and have no possibility of an approach from downwind to get into the berth, I have developed two strategies:

1. Call assistance from the marina, and have ropes already looped over the guardrails so that they can attach to cleats quickly.

2. Alternatively fender up and rest on the pier on other side of the berth (like your old one except I can access my normal berth from the pier). Then take ropes across to my berth and winch myself across. - Haven't needed to do this yet because the marina has always provided personnel.
I like #2. Hopefully won't need to in the new berth

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Originally Posted by JPA Cate View Post
The really important thing is to have everything set up, ready to go, before you enter the marina:

Fenders out (fender board if need be)

Lines on cleats, fed out over the lifelines so that they will pull off free, but not blow into the water

People stationed with the lines ready to step off if you get the boat close enough. No jumping down onto docks.

Ann
This is something I remembered after my first single handed docking. A friend of mine recommended making what he called "elephant ears" over the lifelines with the docking lines, and I've been doing so ever since. I did forget to throw fenders out last time (of course). Lots of habits that still need forming, that's for sure
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Old 19-03-2019, 01:41   #66
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Re: An "Exciting" Weekend!

I think the windows on sails are to view tails.
Too visual check flow on the pressure systems.
Internet wouldn't allow me past page 1. If previously said.. +1 to tails.

Tail.. Blows , dangles, upwinds, tells conditions of sail pressure flow and use..
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Old 19-03-2019, 10:26   #67
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Re: An "Exciting" Weekend!

Hi Goodkat,
I read your thread earlier whilst on lunch break at work. I'd like to gift you a clew.
Reads like you blew out a window of the main. Having a red and a green streamer attached to such a window to share fulcrum central helps heaps. Usually windows are there to look through. View rigging, headsail, streamers on stays. Just easier to look through then around.
Three main torques of boat are keel (turn), heel(wind spillage) and mast(propulsion).
Most people might think of mast as sail boat hence let's start there!

Lightning storm. Hanging chains from stays into water will greatly reduce the chance of a hole in the hull. At mooring.. If able to run chain from backstay into water via mooring then head sail won't catch fire.. Anyway.. Better than a hole in the boat.
Thunder.. The sounds stays make when confussion of torque is unstable. Hence moving towards a clew.
Reads like during blow you inefficiently used too much power; reef down; reduce power. Higher efficiency of less power is more power.
The clew. Sail boats can be very expensive to maintain or serve long time between maintenance requirements. Accelerate slow and build momentum.
The main traveller was mentioned. Leave that to the leeward side. Learn to flow tails from a reduced torque. Only if in absence of wind, move the traveller windward. The main sail has a boom. (Boom Vang pulleys that down). The boom is like a long clew. In very light winds, by advancing the traveller windward and easing the sheet to suit; the heeling torque of the main will move high thus heeling the boat easier. The heel of the boat would help the sail use gravity; it's own weight, to halt it flapping around and make it a more efficient mast torque shape, hence propulsion. If sail is of enough wind to shape I would strongly recommend leaving the traveller down(Lee side). This will allow the Hull torque to be nearer the water level. It is of an extremely good habit to tack into a traveller Lee and then accelerate. Less stress.
The clew is similar. Some boats don't have a headsail pulley, some boats have twin headsail travellers, some boats sheet hard to near winch.
If you have a pulley that tensions the headsail sheet toward the centre of the vessel. This is what I refer. Learn to tune a headsail, play the main later.
When tacking. Similar to traveller. Down is out. Tension sheet. Sailing. Play with them. Maintain a heading and play with them to achieve flowing tails. Tensioning the sheet via the pulley will flow torque higher on mast. I'm not the best advice giver. I've never learnt to sail. I've only learnt how to learn to sail. But from my recollection, the clew is a vital fulcrum of a headsail(another load of torque). Sail boats, especially keel boats, produce massive amounts of torque and can break really big things really easily.
Your boat reads awesome. I prefer less sail and every streamer streaming such that 1 is concentrated with helm and main and the other is concentrated with foresail. Learning properly becomes quicker quicker because response ability will develop and you'll probably beat me to both being on helm with 1 sail each
I wish you the best
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Old 19-03-2019, 21:30   #68
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Re: An "Exciting" Weekend!

She's gorgeous. I don't know furlers and assume they give the same cloth to be available as a big Genoa or a tiny storm jib or any size in between. If true that's a massive advantage regarding keel torque(rudder weight on helm) because balance is quay.
I had used a lighter weight 24 footer as a cruising boat, I was knot skipper, a low budget understanding (eg don't break things) and a 4 sail inventory; main, Genoa, jib and spinnaker.
One of the first and very few of upgrades was a thick needle and a palm strike armour to push the needle. Soon after the opposite hand scored armour too. (Even small sails are heavy).
That lead to the best upgrade she received; a third reef of main and a reef of jib. We couldn't tune sails well and by reducing main and increasing forestay sizes we could tune keel better without extensive knowledge of individual tunes. With only 1 remembered breach of practice, we would preferred to sail short of wind torque and take preference to keel balance; eg agility and ease to use swells.
The breach of practice was fun though.. Fool sail; the 3 big ones in gale with favoured swell and tide. Lasted a while until 1 of the tensions snapped and the weight of sail under the water disabled us from righting. A knife sliced a sheet.
Hence. I think she's gorgeous. Furling; you beauty.
Some swells liked 3rd reef main, some swells liked reefed jib. Most times a bit of both. Having combinations help suit vessel to conditions.
Reefings are worth the holy loss during calm.
BTW. welcome.. And I still haven't a clew to that of tuning sails.
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Old 20-03-2019, 01:42   #69
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Re: An "Exciting" Weekend!

I found this. Might be useful.
Be careful jibbing with twin rear stays. We added 1 reef to main making main 3 sizes. Temptation to go 3 was there but by then winds are so strong that a teeny weeny foresail would propel us well when underway sail.
My friend owns a twin rear stay fractional rig and his biggest scares include controlling a jibe.
(Note: my language might be wrong written).
Bon voyage
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