Cruisers Forum
 


Join CruisersForum Today

Reply
 
Thread Tools Rate Thread Display Modes
Old 08-08-2008, 05:34   #1
Registered User

Join Date: Feb 2007
Boat: 1973 Morgan 36T
Posts: 808
Images: 17
Waterspout chases sailboater

This happened in Oyster Bay NY (about 20 miles east of New York City.

Check it out :
Waterspout chases sailboater in Oyster Bay -- Newsday.com
__________________

__________________
Morgan Paul is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 08-08-2008, 06:27   #2
Moderator Emeritus
 
GordMay's Avatar

Join Date: Mar 2003
Location: Thunder Bay, Ontario - 48-29N x 89-20W
Boat: (Cruiser Living On Dirt)
Posts: 31,579
Images: 240
And some Florida Waterspout footage:
msnbc.com Video Player
__________________

__________________
Gord May
"If you didn't have the time or money to do it right in the first place, when will you get the time/$ to fix it?"



GordMay is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 08-08-2008, 10:41   #3
Senior Cruiser

Cruisers Forum Supporter

Join Date: Apr 2008
Posts: 769
We don't have many trailer parks up here, so we don't often get tornadoes.

What's up with that sailboat in Gord's video? Was he going in for a closer look? Trying for a Darwin award?
__________________
anotherT34C is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 08-08-2008, 12:15   #4
Moderator Emeritus
 
David M's Avatar

Cruisers Forum Supporter

Join Date: Sep 2007
Location: San Francisco Bay
Boat: research vessel
Posts: 10,150
Somehow, the Tasmanian Devil comes to mind.
__________________
David

Life begins where land ends.
David M is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 08-08-2008, 14:58   #5
Kai Nui
Guest

Posts: n/a
We witnessed a couple of waterspouts about 10 years ago off the coast of Davenport, Ca. Fortunately, we were on land. What an ominous site!
Has anyone experienced one up close and personal? I have been through a tornado, and a hurricane, but I am curious what a waterspout would be like. Not curious enough to go looking for one
__________________
  Reply With Quote
Old 24-08-2008, 18:56   #6
Registered User

Join Date: Aug 2007
Location: Southbound
Boat: Pearson 31-2
Posts: 303
I saw spouts on more than a few occasions while in the USCG including one that passed by us less than 1/2 mile away like 2 ships passing each other. They picked it up on the fire control radar and it was holding its course, so we held ours. It created a stir of interest on board but noone was overly concerned about it. I don't think they are particularly rare or dangerous except maybe at night.
__________________
Aquah0lic is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 24-08-2008, 19:32   #7
Registered User

Join Date: Jul 2008
Posts: 2
I could be wrong, but aren't waterspouts simply mini tornadoes that do not reach land?

I went to college in Oswego, NY, and saw quite a few of them out on Lake Ontario in the 3 years I was there.
__________________
NorthCoastSail is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 25-08-2008, 07:24   #8
Eternal Member
 
imagine2frolic's Avatar

Join Date: Feb 2008
Location: Las Brisas Panama AGAIN!
Boat: Simpson, Catamaran, 46ft. IMAGINE
Posts: 4,508
Images: 123
Crossing the gulf stream several years ago. We ran across this one that developed into 2 that went on to touch the water. I wouldn't want to cross paths with one
Attached Thumbnails
Click image for larger version

Name:	WATERSPOUTS BAHAMAS.JPG
Views:	212
Size:	71.0 KB
ID:	4826  
__________________
imagine2frolic is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 25-08-2008, 07:49   #9
Moderator Emeritus
 
Pblais's Avatar

Join Date: Mar 2003
Location: Hayes, VA
Boat: Gozzard 36
Posts: 8,700
Images: 15
Send a message via Skype™ to Pblais
We see small ones all the time. I've seen three at a time here. Always far enough away. They tend to have a very small base unlike the maxi tornadoes out in the flat lands that have more convection to drive the thunderheads. They also tend to be short lived but also come up quickly. You could potentially maneuver away from one. They could also shred your sails. They also come with a thunderstorm as well and that could be the bigger problem.
__________________
Paul Blais
s/v Bright Eyes Gozzard 36
37 15.7 N 76 28.9 W
Pblais is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 26-08-2008, 05:14   #10
Moderator Emeritus
 
GordMay's Avatar

Join Date: Mar 2003
Location: Thunder Bay, Ontario - 48-29N x 89-20W
Boat: (Cruiser Living On Dirt)
Posts: 31,579
Images: 240
Waterspouts come in a variety of sizes and strengths, and arise from one of two different mechanisms. Dr Joseph Golden* defines the waterspout as a "funnel which contains an intense vortex, sometimes destructive, of small horizontal extent and which occurs over a body of water." Waterspouts fall within the class of atmospheric phenomena known as convective vortices that includes tornadoes, dust-devils, landspouts, and hurricanes. These are circulations driven by, or associated with, either dry or moist convection.

Tornadic waterspouts are formed from mesocyclonic action, in a manner essentially identical to traditional land-based tornadoes. These water spouts can start as tornadoes over land., then move over a body of water. This type of waterspout can be fairly destructive.

The second type of waterspout is formed over water, initially due to warm temperatures in the lower atmosphere along with high humidity. These fair weather waterspouts are generally not as dangerous, and are more common than tornadic waterspouts.
Waterspouts are most common over warm oceans, but they can occur over just about any body of water (I’ve seen them over Lake Superior’s frigid waters).
They commonly develop beneath lines of rapidly growing cumulus congestus clouds. These cloud lines can be quite shallow, averaging between 12,000 to 14,000 ft. deep with bases about 2000 ft. above the surface. The waterspout funnel forms in the rising air just ahead of any rainfall from these clouds in association with warm water temperatures and high humidity in the lowest mile of the atmosphere.
While the thin-columned waterspouts appear to be sucking water up from the water surface, what is actually seen is the condensation of water vapour in the rotating vortex air. As the column rotates, the highly humid air is cooled by expansion to its condensation point. When the water vapour in the vortex condenses, it makes the whirling mass visible. At the surface, the vortex winds stir the water into mushroom-shaped water sprays at the funnel base.

* Much of the significant early research on waterspouts comes from the investigations of Dr Joseph Golden in the waters surrounding the Florida Keys during the 1960s and 1970s.

Golden distinguishes five distinct stages in a waterspout's life cycle:

1. Dark spot: A prominent circular, light-coloured disk first appears on the surface of the water, surrounded by a larger dark area of indeterminate shape and diffuse edges. This light inner circle measures approximately 7.5 to 31 metres (25 to 100 feet) in diameter.

2. Spiral pattern: Next, a pattern of light- and dark-coloured surface bands spirals out from the dark spot on the water surface. This stage represents the primary growth phase of a waterspout in which the vortex intensifies while simultaneously expanding its radius of influence.

3. Spray ring: A dense swirling ring (annulus) of sea spray, called a cascade, appears around the dark spot with what appears to be an eye. Stage 3 marks the point at which convergence of inward-flowing angular momentum reaches a critical value in the ring surrounding the dark spot. This accumulation of angular momentum is accompanied by a gradual increase in wind speeds. When the winds attain a speed of 83 km/h (52 mph), a spray ring arises, and the lower portion of the waterspout begins to advance.

4. Mature vortex: The waterspout, now visibly extending from the water surface toward the overhead cloud mass, achieves maximum organization and intensity. The mature funnel often appears hollow with a surrounding shell of turbulent condensation. The spray vortex may rise to a hundred metres (several hundred feet) or more and often creates a visible wake and associated wave train as it advances. In Stage 4, the rotation and the maximum winds around the centre of the spray vortex peak, and the funnel grows to its maximum diameter and length. Forward motion also reaches its maximum during the latter portions of Stage 4.

5. Decay: The funnel and spray vortex begin to dissipate when the inflow of warm air into the vortex weakens. The spiral pattern begins to disappear during the end of Stage 4 and by the beginning of Stage 5 is completely gone. The waterspout's forward motion decelerates as well. During Stage 5, the funnel will attain its maximum tilt from the vertical. Finally, when the flow of upward lifted warm air is disrupted by strong sinking motions of rain cooled air, the waterspout integrity starts to collapse. Dissipation occurs abruptly when an advancing shower overtakes the waterspout from the rear.
__________________
Gord May
"If you didn't have the time or money to do it right in the first place, when will you get the time/$ to fix it?"



GordMay is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 26-08-2008, 05:40   #11
Registered User

Join Date: Feb 2008
Location: Oz
Boat: Jarcat 5, 5m, Mandy
Posts: 419
I have seen some beauties in Twofold Bay NSW. I have been told it has the world record for size of water spout. Ther is some good footage of some Sydney -Hobart boats going through some off Sydney
__________________
Robertcateran is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 26-08-2008, 06:17   #12
Registered User

Join Date: Feb 2007
Boat: 1973 Morgan 36T
Posts: 808
Images: 17
Quote:
I have seen some beauties in Twofold Bay NSW. I have been told it has the world record for size of water spout. Ther is some good footage of some Sydney -Hobart boats going through some off Sydney


http://www.sailinginnovation.tv/view...2b6d3bead98a92

Weatherzone Forums: South Coast Tornado
__________________
Morgan Paul is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 26-08-2008, 06:29   #13
Registered User

Join Date: Feb 2007
Boat: 1973 Morgan 36T
Posts: 808
Images: 17
Quote:
I have seen some beauties in Twofold Bay NSW. I have been told it has the world record for size of water spout. Ther is some good footage of some Sydney -Hobart boats going through some off Sydney
Here is a short video

Sailing Innovation TV :: Upload Video - Sail, Race, Regatta - Waterspout footage and Volvo 60s
__________________
Morgan Paul is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 26-08-2008, 06:55   #14
Eternal Member
 
imagine2frolic's Avatar

Join Date: Feb 2008
Location: Las Brisas Panama AGAIN!
Boat: Simpson, Catamaran, 46ft. IMAGINE
Posts: 4,508
Images: 123
Quote:
Originally Posted by Morgan Paul View Post

Mother Nature can be beautiful even as she terrorizes you!!!!!! Thanks for the post MP
__________________
imagine2frolic is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 26-08-2008, 07:04   #15
Registered User

Join Date: Sep 2007
Posts: 298
I saw a nasty little waterspout while sailing a 16' Hobie Cat in Long Bay, Negril Jamaica. My plan was to release the main sheet and jump overboard if it got too close. Fortunately, it kept its distance.
__________________

__________________
TexSail is offline   Reply With Quote
Reply

Thread Tools
Display Modes Rate This Thread
Rate This Thread:

Posting Rules
You may not post new threads
You may not post replies
You may not post attachments
You may not edit your posts

BB code is On
Smilies are On
[IMG] code is On
HTML code is Off
Trackbacks are Off
Pingbacks are Off
Refbacks are Off




Copyright 2002- Social Knowledge, LLC All Rights Reserved.

All times are GMT -7. The time now is 06:17.


Google+
Powered by vBulletin® Version 3.8.8 Beta 1
Copyright ©2000 - 2017, vBulletin Solutions, Inc.
Social Knowledge Networks
Powered by vBulletin® Version 3.8.8 Beta 1
Copyright ©2000 - 2017, vBulletin Solutions, Inc.

ShowCase vBulletin Plugins by Drive Thru Online, Inc.